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Thread: From a stupid cut to a smart cut- transitioning.

  1. #1
    Fountainhead Organichu's Avatar
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    From a stupid cut to a smart cut- transitioning.

    When I first started dieting a while ago, I didn't really know anything about nutrition- I ate under a thousand calories daily, didn't do regular weightlifting to retain lean body mass, and got very little sleep.

    As a result, though I dropped about thirty five pounds, I don't feel at all comfortable with my body- I lost a good inch on my biceps, and not significant amounts from my stomach or breasts or legs; effectively, I ****ed up my physique. I lost A LOT of weight on my lifts, and my body looks totally out of proportion now.

    Anyway, past that; since then, and since browsing on WBB, I learned the error of my ways, and here comes my question: I'm still not light enough to go on a bulk yet- I want to continue cutting for another thirty or forty pounds. However, would it be smart to go straight into a good cut, effectively raising my caloric intake a good 1,200+ calories, or should I slowly work up to it? I realize that it's generally good to work into a caloric deficit, but is it essential to do so for an increase? I really don't want to lose any more LBM- since I've realized that what I was doing was completely wrong, I want to get on a good diet ASAP.
    20 y/o, 6'1", 186 lbs, 14% BF
    bench: 350 deadlift: 560 parallel squat: 465
    total: 1375 @ 186

  2. #2
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    One way of doing it would be to essentially have a "refeed" for a week or two, then start your cut. For the next couple of weeks you would eat at around "maintenance" calories, making sure to get plenty of carbohydrates in your diet (not going silly, but don't be afraid of some cereals, breads, pasta etc.) As you've dieted for a while you may need to estimate how many calories to eat, but that doesn't matter - it doesn't have to be precise. Pick a number that sounds reasonable - maybe 2500.

    This will give your body a chance to "recover" from the extreme diet you've been following. It will be able to replenish its glycogen stores, raise your metabolism, and basically regain its equilibrium. You may gain some weight in this period - don't worry too much, the majority of it will probably be water.

    After a couple of weeks you'll likely feel better, be stronger in the gym, and be ready to start your smart cut. This is when you can slowly trim a couple of hundred calories per week or whatever, until you reach the intake you plan to stay at. Of course, this time round you should stick with a decent lifting routine too; don't expect gains, but you should be able to maintain most of your lean mass.

    There are other ways to approach this of course, but that's what I personally would look at doing in your situation.

  3. #3
    Fountainhead Organichu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aspect
    One way of doing it would be to essentially have a "refeed" for a week or two, then start your cut. For the next couple of weeks you would eat at around "maintenance" calories, making sure to get plenty of carbohydrates in your diet (not going silly, but don't be afraid of some cereals, breads, pasta etc.) As you've dieted for a while you may need to estimate how many calories to eat, but that doesn't matter - it doesn't have to be precise. Pick a number that sounds reasonable - maybe 2500.

    This will give your body a chance to "recover" from the extreme diet you've been following. It will be able to replenish its glycogen stores, raise your metabolism, and basically regain its equilibrium. You may gain some weight in this period - don't worry too much, the majority of it will probably be water.

    After a couple of weeks you'll likely feel better, be stronger in the gym, and be ready to start your smart cut. This is when you can slowly trim a couple of hundred calories per week or whatever, until you reach the intake you plan to stay at. Of course, this time round you should stick with a decent lifting routine too; don't expect gains, but you should be able to maintain most of your lean mass.

    There are other ways to approach this of course, but that's what I personally would look at doing in your situation.

    Alright, thanks- sounds good! I'll camp out some nice places around my school to put on some clean but heavy calories. Appreciate it, man.
    20 y/o, 6'1", 186 lbs, 14% BF
    bench: 350 deadlift: 560 parallel squat: 465
    total: 1375 @ 186

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