The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    los angeles
    Posts
    16

    wt/rep progression

    Right now I am following a 3-part workout plan and I have a question about the last part for u guys. For the 3rd part Iam supposed to follow a chart for wt/rep progression. The only problem is that it doesnt really make any sense to me. Hopefully someone here could tell me if they see what the point is to the charts progression. For example over a 10-week period I must go from lifting 3x10@50% max bench to 2x2@95%max. Increasing wt by 5% a week. The earlier wt/reps are way lighter then what I normally lift for my 3 sets of 8. LIke if my max was 200lbs I would only be lifting 3x10@100??? If anyone can shed any light on why the chart goes like this I would greatly appreciate it, thanks.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    117
    I'm a little confused, but this is what I'm getting:

    It doesn't really make sense to say to do 3sets X 10reps with 50% of your max bench, unless 10 reps was the most reps you could do with that amount of weight. Somebody might be able to do 25 reps with 50% of the weight, somebody maybe 5 (though very unlikely). The point is, why stop at 10 if you can keep going. I guess the point is to progessively start doing lower reps with heavier weights instead of doing higher reps with lower weights. I don't know. But regardless, if you can keep going, then keep going, and don't stop until can't lift it anymore. Don't stop at X# of reps just because the program tells you to; it doesn't know that you can do more than that many reps with X% of the weight. I don't know if I've helped explain why the chart goes like that, because I don't think I reallly quite understand it. But I think the point of it is to basically progress you into lifting heavy (low reps). If this is the case, do as much as many reps as you can with X% of weight, then increase the % as it tells you to do and continue to do as many reps as you can with that weight. But I still don't know what the point is of continually lifting heavier with lower reps unless the point is powerlifting or strength. You can get big with doing whatever % of your max, you don't need to lift 95% of you max in order to get bigger. If putting on some mass and strength is your goal, I'd lift about 75% of your max as many times as you can, which is usually about 8-12 reps. If strength and powerlifting is your goal, then I guess just do as the program says, but if you go with the program, either go by how many reps they tell you to do, or what %weight they tell you to do, you can't go by both at the same time, because they don't know how many reps you can do with X% of the weight.
    Last edited by mike107; 10-18-2004 at 02:33 AM.

  4. #3
    Steak and Eggs pusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    NPWRAK, Canada
    Posts
    762
    Quote Originally Posted by WeaponX
    LIke if my max was 200lbs I would only be lifting 3x10@100??? If anyone can shed any light on why the chart goes like this I would greatly appreciate it, thanks.
    Looks something like HST. Search.
    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it." -John Ruskin 1819-1900

    "He who fights monsters should see to it that in the process, he does not
    become a monster. And when you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into
    you." - Nietzche

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