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Thread: BB Bent Rows VS. T-Bar Rows

  1. #1
    Strength & Protection Kiaran's Avatar
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    BB Bent Rows VS. T-Bar Rows

    Just curious about what you all think is a better exercise and why: Barbell Bent Rows or T-Bar Rows?

    I like both but don't have time to incorporate both. I think Bent Rows are a tougher all round exercise but sometimes I don't feel like I'm working my back to it's fullest.
    32 yo - 5'6" - 170 lbs
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    Gym PRs: 370 SQ, 270 BP, 510 DL

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  2. #2
    Moderator Adam's Avatar
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    I like t-bar rows way more because my back doesn't have to hold me up as much.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member dissipate's Avatar
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    according to Strength Training Anatomy by frederic delavier, t-bar rows place more emphasis on the back and requires less effort to set the body in the correct movement pattern.

  4. #4
    Strength & Protection Kiaran's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dissipate
    according to Strength Training Anatomy by frederic delavier, t-bar rows place more emphasis on the back and requires less effort to set the body in the correct movement pattern.
    How ironic, I have the same book...and it says the same thing! heh...
    32 yo - 5'6" - 170 lbs
    USAPL Meet PRs (Raw @154 lbs): 347 SQ, 242 BP, 507 DL, 1096 TOTAL
    Gym PRs: 370 SQ, 270 BP, 510 DL

    The Riddle Of Iron - Kiaran's Garage Training Log

  5. #5
    Moderator Adam's Avatar
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    I have that book too, its awesome. The illustrations are great.
    Best Meet @ Lifts@181:...............Best gym lifts
    Squat...- 403..........................Squat....- 395 w/belt
    Bench...- 303..........................Bench....- 300....Paused in meet - 281
    Deadlift.- 503.....Unofficial 513...Deadlift..- 490
    Total....- 1,203...IPF Class II......All done raw, Touch'n go bench

    "Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly" Robert F. Kennedy

    "A man can fail many times, but he isn't a failure until he gives up"

    "However beautiful the strategy you should occasionally look at the results" John Berardi

    Powerlifting Westside Style

  6. #6
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    i would do t-bar rows if i could but i dont have the equipment in my house so i wil make do with bent over rows

  7. #7
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    barbell rows without question-the T-bar is a bit easier to manage in terms of getting set up right, but the difficulty of barbell rows is what makes is a great movement. In addition, the t-bar row "locks" you into a specific groove and also forces the weight out in front of the body, which can actually cause more damage to the lumbar spine in the long run. At our clinic we get a lot of training type injuries and the most common culprit is the T-bar row ( mostly likely because people do it wrong, not because it is inherently a dangerous exercise)

  8. #8
    AM MMA Fighter crazedwombat's Avatar
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    I have the same book and I agree with ya'll, Tbar.
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  9. #9
    Om. Avocado. MM's Avatar
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    I like t-bar better for all of the same reasons.

    Monkey, you can rig a t-bar set up with an olympic bar and some gym blocks. It's not great, but it works.
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  10. #10
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    I don't think it matters much. Do the one you aren't as good at.
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  11. #11
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    Bent over rowing is an excellent movement for the upper body. Work this movement hard and don't be surprised if you see increases in the squat, bench press and deadlift as well an increases in muscular development. One of the great aspects of the bent-over row is that there is a wide variety of techniques and variations to chose from which means that just about anyone can find a method of performing this movement regardless of their body structure. The important thing is to ensure that your technique is fairly consistent so that increased poundages are the result of strength gains, not in favorable advantages in the biomechanics of the lift.

    The width of your hand spacing should be slightly wider than your shoulders, but this will vary with each individual. Your hand spacing and grip should put you into a position where you can strictly row with the greatest amount of weight. You can use either a pronated or supinated grip. The pronated or overhand grip tends to hit the upper back harder, while the supinated grip tends to work the lower lats a bit more. Experiment with both variations and see which one works best for you, or even use both grips in an alternating fashion. I have found that the supinated grip works best when using an E-Z curl bar to take the strain off the wrists. Use plenty of chalk and or resin on your hands to ensure a firm grip. If you happen to train at a commercial gym that does not allow chalk (somebody should really invent flesh colored chalk) then purchase some resin bags and place them in a large colored sandwich zip-lock bag. You can dip your hands into the bag and get plenty of resin and there will be no waste at all.

    Take a good solid stance, with the feet about shoulder width. Lean forward and bend the knees just slightly so that you nearly settle your abdomen onto your thighs with the hips being the center of gravity. The angle of your upper body can be anywhere from parallel to about 45 degrees though I believe that you should try and get as close to parallel as you can. People with a longer torso tend to do a bit better with a higher angle than an individual with a shorter torso. Make sure the back is flat and stable keeping a slight arch in the lumbar region before the weight is pulled off the floor. There are numerous opinions on the exact part of the torso that you try to pull the bar into. This will vary from individual, but somewhere in the upper abdominal region, just below the sternum is a good reference point. If you are using a supinated grip, you might get want to pull just a bit lower into the abdominal region.

    Because you are pulling a barbell from a position in which you are bent at the hips, considerable stress is placed on the lower back muscles. You should not attempt to add momentum to the lift by yanking or jerking upward with the lower back muscles and extending the body. Lack of proper form means the targeted area does not receive maximum stimulation and can often lead to lower back injury. Heaving and cheating the weight up is very easy to do as the movement is not very natural to start with and the position makes it difficult to use a mirror to monitor and correct your form. There are a couple of things that you can do to eliminate the heaving aspect of the row. First of all, many books and magazines advise that when the bar is lowered to get as much as stretch as possible-it sounds like good advice, but what happens is that once your arms are straightened, in an attempt to get even more of a stretch, you relax and begin dropping the upper body downwards which causes rounding of the back. This places the body into a weakened condition, so that when you attempt to pull the next repetition, you are forced into performing a body swing in order to compensate for the inadequate position. Just lower the body to arms length and pull it back up. Another way to teach yourself to do the movement correctly is to have a training partner place their hands on your upper back along each side of the spine. Have them hold their hands steady and you will be able to gauge whether you are keeping your back stable or not.

  12. #12
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    I don't know what a T-bar is, I usually do barbell rows and underhand chinups.

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    I wannabebig!
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    http://www.netfit.co.uk/bac9.htm

    tbar row above

    or you can throw a barbell in the corner and do the same thing.

  14. #14
    hammin'
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    If you use a barbell, what do you use for a handle?? Can you use one of the close grip cable pulley attachments and just have the bar rest in the 'V' ?
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  15. #15
    I wannabebig!
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    thats fine lots of people do that

  16. #16
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    Good discussion of Bent over rowing Keith. IMO it's one of the best exercises there is. Heavy rowing should be a part of everyone's routine.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Canadian Crippler's Avatar
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    Would the Tbar rows where your using a barbell in a cornet work just as well as a tbar rowing station?
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  18. #18
    Diesel Hercule's Avatar
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    Personally, I feel Ghetto T-Bar Rows(BB in the corner of gym) in my back better than BB Rows. Just a personal preference. Everyone is different, do what works for you.

  19. #19
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    I've taken to using a Tricept bar for bent over rows and really like the motion and the pump in my arms and back. All it really does is place your hands in a neutral almost close grip position. I've also started using it for close grip presses. Glad I found it!

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