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Thread: Join the 300lb Overhead Press Club

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    Join the 300lb Overhead Press Club

    Join the 300lb Overhead Press Club

    By Keith Wassung


    The overhead press has always been the premiere shoulder exercise for strength and development. Few exercises are as satisfying as the overhead press. I believe that if you could find a remote, primitive island in the world and left a loaded barbell on the beach in the middle of the night, within a week, the men of the island would be trying to lift it over their heads. The heaviest recorded weight that has been pressed in an overhead manner was 535lbs by Ken Patera, in the early 1970’s. Patera, who became famous as a professional wrestler, may have been the strongest man ever to compete in Olympic lifting, but he lacked the technical proficiency of his competitors

    Pressing big weights is a real kick and it is rare to see in most gyms. Many years ago, I visited the original Golds Gym in Santa Monica with some friends. We were dressed in street clothes and were wandering around, watching all of the bodybuilders train. We came to a seated press unit and my friends coaxed me to do some overhead presses. I did not want to do this knowing that I was amongst people who routinely pressed 300lbs for 8-10 reps, or at least that is what I was led to believe by reading the various magazines. I started warming up and as I added weight, I began drawing on-lookers. By the time I had 315lbs on the bar, about three-fourths of the gym members had gathered around to watch (talk about pressure) I did 4 hard reps with the crowd enthusiastically cheering me on.

    I believe that if you can bench press 225lbs, then you have the capacity to eventually perform an overhead press with 300lbs. This may take you a year or it may take five years, but the effort will be worth it.

    One of the most common questions that I am asked is what is the best combination of sets and reps to do in order to achieve increased strength and development. My answer has always been that it really does not matter as long as you are training in a progressive manner. Progression and overload are two very important principles that must be followed, yet are often overlooked in many people’s training program. Strength and development is as much of an art, as it is a science. You have to experiment, keep track of your numbers in a training log and make adjustments as necessary. I have always believed that the best way to make consistent, long-term progress is to do a wide range of repetitions in your training,

    In order to increase your standing overhead press, you have to develop near perfect technique, strengthen your weak points and get your body physically and mentally prepared to lift heavy weights over your head.

    Technique

    The body has to work in harmony with itself as a unit. Each muscle or set of contracting muscles has an opposite set of muscles, which are referred to as the antagonistic muscles. For example, the triceps are antagonistic to the biceps when doing barbell curls. To maximize your training, the antagonistic muscles need to be set or balanced against the contractor muscles. When standing in the traditional upright stance, there is little balance and once the lifting begins, the antagonistic muscles actually begin draining the contractor (the ones used in the exercise) muscles of strength and energy. To place yourself in the strongest standing position, you should place one foot approximately 3-4 inches in front of the other in a staggered stance. This will place you in a much stronger stance permitting more work to be performed. Boxers, martial artists, baseball players and track and field athletes also use the staggered stance. If you ever see pictures of past Olympic lifters such as Vasily Alexeev or Paul Anderson, you will notice that their feet are staggered when elevating weights overhead.

    Practice with a somewhat narrower grip-many people use the same grip on their overheads that they do on the bench press but bringing your grip in just a bit will give you a stronger and faster press. Take the barbell from the uprights and get set into your stance, maintaining tightness in the mid-section and lower back. When you begin pressing the bar, you want to be looking at a very slight up angle. This will take your head slightly back and will allow the bar to pass in front of your face without having to change the trajectory of the bar. As the bar clears the top of your head, you will want to push the bar up and slightly back in a straight line so that you end up with the bar directly over the center of your head.

    You would be surprised how many people perform this movement incorrectly. Instead of pressing so that the weight ends up overhead, it ends up actually in front of the head. The leverage that your shoulders have to work against when you’re in this adverse position can really put undue and unnecessary stress on your shoulders-the joints, not the muscles, and will inhibit you from pressing the maximum amount of weight in this exercise.

    Lock the bar out, lower back to your shoulders and repeat for the desired number of reps. It is important to start each press from a stopped position. It is easy to develop a habit of lowering the weight and then rebounding off the shoulders to start the next rep. By starting each rep from a “dead” position, you might initially have to reduce the weight you are lifting, but you will be much stronger in the end, especially when performing maximum singles.


    Strengthening Weak Points

    One of the limiting factors in the overhead press is the strength and flexibility of the lower back and mid-section. Train your mid-section as hard as you train anything else. Mid-section weakness is very common among lifters. It is not that the mid-section is weak, but it is weak in comparison to other parts of the body that are worked in a progressive manner. If your goal is strength and power, then traditional abdominal isolation exercises, such as crunches and leg raises will only take you so far in your quest for optimal strength and development.

    The purpose of the mid-section is primarily for stabilization and therefore this area needs to be worked in a static manner. Do as much of your mid-section training as you can while standing on your feet. Perform overhead lockouts, overhead shrugs and learn to do overhead squats ( Use a search engine and type in overhead squats, Dan John to learn this valuable exercise from the master himself) I like to elevate objects such as dumbbells or a keg over my head and then go for a walk around the neighborhood or up and down the stairs. I walk until I cannot keep the weight overhead, then I place it on the ground, rest for 20 seconds and then keep moving again. These types of exercises will build your mid-section and have a tremendous impact on your overall strength and physical preparedness.

    If you have been working hard on basic exercises such as squats, dead lifts or rows, you have no doubt experienced either a stiff back or overworked lumbar muscles to the point where you cannot relax or tighten them completely. Your back can become as "stiff as a board" with the lumbar muscles so hard to the touch or so fatigued that they are like a steel spring that has been overstretched. It is essential to have the back properly stretched and warmed up prior to performing any type of overhead presses. Hanging from a chinning bar for a minute or two each day will decompress the lumbar spine and increase flexibility. I also like to do some hyperextensions and some very light bent leg dead lifts in order to prepare the lumbar spine for overhead presses.

    Overload & Adjunct Exercises

    Marathon runners traditionally trained by running in excess of one hundred miles each week always at or near marathon pace and speed. The legendary running coach, Arthur Lydiard of New Zealand was one of the first coaches who realized that long distance runners could improve their race times by performing sprint training in their workouts. He used to have his marathon runners compete in the sprint events at the club level. All of his runners hated sprinting but they all loved setting records and winning world and Olympic championships. Coach Lydiard improved his runner’s performance by employing a form of overload. The first principle of weight training is overload. Overload refers to placing greater than usual demands on the muscle group being worked. In essence, to increase muscular performance, a muscle group must be worked harder than it usually works to complete everyday activities. As muscle strength and/or endurance increase, the amount of resistance or repetitions necessary for overload must increase as well. The Overload Principle is a concept based on "overloading" the muscles by lifting more than it is use to doing.

    The primary method of overload for the overhead press is the seated overhead press. This exercise will allow you to work the pressing muscles of the upper body, while minimizing the stress on the lower back. I have found that by alternating the standing press with the seated press, I can use heavier weight and train with a much greater frequency that if I were to only perform standing presses.

    When performing the seated MAKE SURE that you do this with the back braced-do not do this movement sitting on the end of a flat bench or on a stool as this places a great deal of stress on the lumbar spine, which is what we are trying to avoid in the first place. The design of the seated press machine if very important.


    You don’t want the back of the unit to come up in higher than your shoulders-if it does, you can’t get your head out of the way of the bar. You also want to be sure that you can brace your feet against something in order to drive the low back solidly against the backboard of the unit. If you do not have the ideal apparatus as your gym, then might have to mix and match some equipment pieces in order to achieve the desired effect. This is why you should always keep a roll of duct tape in your gym bag!

    I also suggest doing the seated presses starting from the bottom position and not where someone hands it to you from the overhead position, and then you bring it down and back up-you want to mimic the mechanics of the standing overhead press as much as possible. For some variety, you can do a seated 80-degree incline press as a core exercise. This also takes the lower back out of it and really allows you to get used to lifting heavy weights overhead. I believe that if I had never done the seated presses and the 80-degree presses, I would have never exceeded 300lbs in the standing overhead press.

    The next movement is a heavy push press done in the power rack. Use a weight that is roughly equivalent to your best single rep in the standing overhead press. You put the pins 4-5 inches below the starting position. squat down and get set with the bar, explode up elevate the bar to just over the top of your head, and then slowly count to 4 on the way down, set it on the pins, explode and repeat for 6 total reps-this is the most brutal thing I have ever done for the upper body-you will likely need a spotter (just to yell at you, rather than for safety reasons) and if you feel like or want to do a second set, then you did not use enough weight on your first set. This will do as much to improve your overhead strength capacity as anything I know.

    If you need to improve the strength of your triceps then consider doing some overhead presses while using a narrow grip. I use the same grip that I would for a narrow grip bench press with the index fingers being on the smooth part of the bar and the middle finger on the knurling. You will find that your arms may prevent you from lowering the bar all the way down to the upper chest/shoulder region. Use whatever range of motion works for you. As an added twist, you can use this same grip to do overhead lockouts. Place the pins in the power rack so that the bar is even with the top of the head and then press the weight to lockout.

    Barbell bent over rows are an excellent adjunct movement for the overhead press. It is safe to say that barbell rows are an excellent adjunct movement for just about every lift. Work this movement hard and don't be surprised if you see increases in all of your lifts as well an increases in muscular development. One of the great aspects of the bent-over row is that there is a wide variety of techniques and variations to chose from which means that just about anyone can find a method of performing this movement regardless of their body structure. The important thing is to ensure that your technique is consistent so that increased poundage is the result of strength gains, not in favorable advantages in the biomechanics of the lift.



    FINAL THOUGHTS

    The frequency in which you train the overhead press is entirely an individual decision. If you are focused on improving the bench press, then consider adding in the overhead press about once a week. If you want to specialize on the overhead press, then you can do it as much as twice per week. I personally always did best training the overhead press about three times every two weeks. I would suggest doing nothing but standing overhead presses during one workout, then the seated presses and the adjunct work on the second workout. Make sure you are keeping your shoulders healthy with proper warm-ups and rotator cuff training. Best of luck on your quest to 300 and beyond.


    It's not the best athlete who wins, but the best prepared."
    - Arthur Lydiard,


    Keith Wassung
    Last edited by Keith Wassung; 01-18-2005 at 02:21 PM.

  2. #2
    PT... Plenty Tough POPS's Avatar
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    Excellent read. Thanks for the valuble info as the overhead press is probably my favorite execise

    T.O.M
    Formerly "Tough Old Man"

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    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    I have but one problem with this article. A 300 lbs overhead press is in no way comparable to a 225 lbs bench press if the movement is done relatively strictly (or the ability to bench press 225 lbs does not translate to the ability to press 300 lbs or even close to it).

    In fact, prior to steroids becoming part of the equation a 300 lbs strict press (or even relatively strict press) was only achieved by the strongest of the strong. There are many men who can bench press 400 lbs but cannot overhead press (in good form) even 275 lbs.

    I do agree the overhead press is a GREAT movement that all should practice.


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    Quote Originally Posted by chris mason
    I have but one problem with this article. A 300 lbs overhead press is in no way comparable to a 225 lbs bench press if the movement is done relatively strictly (or the ability to bench press 225 lbs does not translate to the ability to press 300 lbs or even close to it).

    In fact, prior to steroids becoming part of the equation a 300 lbs strict press (or even relatively strict press) was only achieved by the strongest of the strong. There are many men who can bench press 400 lbs but cannot overhead press (in good form) even 275 lbs.

    I do agree the overhead press is a GREAT movement that all should practice.
    Chris,

    You mis-read what I said- I did not compare a 225lb BP to a 300lbs OHP, I simply stated that a person who had achieved at least a 225lbs bp has the necessary capacity to one day press 300lbs overhead. You are in-correct about a 300lb press being only achieved by the "strongest of the strong" back when the press was still contested in olympic lifting, it was frequently achieved-ready any old Strength and Development magazine in the contest results section and you will see what I mean. There is a HUGE difference in not being able to press a weight and not having the potential to press a weight-which was the whole point of this statement.

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    nice. i think i'm gonna have to try some of those things.

    kieth, i think i'm going to start compiling the things you write on these boards into a microsoft word document for my own personal use. you don't have a problem with that do you?

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    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    Let me ask you a question, would you agree John Davis was one of the strongest men of all time in his pre-steroid day?

    If your answer is yes please go on to tell me how much he pressed at his best.

    In fact, in 1953 Doug Hepburn pressed 365 lbs at the Junior National Championships for a world record .

    In the same contest Paul Anderson made his national level debut as an Olympic lifter with a press of 300 lbs. Paul weighed in the 280 lb range at this time and his 300 lb press was VERY impressive. Now, I am not sure who you consider to be the strongest of the strong at that time but anyone pressing 300 lbs + was world class. This is, of course, a clean and STRICT press not the lift which was later banned when guys like Alexeyev were doing 500 lbs in a standing incline press with a push.

    One other thing, Olympic pressing included the feet being on the same plane, not staggered.


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    Quote Originally Posted by chris mason
    Let me ask you a question, would you agree John Davis was one of the strongest men of all time in his pre-steroid day?

    If your answer is yes please go on to tell me how much he pressed at his best.

    In fact, in 1953 Doug Hepburn pressed 365 lbs at the Junior National Championships for a world record .

    In the same contest Paul Anderson made his national level debut as an Olympic lifter with a press of 300 lbs. Paul weighed in the 280 lb range at this time and his 300 lb press was VERY impressive. Now, I am not sure who you consider to be the strongest of the strong at that time but anyone pressing 300 lbs + was world class. This is, of course, a clean and STRICT press not the lift which was later banned when guys like Alexeyev were doing 500 lbs in a standing incline press with a push.

    One other thing, Olympic pressing included the feet being on the same plane, not staggered.
    1. Staggered foot stance was not illegal in OL competition

    2. John Davis was well over 350lbs in the press 55-60 years ago, if you move forward to say the mid 1960's to the early 1970's when OL lifting was in its prime with the 3 lifts being contested-you will see that 300lb presses, even among the men who weighed less than 200lbs were not un-common. Paul Anderson eventually pressed over 400lbs and the world record in the press was set at 520lbs in the early 1970's. I have worked with way too many guys over the years to not be convinced that a 300 lb press is achievable for most-but not all people-but I affirm that a guy who has hit a 225lb bench at least has the requisite structure to one day press 300lbs-but its all a mind set-if you think you can you can and if you think you cant-you cant-its that simple. I could take just about any guy over the age of 18, who is at least 165lbs and has done a 225lb bench press-and if they would listen and do what I tell them, could have a 300lbs press within two years.

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    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    Really staggered feet were allowed in Olympic pressing? Are you quite sure?

    Can you show me a picture of a PRESS done with staggered feet by an Olympic lifter?


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    Banned The_Brick's Avatar
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    So is that basically when they take it from the top of the chest to above the head?

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    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    Ok, I checked with a few folks who know about these matters to be sure, staggered feet were never allowed during the PRESS in Olympic weightlifting competitions.

    Now, you mentioned pressing power in the late 60s and early 70s to counter my pre-steroid argument. Unfortunately steroid use was quite common in weightlifting by that time.


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    good read

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    Senior Member Ares's Avatar
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    :withstupi

    Can't wait to see some more good stuff in the future.
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    I have never used drugs

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    THE OVERHEAD PRESS RULES

    Below are the rules for the Press proper (not the clean part) taken directly, word for word, from the 1970 AAU Weightlifting Committee Rule Book.

    From Page 34: The Press proper

    At the referee's signal the bar shall be lifted until the arms are completely extended vertically above the head*, without any jerk, without stopping, without bending the legs, without exaggerated lean back of the trunk*, without displacement or movement of the feet. Remain in this final position motionless, until the referee's signal to replace the bar on the platform.


    : Incorrect movements for the Press.

    1. Cleaning in several movements.
    (using a continental to rack the bar)

    2. Starting before the referee's signal.

    3. Bending of the legs, however slight, equally at the start or during the movement of extending the arms.

    4. Flexing the arms after the referee's signal.
    (

    5. Bending the trunk by flexion or extension.


    6. Exaggerated lean back of the trunk under the bar.


    7. Uneven extension of the arms.

    8. Pausing during the extension of the arms.

    9. Incomplete extension of the arms.

    10. Rotation of the trunk.

    11. Moving the feet.

    12. Raising the toes or heels during the press.

    13. Replacing the bar to the platform before the referee's signal.

    Details concerning refereeing the Two Hand Clean and Press.

    1. The clap for the press.... Wait for the lifter to be absolutely motionless and balanced. If the latter moves the feet after the start without extension of the arms, it is "No Lift" and there is no case for giving a new start, as has often been stated.

    2. Details on what is motionless after the Clean....The referee's signal shall be given as soon as the lifter becomes absolutely motionless in all parts of his body.

    3. Difference of interpretation.... This can only arise in the slight lean back of the trunk and can only be conceived in a limited manner. This "slight lean back" of the body permitted by the rules, consists of a slight swaying backwards to allow the lifter to pass from the "dead point" to the end of the lift, with the arms extended vertically, and not of an almost complete "lay back"


    4. Separation of the feet...at the discretion of the lifter.
    ( in the beginning, the lifters had to stand with their feet together like a soldier at attention. Thus the term "military press". They then loosened up on this rule, I don't know exactly when it was, and said the lifters could have their feet apart, but not wider than shoulder width. Finally, I don't know the exact time, lifters were allowed to stand as wide as they wanted.)



    5. Position of the head.... at the discretion of the lifter.

    NOTE: Nothing about orientation of foot, just seperation of feet in terms of width
    Last edited by Keith Wassung; 01-18-2005 at 08:47 PM.

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    Strength & Protection Kiaran's Avatar
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    Who gives a rat's a$$ if they were on roids or not, it's still f'n impressive. I mean, 300 lbs is still 300 lbs. I think I can put up a measilly 115 on my max...them boys were strong.
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    Wannabebig New Member HahnB's Avatar
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    One of my favorite exersises. Too bad my tendonitis won't allow it for a while.

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    Senior Member Canadian Crippler's Avatar
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    I've gotta say thank you Keith, and aswell thank you chris mason. Your debating has actually been really informative to the newbier members like myself.
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    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    I never said you used steroids. My argument was that a 300 lbs strict press is something that was very rare prior to steroid use.

    The feet were allowed to be apart but not staggered.


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  19. #19
    I drink your milkshake twm's Avatar
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    Good read, good debate. I can barely max 180 with dumbbells and 215 on barbell. I can't even imagine pressing 315 at this point.

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    i couldn't imagine pressing 200. but i think i'm gonna work on it hardcore because i want to one day lift one of my friends over my head. maybe i'll be able to when i'm a senior, i'm a sophmore now.

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    Superb post,
    It's very interesting to read.
    I am looking forward to know more.
    Thanks for creating this awesome thread post.

  22. #22
    Squat Heavy, Squat Often Cards's Avatar
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    While this thread is over 6 years old.....I did enjoy rereading it. I always enjoy forum posts where Chris adds his opinion...there are a number of them from back in the day, I would advise people who are bored of the normal ""HOW IS MY ROUTINE" to take a look at the older posts, it's a different read.
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  23. #23
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    I don't quite add my 2 cents as much as I used to. I probably should get back to more of that.


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    Super Moderator vdizenzo's Avatar
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    I wonder if Keith wants to join the 400 Overhead Press Club. He put a lot of thought into it. I just SFW!

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    Last edited by vdizenzo; 09-11-2010 at 03:14 PM.


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  25. #25
    Squat Heavy, Squat Often Cards's Avatar
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    That is awesome!
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