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Thread: Too old for the gains I had when I was 18?

  1. #1
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    Too old for the gains I had when I was 18?

    Back when I was 18 I would lift 3 days a week incredibly hard. People would stand in awe at how hard I pushed myself, I had a real reputation for being "extreme" and all that. I made incredible gains. I added about 20lbs of solid muscle or more.

    Those days seem long gone now. I'm in my mid twenties and I am not seeing gains like that.

    Was it the fact that I worked so hard back then that brought gains or was it because I was younger?

    Sometimes I wonder if I should start working that hard again. I mean I workout very hard now but back then I pushed myself beyond what is considered "working out hard".
    Last edited by Dedicated; 04-07-2005 at 12:42 PM.

  2. #2
    *412* AKraut's Avatar
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    I think workouts should always be done with a lot of intensity. Also, your mid-twenties are still a great time to get stonger, your body may be settling into a size but your test levels should still be pretty optimal....

    I'm just 20 now, but I feel like I'm making much better gains in strength than I did when I was 17-18. I've been about the same weight for 2 years now.
    Last edited by AKraut; 04-07-2005 at 12:49 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKraut
    I think workouts should always be done with a lot of intensity. Also, your mid-twenties are still a great time to get stonger, your body may be settling into a size but your test levels should still be pretty optimal....

    I'm just 20 now, but I feel like I'm making much better gains in strength than I did when I was 17-18. I've been about the same weight for 2 years now.
    Thanks for the reply.

    I think will start working as hard as I possibly can.

  4. #4
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    I'm 27 and have been making far bigger gains than ever before. If you work out hard enough you should have no trouble. Hell, most of the best pro bodybuilders are in their 30's.
    5'9" 195 lbs
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  5. #5
    Senior Member bigpoppapump979's Avatar
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    but most pro bb's dont rely too heavily on natural test...your t levels could be coming down but probably not significantly at your age. get some tribulus or 6-oxo

  6. #6
    aka Latman harv's Avatar
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    Keep at it bro...push it as hard as you can and the gains will come.

    I benched 315 as a 165lb HS senior and, for a while, I honestly thought it would only go down hill from there.

    Well - 2 nights ago I benched 405...at the ripe young age of 33. I got there by making slow, steady progress over a few years...not by trying to "Build Rome in a day"
    34 y/o, 5-10", ~210 lbs, natural
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  7. #7
    Usedtobebig Member
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    Dedicated - age is not the problem. As an oldie I can still make gains. So you have no worries in your twenties.
    You probably just need a rest or a change Get some advice on your training and diet.
    And remember you dont get stronger in the gym. You get stronger while recovering from the gym.
    Train with your brain not your heart

  8. #8
    Wannabebig Member
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    I know more about age than I know about lifting. But I figure that with reasonably good health you have around sixty years of lifting ahead of you. I think the best way to achieve your best is to lift your hardest. I would not expect the rate of gains to remain constant for sixty years. I admire your dedication and wish I had started younger.
    age: 55
    began wt. trning Jan 2004
    Before I was 52 years old, I didn't know squat.

  9. #9
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    Your testosterone levels may be low,although it shouldn't be the case because you are in your mid twenties,which I would assume means you are about 25 years old,...you should be at your peak,your test levels should be extremely high! Well,this is rare,but in some ocassions some people may suffer from low testosterone levels even as early as in their early twenties,but this is rare. Go to the doctor,have yourself checked out.

  10. #10
    Bodybuilding Mythbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dedicated
    Back when I was 18 I would lift 3 days a week incredibly hard. People would stand in awe at how hard I pushed myself, I had a real reputation for being "extreme" and all that. I made incredible gains. I added about 20lbs of solid muscle or more.

    Those days seem long gone now. I'm in my mid twenties and I am not seeing gains like that.

    Was it the fact that I worked so hard back then that brought gains or was it because I was younger?

    Sometimes I wonder if I should start working that hard again. I mean I workout very hard now but back then I pushed myself beyond what is considered "working out hard".
    I'm going to come out on the opposing side of the people here and say that I don't think there is any problem. Back then the gains you made were probably newbie gains. When you first start working out, your gains come fast, but the longer you workout, the slower they come (if you are natural, anyway). As for working out harder, that can be risky. Here's why. Back then you may have been able to get away with training extremely hard, because you were not as strong or developed as you are now. Training extremely hard, when you are much stronger, puts much more stress and strain on the body.

    If you wish to do this, I would suggest easing into it slowly.

  11. #11
    Wannabebig Member
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    You also gotta remember that the bigger you get, the harder it will be to gain. For example it's a whole lot easier going from 15 inch arms to 16 inch arms than going from 16 inch arms to 17 inch arms.

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