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Thread: Ability to gain fat

  1. #26
    Senior Member Manveet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    Fructose isn't a high GI carb.

    The issue with fructose is in it's relationship to increasing triglycerides, which, in turn, is linked with insulin resistance.

    Having lived through this particular nightmare (ie high tris and IR), I'm necessarily interested in research relating to this link, which has been established in animals and which is ongoing with humans.

    http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/2/1/5
    http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/con...tract/23/4/456
    You are correct, fructose is not a high GI carb, my mistake.

    McDevitt RM, Poppitt SD, Murgatroyd PR, Prentice AM.

    Medical Research Council Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Cambridge, United Kingdom. r.mcdevitt@au.sac.ac.uk

    BACKGROUND: Previous short-term studies (< or =6 h) showed differences in energy expenditure (EE) and macronutrient oxidation in response to overfeeding with different types of dietary carbohydrate. This finding could have implications for obesity. OBJECTIVE: We used 96-h continuous whole-body calorimetry in 8 lean and 5 obese women to assess metabolic disposal (energy dissipation and glycogen or fat storage) of a controlled excess of dietary energy supplied as different carbohydrate sources or as fat. DESIGN: Five dietary treatments were applied in random order: energy balance (control) and overfeeding by 50% of energy requirements with fat (O(fat)) or predominantly with glucose, fructose, or sucrose (O(cho)). Macronutrient oxidation rates were assessed from nonprotein gaseous exchanges. Net macronutrient balances were calculated as cumulative differences between intake and oxidation. RESULTS: Increased EE in response to overfeeding dissipated 7.9% of the energy excess with a variation in EE of <1.7% across overfeeding treatments (NS). EE during the O(fat) treatment significantly exceeded that during the control treatment in the lean but not in the obese women. There were no significant differences between lean and obese women in macronutrient oxidation or balances, so data were pooled. O(cho) induced glycogen storage on day 1 ( approximately 100 g) but thereafter progressively stimulated carbohydrate oxidation so that balance was reached on days 3 and 4. Fat oxidation was proportionately suppressed. Of the excess carbohydrate, 74% was oxidized; there were no significant differences between the various O(cho) treatments. O(fat) stimulated fat oxidation by 18% and suppressed carbohydrate oxidation. On average, 12% of the excess energy was stored as glycogen and 88% as fat; there was no significant difference between overfeeding treatments. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in fat balance during controlled overfeeding with fat, fructose, glucose, or sucrose.

    Again, I might need to do some more research in this area.
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  2. #27
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    The conclusion you quoted is not proof of no effect, but rather is not proof of an effect. Not quite the same thing, of course.

    It's an interesting puzzle.

    From http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/76/5/911

    "the 2 monosaccharides—glucose and fructose—are metabolized differently. Hellerstein (111) showed that there is little de novo lipogenesis from glucose under eucaloric conditions in humans. In contrast, Schwarz et al (29, 30, 112) reported 3- to 15-fold increases in fractional de novo lipogenesis from fructose above fasting concentrations in obese and lean subjects (29, 30) and nearly 30% of circulating triacylglycerol palmitate after fructose ingestion resulted from de novo lipogenesis derived from fructose (112). "

    My thinking is that since the original post had to do with belly fat, which is associated with insulin resistance, and he's drinking fruit juice all day (fructose and other sugars) eliminating the calories consumed from the fruit juice won't hurt, and might help.

  3. #28
    Seen yer member? shansen008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RussianRocket
    not as many as i'd like but its getting there.

    The juice is free, so i MUST drink it.
    Is it real fruit juice though? Look at the label, i bet it has a ton of high fructose corn syrup, and like 10% juice. Hell even if it was 100% juice, juice is very calorie dense. Imagine how many pieces of fruit you would have to squeeze to get 1 tall glass of juice. Then ask how many glasses of juice youre drinking per day. Next do the math and ask yourself if you would ever conceive of actually eating that much fruit while trying to stay lean.

    I eat about 2-4 pieces of fruit per day, i think thats probably above average. I bet that wouldnt even be 1 glass of juice if i were to "juice" my fruit. Not only that but you miss out on the fiber by just drinking the juice.

    Juice = evil :evillaugh
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  4. #29

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