The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    Atkins: Have we had our fill? [article]

    If you're bored...read. If not...I dunno.

    News that Atkins Nutritionals is seeking bankruptcy-court protection has some nutrition experts sounding the death knell for the low-carb, meat-lovers' diet — the hottest weight-loss craze of the past decade.

    But others say that no matter what happens to the company founded by Robert Atkins, the late cardiologist's vision of what the American diet should become has forever changed the nutritional landscape.

    And the company says it's business as usual for dieters. Colette Heimowitz, an Atkins spokeswoman, says the bankruptcy "will allow us to grow without the crushing debt. Day-to-day operations will continue."

    Critics say the once wildly popular plan — which slashes consumption of breads, pasta, potatoes, rice, cakes, cookies and some fruits and starchy vegetables while beefing up protein — is going the way of the grapefruit and cabbage-soup diets.

    For months, there have been news reports that interest in the diet is waning as people move to more moderate variations such as the South Beach diet.

    "The low-carb diet is on life support," says registered dietitian Keith Ayoob at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, a longtime critic of the Atkins diet. "The bloom is off the low-carb rose. People got bored with it. After a while, they wanted to have an apple or a slice of bread."

    But others say diehard Atkins fans will stick with the program. The bankruptcy news "does nothing to deter me from following the diet," says Andrea Mondello, founder of www.lowcarbeating.com. "I've lost 120 pounds on it, and I feel great. I'm healthier than I've ever been."

    Atkins published his first book on the diet in 1972. The revised version, called Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution, was a huge best seller two decades later.

    The company has been selling low-carb products since 1997. They have included bars, shakes, cereals and bread. But recently sales have suffered because the market is oversaturated with such foods, Heimowitz says.

    She says Atkins Nutritionals plans to continue making its nutritional bars, shakes and candy but will ditch breads and chips. The company will provide wider choices in foods that contain whole grains and fruit, she says.

    She thinks the diet has been unfairly pigeonholed as a very low-carb diet. The first two weeks on the plan only allow 20 grams of carbohydrates a day, but then dieters are allowed more carbs depending on their height, weight and activity level.

    After the first phase, it is about "choosing good carbs, healthy carbs," Heimowitz says. "Anyone familiar with the Atkins lifestyle knows it is about avoiding added sugars and processed white flour while emphasizing the nutrient-dense carbohydrate choices such as deep-green vegetables and whole grains."

    Mondello believes the basic diet has had a major impact on Americans' eating habits. "It has made everybody think twice about processed foods, which is a good thing no matter how you look at it.

    "It made people think about reading labels. It made everybody take a hard look at white flour, white sugar and high fructose corn syrup," she says.

    It also prompted people to focus more on consuming protein, she says. A recent study showed that if you eat enough protein, you're more likely to feel full and eat less, Mondello says.

    Gary Foster, clinical director of the Weight and Eating Disorders Program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, says there are probably "fewer people following a strict interpretation of the low-carb diet now than there were two years ago at its peak. But I still have the sense that carbs are part of the consciousness of people trying to watch their weight."

    More people may be having their hamburger without the bun or being more attentive to avoiding processed foods, says Foster, who is leading government-sponsored research on the Atkins diet. It's examining the diet's effects on weight, arteries, body composition, bones and kidneys.

    Several studies of low-carb diets show that people lose weight while increasing their HDL (good) cholesterol and decreasing their triglycerides, blood fats linked to coronary disease.

    Ayoob says many dieters he has talked to are fed up with cutting carbohydrates so dramatically. They want a more modified approach so they can still have their favorite foods. "They want to have their pasta, but they're willing to eat a sensible portion with lots of vegetables."

    Ayoob is the author of The Uncle Sam Diet, based on the government's new dietary guidelines. He believes there are lessons to be learned from the Atkins story. "I hope people will remember that restrictive dieting is temporary, and a healthy eating style you can take with you forever."

    But Foster says some form of the low-carb diet is here to stay. "It's so hard for many people to lose weight using low-fat, low-calorie methods that there will always be a place for reduced-carbohydrate approaches."
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...1-atkins_x.htm
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

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  3. #2
    Wannabebig New Member HahnB's Avatar
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    "It's so hard for many people to lose weight using low-fat, low-calorie methods that there will always be a place for reduced-carbohydrate approaches."

    All diets are low calorie, they just trick you into eating less one way or another. If you cut out most carbs, you're essentially eliminating a large group of foods that you normally eat aka you're eating less calories.
    My brother and I were brutal. I once chased him around the house with a spoon that I put on the burner. I burned that little pricks leg. -sharkall2003

    Then I saw a little african boy sleeping, and I thought...that is little Okeke. he is tired from herding all the goats and the big goat got away today - Rock

  4. #3
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Mmm... as someone who had a great deal on "by the book" Atkins, I can assure you, there's more to it than that. The BIGGEST deal is appetite control. Low-fat dieting is BRUTALLY hard if you're at all insulin resistant. Low-carb was unbelievably easy.

  5. #4
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    I find it hard to believe that the average person becoming fat was due to too many calories. I've had to eat so much in the past week to get anywhere near 2000 (weight wise midweek I was up to 183. Yesterday I was 177.) that I think that for a lot of people it's becaus they're eating crap for breakfast (if they eat breakfast at all) and then one big saturated fat high sodium crap dinner. So 200 cals and then 800 in one shot.

    I'm not certain the reason atkins worked for so many is because of the low carb... but because of the emphasis on eating enough.

    *shrug*

    Or maybe I was just the most underfed guy in Canada at anywhere from 800 to 1300 (depends if I hit Wendy's or not) cals per day. However, since that's the way the rest of my family and all my friends still eat I find that hard to believe.
    Last edited by ShockBoxer; 08-02-2005 at 06:42 AM.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  6. #5
    Senior Member shootermcgavin7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    I find it hard to believe that the average person becoming fat was due to too many calories.

    How do they become fat, then?

  7. #6
    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    I find it hard to believe that the average person becoming fat was due to too many calories.
    With even a basic understanding on thermodynamics and human physiology, you would see how ridiculous this statement is. If your body requires X calories to perform all of its operations for the day and you eat X + 1, the 1 gets stored. There are variables like fiber intake blocking the absorption of a small percentage of certain nutrients, but in the long term calories are used or stored. If you ate absolute crap for breakfast lunch and dinner, but only took in X – 500 calories, your body would need something to meet the requirements for the day. Those somethings would be fat and/or muscle. If you ate a better calculated X – 500 (higher protein and fiber) and lifted weights with some frequency, the ratio of fat:muscle burned would most certainly be improved (not to mention your X would increase due to activity), but at the end of the day your body would still be governed by the constraints of your caloric intake with respect to your caloric requirements.

  8. #7
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    If you eat too few calories does your metabolism not slow down and greedily take everything it can to turn to fat because it thinks your starving?

    I shot up 55 pounds in 3 years eating 1200 calories or less on an average day. My start weight was 145. How did this happen if there's no such thing as 'too few calories so your body goes into fat-storing mode'?

    There's no way any of my friends hit 2000 to 2500 calories in a day... yet all weigh 200+ at heights ranging from 5'4 to 5'9. The guy who is 6'2 and weighs 380 also doesn't knock back 2000 calories in a day... I lived with him a year.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  9. #8
    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    If you eat too few calories does your metabolism not slow down and greedily take everything it can to turn to fat because it thinks your starving?
    Your metabolism can and will slow down, but not even close to as far as you think. According to some studies, your basal rate will only drop about 10%, which can matter in the long term. Again, the point being excess calories over your requirements. If your requirements are lowered, you will need to eat accordingly.


    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    I shot up 55 pounds in 3 years eating 1200 calories or less on an average day. My start weight was 145. How did this happen if there's no such thing as 'too few calories so your body goes into fat-storing mode'?
    I don't believe that this is possible. You obviously weren't tracking your calories sufficiently as 1200 calories is less than even most women need to maintain. If you were eating crappy food, as indicated by your hypothesis, then you probably did not account for the correct number of calories.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    There's no way any of my friends hit 2000 to 2500 calories in a day... yet all weigh 200+ at heights ranging from 5'4 to 5'9. The guy who is 6'2 and weighs 380 also doesn't knock back 2000 calories in a day... I lived with him a year.
    Again, you probably don't know how many calories are in foods. A tiny McChicken sandwich from McDonald's is almost 400 calories. 2 of those and a medium coke is 1000 calories. That's not a whole lot of food, yet it makes up half of your 2000 calorie

  10. #9
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    From Wendys.com calculating program

    Big Bacon Classic Combo, Biggie Fries, small Frosty

    1410 cal, 61 g fat, 20 g saturated, 7 g trans, 1920 sodium, 166 carbs, 48 g protein.

    And I'm serious when I say that there were days... even weeks... at a time when that was ALL I ate. 3 to 5 times a week... with the non-Wendy's times consisting of the mentioned PB sandwich or coco-puffs once a day. And water... lots of water.

    Frankly, I'm amazed I'm still alive.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  11. #10
    Om. Avocado. MM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    I shot up 55 pounds in 3 years eating 1200 calories or less on an average day. My start weight was 145. How did this happen if there's no such thing as 'too few calories so your body goes into fat-storing mode'?
    Frankly, I think you're probably underestimating how many calories you consumed.
    Don't hate the player. Hate the game.


  12. #11
    I drink your milkshake twm's Avatar
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    fat babies

  13. #12
    Senior Member Jorge Sanchez's Avatar
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    If too few calories made you fat, there would be an obesity pandemic in developing countries throughout the world. But it seems that this is only a problem in developed countries.
    quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur

  14. #13
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    A valid point. Yet I know that I pretty much lived off of a Big Bacon Classic combo with lettuce, mayo, and ketchup, medium fries, and a small frosty every SECOND day for a year... and put on 20 pounds. Non-Wendy's days I'd eat... maybe a peanut butter sandwich if I was feeling particular energetic. A milk-less half bowl of coco-puffs or a slice of toast with butter on it more likely.

    The entire mess comes to about 1300 calories if you believe their website... and the non-wendy's days were lucky to crack 400. Maybe.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  15. #14
    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    A valid point. Yet I know that I pretty much lived off of a Big Bacon Classic combo with lettuce, mayo, and ketchup, medium fries, and a small frosty every SECOND day for a year... and put on 20 pounds. Non-Wendy's days I'd eat... maybe a peanut butter sandwich if I was feeling particular energetic. A milk-less half bowl of coco-puffs or a slice of toast with butter on it more likely.

    The entire mess comes to about 1300 calories if you believe their website... and the non-wendy's days were lucky to crack 400. Maybe.
    If any of this is accurate you have a disorder, which probably needs addressed. If you can get through a day eating only 1 burger, then you have some issues and it is feasible that your thyroid isn't working properly.

  16. #15
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galileo
    If any of this is accurate you have a disorder, which probably needs addressed. If you can get through a day eating only 1 burger, then you have some issues and it is feasible that your thyroid isn't working properly.
    I'm much happier and losing weight now that I've made an effort to eat at least 1600 calories a day. 20 pounds in six months before I started WBB1 just by adding a breakfast to that saturated fat mess, and 3 pounds this week alone after I started WBB1 and went 'clean' with my diet.

    edit: Week and a bit. Started using Fitday on the 24th.
    Last edited by ShockBoxer; 08-02-2005 at 10:50 AM.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  17. #16
    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Again, if you could get through an entire day on one tiny meal, you may have a serious problem. I'd suggest consulting your primary care physician.

  18. #17
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    Dude. You have no cue what you are talking about. How do you know you were eating 1,200 calories or less? Did you track your cals on FitDay?

    If you really did gain 55lbs eating that little, you must have one of the slowest metabolisms ever in the history of mankind. It took me eating almost 4,000 calories to gain 45lbs from a starting weight of 145lbs over a period of 9 months, and I'm just now stabilizing in weight at 190-195.

    Gaining/losing weight has everything to do with calorie intake. It's what that weight is (muscle or fat) that is determined by WHAT you eat and how much exercise you are getting.
    5'9" 195 lbs
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  19. #18
    Senior Member shootermcgavin7's Avatar
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    The average person can burn a little more than 1,000 calories/day if they lay in bed 24/7.


    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    If you eat too few calories does your metabolism not slow down and greedily take everything it can to turn to fat because it thinks your starving?
    Maybe/Maybe not; but you're still going to lose weight.
    Last edited by shootermcgavin7; 08-02-2005 at 10:56 AM.

  20. #19
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guido
    Dude. You have no cue what you are talking about. How do you know you were eating 1,200 calories or less? Did you track your cals on FitDay?

    If you really did gain 55lbs eating that little, you must have one of the slowest metabolisms ever in the history of mankind. It took me eating almost 4,000 calories to gain 45lbs from a starting weight of 145lbs over a period of 9 months, and I'm just now stabilizing in weight at 190-195.

    Gaining/losing weight has everything to do with calorie intake. It's what that weight is (muscle or fat) that is determined by WHAT you eat and how much exercise you are getting.
    I'm not ruling out the possibility that I was scarfing down 3000 calories by eating a Wendy's meal instead of the 1400 they advertise... but I do know what I ate and the quantities I ate it in. I don't need fitday to tell me that a slice of toast with butter and grape jelly on it or a half-bowl of dried coco-puffs does not a 150-160 pound person's recommended calorie intake make. Let alone a 200 pound person, which is where I got to before I screamed 'enough'.

    I sucked. I truly, truly sucked. All I'm hoping for is that it's not too late to undo any damage I did to myself by being such a lazy fatass.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  21. #20
    Wannabebig New Member HahnB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockBoxer
    I'm not ruling out the possibility that I was scarfing down 3000 calories by eating a Wendy's meal instead of the 1400 they advertise... but I do know what I ate and the quantities I ate it in. I don't need fitday to tell me that a slice of toast with butter and grape jelly on it or a half-bowl of dried coco-puffs does not a 150-160 pound person's recommended calorie intake make. Let alone a 200 pound person, which is where I got to before I screamed 'enough'.

    I sucked. I truly, truly sucked. All I'm hoping for is that it's not too late to undo any damage I did to myself by being such a lazy fatass.
    What you're saying doesn't add up. According to what you ate to gain 55lbs it would be physically impossible for you to LOSE weight. If you gained 55lbs eating a slice of toast everyday, or 1 meal- then the only way for you to lose weight would be to not eat anything at all until you died.
    My brother and I were brutal. I once chased him around the house with a spoon that I put on the burner. I burned that little pricks leg. -sharkall2003

    Then I saw a little african boy sleeping, and I thought...that is little Okeke. he is tired from herding all the goats and the big goat got away today - Rock

  22. #21
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    Yet since I've increased my calories I've felt great and have lost weight.

    It doesn't have to make sense. It just is. I'm probably an alien or something.

    I suspect it was the Wendy's days more than the toast days that put the pounds on.
    Last edited by ShockBoxer; 08-02-2005 at 12:46 PM.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  23. #22
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    No doubt. Your basal metabolic rate would burn more than 1,200 calories daily. On days where I am sedentary I burn almost 3,000 calories at 190 lbs.
    5'9" 195 lbs
    DL 600x1
    SQ 490x1 (raw)
    BP 430x1 (shirted), 320x1 (raw)
    SN 209x1 C+J 250x1


    My Training Journal
    www.illinipowerlifting.org

    "Most people don't want to learn new things. They only want to hear about things that validate crap they're already doing." - Mike Boyle

  24. #23
    Om. Avocado. MM's Avatar
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    Yeah, I mean, forget gaining weight or maintaining weight, you're gonna lose weight if you're working out and only eating 1200 calories.
    Don't hate the player. Hate the game.


  25. #24
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    I know I only ate one meal a day (if that) and it wasn't 'biggie sized'. I guess if I never moved an inch a 1400 meal would pack on a pound every 10 weeks or so if my BMR was 1200? Takes a 3500 surplus to equal one pound, right? Or is it less...

    Of course, my mother gains weight rapidly when she only eats one little meal a day (a Michaelinas or whatever it's called ... frozen pasta dish) than when she eats three balanced ones. Like 20 pounds in two months. My sister as well. My brother eats everything in sight and keeps lean. My father's family has severe problems with obesity (hundred pound four year old girls who eat practically nothing). How big a role DO genetics play in this kind of thing?
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


    Stop thinking and go lift - Paul Stagg

  26. #25
    Wannabebig New Member HahnB's Avatar
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    Your body is burning a lot more than 1200 calories a day.
    My brother and I were brutal. I once chased him around the house with a spoon that I put on the burner. I burned that little pricks leg. -sharkall2003

    Then I saw a little african boy sleeping, and I thought...that is little Okeke. he is tired from herding all the goats and the big goat got away today - Rock

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