The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
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    Question about genetics

    Ok, ive heard alot about genetics helping you in weightlifting but i have a few questions.

    Do you get your muscle structure and muscle building genes ALL off your dad?

    Would your grandad have anything to do with your muscle building genes? (passed on, ect.)

    The last one is that my dad was in the army, so was his dad, for just over 12 years and after he came out he still went to the gym and jogged alot to keep the fitness he had when he was in there, so i was wondering how much will this help me build muscle on the genetic side?

    Cheers lads.
    Joe - Noob in training.

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  3. #2
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    what your granddad and your dad did in their lives is irrelevant. what kind of build did they have? or more importantly, can you describe your own build?
    delete this account

  4. #3
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    *I have posted this before, but I thought it might answer some of your questions. kw

    Human Genetics and Weight Training

    By Keith Wassung

    The subject of genetics and genetic potential has become a mainstream topic in recent years, largely due to the research and publicity of the Human Genome Project as well as publicity about DNA in high profile criminal cases. With all of the available information, there is still a great deal of mis-information among the public regarding the role of genetics for human beings. I am not an expert in the field of human genetics, but I have written extensively about it in my research articles entitled Human Genetic Potential and Chiropractic, Restoring the Balance: Hormones and the Endocrine System, and in my latest book Creation or Evolution: A Scientific Review, I devoted an entire chapter to genetics and DNA.

    Each of the 100 trillion cells in the human body (except red blood cells) contains the entire human genome-all of the genetic information necessary to build a human being. Inside the cell nucleus, 6 feet of DNA are packaged into 23 pairs of Chromosomes. As a carrier of information, DNA is 45 trillion times more efficient that the silicon computer mega-chip, which is manufactured by highly skilled engineers.

    Each gene is a double-stranded DNA that holds the blueprint for making a specific molecule-usually a protein. These blueprints are spelled out in varying sequences of four chemical bases in DNA, Adenine, Thymine, Guanine, and Cytosine, also known as A, T, G, C. If you could take the tiniest font on your computer, say a Times Roman #7, then decrease the size of that by about two-thirds, then using those letters to fill up an entire sheet (with no spaces) of 8.5 x 11” paper, it would take about one million pages to correctly spell out the sequence of the human genome. A printed manuscript of the human genome would require a stack of paper higher than the Washington Monument.

    It is a misconception to think that our genes are the predominant determining factor in who we are, or what form of accomplishment we are capable of. If our genes were the primary determining factor, then everyone who carried genetic disease traits would eventually develop that disease, but this is clearly not the case. Genes certainly provide a set or parameters, but research clearly shows that the way genes are expressed are far more important in determining our capabilities. This genetic expression is activated by way of hormonal chemicals that are directly controlled by the Central Nervous System. Hormones do not damage or alter genes; rather they cause the gene to act in a certain way, telling it when to reproduce or activate. If the nervous system is working properly, then the correct chemical message is sent to and received by the genes.
    The notion that genes work in response to the stimuli of the environment, via the CNS has been extensively written about in recent years.


    “The environment in which you grow up is as important as your DNA in determining the person you ultimately become. You cannot dissociate genes from the environment that turns genes on and off: and you cannot dissociate the effect of genes from the environment in which proteins exert their effects. Certain genes lead to vulnerability, but not inevitability”.1

    NEWSWEEK, April 20, 2000

    "For example, when geneticists say that have found a gene for a particular trait, what they mean is that people carrying a certain "allele" --a variation in a stretch of DNA that normally codes for a certain protein--will develop the given trait in a standard environment. The last words "standard environment”, are very important because what scientists are not saying is that a given allele will necessary lead to that trait in every environment. Indeed, there is mounting evidence that a particular allele will not produce the same result is the environment changes significantly; that is to say the environment has a strong influence on whether--and how--a gene gets "expressed" 2

    U.S. News and World Report 4-21-1997

    "Genes are unquestionably the fundamental units by which our bodies are constructed. However, pure genetic determinism does not adequately explain the varied capabilities of our biology. A more accurate view of the role of the genome is to see the genes as providing the overall plan for the developmental pathways. The actual pathways will be modified by the environment to which the individual is exposed" 3

    Dr. Peter Nathaniels, "Life in the Womb"


    The above citations lend credence to the notion that out genetics, though providing distinct parameters for our potential, pretty much respond to the stimulus and demand that we place on them. I frequently hear weight trainers make excuses for their progress by claiming that they do not possess good genetics. I often see this used as some sort of disclaimer in written articles. My question for them is “how do you know you do not have good genetics in advance”? There is not yet a single diagnostic test in existence that can accurately predict genetic capability. Many will cite “bone structure” as being genetically determined. Genetics may dictate length, ratios and skeletal insertions, but bone is living tissue that constantly remolds or reshapes itself in direct relation to the stress placed on it.





    According to Wolfs Law “Every change in the function of a bone is followed by certain definite changes in internal architecture and external conformation in accordance with mathematical laws. Wolf’s Law simply means that bones will change their shape and structure in response to how much or how little mechanical stress is applied.

    I know of literally thousands of people who built phenomenal and powerful physiques, and yet when they started they were the proverbial “98lb weakling” (including myself weighing 93lbs as a high school freshman). I believe that the majority of people who get involved in weight training do so because they are smaller or weaker than their peers. Having superior genetics can also be a disadvantage, though it is often self-inflicted. I grew up in Nebraska, whose college football team has a tremendous walk-on program. Each year hundreds of freshman athletes show up for the first day of practice. Every year there are numerous players who were 2 and 3 time All-State types, the type who was probably always bigger, faster and stronger than their peers, and probably had not worked nearly as hard in training. For the first time in their lives, they are not the top dog and many of them quit within the first week or so. I have seen countless number of athletes in the gym that seemed to possess all the physical traits needed to develop world-class strength and or physiques, but they rarely do it. The same is true for athletes in all sports and in the business world as well. (Do you really think Allan Iverson has a whole lot going for him in the way of genetics?) I will take the athlete with the “Rudy” type attitude, who has heart, soul and guts, than an athlete with all of the genetic advantages in the world whose personal drive and motivation was not as strong. Nature has a unique way of balancing things out. A taller person may not gain weight and strength nearly as rapidly as a shorter, stockier man, but when they do make the gains they look a lot better and more graceful. A taller person with long limbs rarely set bench press records, but they are usually excellent dead lifters. It would be foolish to state that genetics play no part in our developmental potential, they do, but they are so many other factors that come into play that it is not difficult to overcome most genetic situations. Work ethic, technique, intelligence, strategy, attitude, heart, persistence, discipline can all be maximized to achieve strength and development goals.

    I truly believe that we become whatever we set our minds to become. The majority of people who achieve great things do so because they had the drive, persistence, vision and dedication to do so. This is not only true in weight training but in all areas of our lives. Normal people just do not achieve great things, if they did, they would probably not be normal. There are not many long-term rewards in weight training and this may inhibit many from pursuing it at a level that would produce excellent strength or physique gains. I do believe that the vast majority of athletes who ever end up training in a gym have the capability of creating a body that would be absolutely mind-blowing to the average person. Their only limit is their own person drive, vision and dedication. As Henry Ford liked to say. “If you think you can, or think you can’t, either way you will be right”..



    Keith Wassung


    REFERENCES

    1. Sapolsky, Robert ( 2000, April 20) “All in the Genes” Newsweek
    2. Wray, Herbert (1997, April 21) “The Politics of Biology” US News & World Report
    3. Nathaniels, Peter, MD (1999) “Life in the Womb”. Ithaca, NY: Promethean Press

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wassung
    *I have posted this before, but I thought it might answer some of your questions. kw

    Human Genetics and Weight Training

    By Keith Wassung

    The subject of genetics and genetic potential has become a mainstream topic in recent years, largely due to the research and publicity of the Human Genome Project as well as publicity about DNA in high profile criminal cases. With all of the available information, there is still a great deal of mis-information among the public regarding the role of genetics for human beings. I am not an expert in the field of human genetics, but I have written extensively about it in my research articles entitled Human Genetic Potential and Chiropractic, Restoring the Balance: Hormones and the Endocrine System, and in my latest book Creation or Evolution: A Scientific Review, I devoted an entire chapter to genetics and DNA.

    Each of the 100 trillion cells in the human body (except red blood cells) contains the entire human genome-all of the genetic information necessary to build a human being. Inside the cell nucleus, 6 feet of DNA are packaged into 23 pairs of Chromosomes. As a carrier of information, DNA is 45 trillion times more efficient that the silicon computer mega-chip, which is manufactured by highly skilled engineers.

    Each gene is a double-stranded DNA that holds the blueprint for making a specific molecule-usually a protein. These blueprints are spelled out in varying sequences of four chemical bases in DNA, Adenine, Thymine, Guanine, and Cytosine, also known as A, T, G, C. If you could take the tiniest font on your computer, say a Times Roman #7, then decrease the size of that by about two-thirds, then using those letters to fill up an entire sheet (with no spaces) of 8.5 x 11” paper, it would take about one million pages to correctly spell out the sequence of the human genome. A printed manuscript of the human genome would require a stack of paper higher than the Washington Monument.

    It is a misconception to think that our genes are the predominant determining factor in who we are, or what form of accomplishment we are capable of. If our genes were the primary determining factor, then everyone who carried genetic disease traits would eventually develop that disease, but this is clearly not the case. Genes certainly provide a set or parameters, but research clearly shows that the way genes are expressed are far more important in determining our capabilities. This genetic expression is activated by way of hormonal chemicals that are directly controlled by the Central Nervous System. Hormones do not damage or alter genes; rather they cause the gene to act in a certain way, telling it when to reproduce or activate. If the nervous system is working properly, then the correct chemical message is sent to and received by the genes.
    The notion that genes work in response to the stimuli of the environment, via the CNS has been extensively written about in recent years.


    “The environment in which you grow up is as important as your DNA in determining the person you ultimately become. You cannot dissociate genes from the environment that turns genes on and off: and you cannot dissociate the effect of genes from the environment in which proteins exert their effects. Certain genes lead to vulnerability, but not inevitability”.1

    NEWSWEEK, April 20, 2000

    "For example, when geneticists say that have found a gene for a particular trait, what they mean is that people carrying a certain "allele" --a variation in a stretch of DNA that normally codes for a certain protein--will develop the given trait in a standard environment. The last words "standard environment”, are very important because what scientists are not saying is that a given allele will necessary lead to that trait in every environment. Indeed, there is mounting evidence that a particular allele will not produce the same result is the environment changes significantly; that is to say the environment has a strong influence on whether--and how--a gene gets "expressed" 2

    U.S. News and World Report 4-21-1997

    "Genes are unquestionably the fundamental units by which our bodies are constructed. However, pure genetic determinism does not adequately explain the varied capabilities of our biology. A more accurate view of the role of the genome is to see the genes as providing the overall plan for the developmental pathways. The actual pathways will be modified by the environment to which the individual is exposed" 3

    Dr. Peter Nathaniels, "Life in the Womb"


    The above citations lend credence to the notion that out genetics, though providing distinct parameters for our potential, pretty much respond to the stimulus and demand that we place on them. I frequently hear weight trainers make excuses for their progress by claiming that they do not possess good genetics. I often see this used as some sort of disclaimer in written articles. My question for them is “how do you know you do not have good genetics in advance”? There is not yet a single diagnostic test in existence that can accurately predict genetic capability. Many will cite “bone structure” as being genetically determined. Genetics may dictate length, ratios and skeletal insertions, but bone is living tissue that constantly remolds or reshapes itself in direct relation to the stress placed on it.





    According to Wolfs Law “Every change in the function of a bone is followed by certain definite changes in internal architecture and external conformation in accordance with mathematical laws. Wolf’s Law simply means that bones will change their shape and structure in response to how much or how little mechanical stress is applied.

    I know of literally thousands of people who built phenomenal and powerful physiques, and yet when they started they were the proverbial “98lb weakling” (including myself weighing 93lbs as a high school freshman). I believe that the majority of people who get involved in weight training do so because they are smaller or weaker than their peers. Having superior genetics can also be a disadvantage, though it is often self-inflicted. I grew up in Nebraska, whose college football team has a tremendous walk-on program. Each year hundreds of freshman athletes show up for the first day of practice. Every year there are numerous players who were 2 and 3 time All-State types, the type who was probably always bigger, faster and stronger than their peers, and probably had not worked nearly as hard in training. For the first time in their lives, they are not the top dog and many of them quit within the first week or so. I have seen countless number of athletes in the gym that seemed to possess all the physical traits needed to develop world-class strength and or physiques, but they rarely do it. The same is true for athletes in all sports and in the business world as well. (Do you really think Allan Iverson has a whole lot going for him in the way of genetics?) I will take the athlete with the “Rudy” type attitude, who has heart, soul and guts, than an athlete with all of the genetic advantages in the world whose personal drive and motivation was not as strong. Nature has a unique way of balancing things out. A taller person may not gain weight and strength nearly as rapidly as a shorter, stockier man, but when they do make the gains they look a lot better and more graceful. A taller person with long limbs rarely set bench press records, but they are usually excellent dead lifters. It would be foolish to state that genetics play no part in our developmental potential, they do, but they are so many other factors that come into play that it is not difficult to overcome most genetic situations. Work ethic, technique, intelligence, strategy, attitude, heart, persistence, discipline can all be maximized to achieve strength and development goals.

    I truly believe that we become whatever we set our minds to become. The majority of people who achieve great things do so because they had the drive, persistence, vision and dedication to do so. This is not only true in weight training but in all areas of our lives. Normal people just do not achieve great things, if they did, they would probably not be normal. There are not many long-term rewards in weight training and this may inhibit many from pursuing it at a level that would produce excellent strength or physique gains. I do believe that the vast majority of athletes who ever end up training in a gym have the capability of creating a body that would be absolutely mind-blowing to the average person. Their only limit is their own person drive, vision and dedication. As Henry Ford liked to say. “If you think you can, or think you can’t, either way you will be right”..



    Keith Wassung


    REFERENCES

    1. Sapolsky, Robert ( 2000, April 20) “All in the Genes” Newsweek
    2. Wray, Herbert (1997, April 21) “The Politics of Biology” US News & World Report
    3. Nathaniels, Peter, MD (1999) “Life in the Womb”. Ithaca, NY: Promethean Press
    Wow, great read, cheers for that mate .
    Joe - Noob in training.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattanshrager
    what your granddad and your dad did in their lives is irrelevant. what kind of build did they have? or more importantly, can you describe your own build?
    I realy dont know my grandads build, he died before i was born with lung cancer and i have only a picture of him with my nan which realy doesnt show his build, so thats out the question.

    My dad on the other hand had a few pictures before his accident which stopped his fitness all together and was very similar build to antek on this forum, infact by his recent pictures id say they were more or less the same structure and physiqe, bigger chest though id say.
    Yes he was very athletic but i know thats because of the army training and the amount of running and stuff they do in there realy doesnt make you the kind of big bastards build like sh** houses you see around in gyms and stuff these days.

    I dont have any pictures of him or myself unfourtantly because of the fact that i have no scanner or webcam, but i am getting a cam in a few weeks so expect to see some progress pictures of me in the near future on this forum.
    Joe - Noob in training.

  7. #6
    Wrecker of Homes d'Anconia's Avatar
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    Lung cancer and "accidents"... if I were you I'd start worrying more about the curse that seems to have been laid down onto the males in your family.

    No but seriously are you not able to ask your mother what your father looked like build-wise before his accident and same thing with your grandfather?
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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    Lung cancer and "accidents"... if I were you I'd start worrying more about the curse that seems to have been laid down onto the males in your family.

    No but seriously are you not able to ask your mother what your father looked like build-wise before his accident and same thing with your grandfather?
    lol true that :P

    Dont need to ask about my dad, though i might aswell even though ive saw his body in the pictures.
    Ah yes, was about to ask about my mom what my grandad looked like but its on my dads side and he died before my mom could see him, so il ask my dad, though hes out atm :|
    Last edited by JoeW; 08-12-2005 at 10:00 AM.
    Joe - Noob in training.

  9. #8
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    That was a very unscientifc article trying to address a very scientific topic. I don't think US News and World is exactly a highly credible reference when it comes to science. If the paper was based off of published research it probably could've made a stronger arguement.

    Personally I think the author is highly downplaying the role of genetics in physical ability, or any ability, for that matter. He seems to suggest that anyone can become anything they want if they only put their mind to it. I disagree. There are people out there who may bust their ass in a sport yet will never make it to the next level of competition (college, pro, whatever). He also seems to ignore the fact that many elite athletes do train to their maximum potential and do have all the heart and guts he refers to in the article.

    I think the role of genetics in muscle building ability, as well as genetics in general, is a very interesting topic though, despite the fact that we don't seem to know much about it. Hopefully we can keep this discussion going.

    My $.02 (bored at work)

  10. #9
    Senior Member CiteCollegiale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeW
    Do you get your muscle structure and muscle building genes ALL off your dad?
    No you don't get your genes ALL from your fathers side. I resemble my mothers side alot and thankfully there's alot of big guys on that side of the family ^^

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialK
    That was a very unscientifc article trying to address a very scientific topic. I don't think US News and World is exactly a highly credible reference when it comes to science. If the paper was based off of published research it probably could've made a stronger arguement.

    Personally I think the author is highly downplaying the role of genetics in physical ability, or any ability, for that matter. He seems to suggest that anyone can become anything they want if they only put their mind to it. I disagree. There are people out there who may bust their ass in a sport yet will never make it to the next level of competition (college, pro, whatever). He also seems to ignore the fact that many elite athletes do train to their maximum potential and do have all the heart and guts he refers to in the article.

    I think the role of genetics in muscle building ability, as well as genetics in general, is a very interesting topic though, despite the fact that we don't seem to know much about it. Hopefully we can keep this discussion going.

    My $.02 (bored at work)
    Yeah, a very intresting topic indeed but the question is, how much would my dad being in the army actually help me?
    Joe - Noob in training.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CiteCollegiale
    No you don't get your genes ALL from your fathers side. I resemble my mothers side alot and thankfully there's alot of big guys on that side of the family ^^
    Cheers, my mom is very veiny so hopefully il turn out with some good vascularity when i get my BF% down
    Joe - Noob in training.

  13. #12
    Wrecker of Homes d'Anconia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeW
    Yeah, a very intresting topic indeed but the question is, how much would my dad being in the army actually help me?
    Technically I don't think that it would help one bit... Are you sure that you understand how genetics work?
    ...........||High School||.....||July '05||.......||January '09||
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    Weight........180...................192...................185
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  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialK
    That was a very unscientifc article trying to address a very scientific topic. I don't think US News and World is exactly a highly credible reference when it comes to science. If the paper was based off of published research it probably could've made a stronger arguement.

    Personally I think the author is highly downplaying the role of genetics in physical ability, or any ability, for that matter. He seems to suggest that anyone can become anything they want if they only put their mind to it. I disagree. There are people out there who may bust their ass in a sport yet will never make it to the next level of competition (college, pro, whatever). He also seems to ignore the fact that many elite athletes do train to their maximum potential and do have all the heart and guts he refers to in the article.

    I think the role of genetics in muscle building ability, as well as genetics in general, is a very interesting topic though, despite the fact that we don't seem to know much about it. Hopefully we can keep this discussion going.

    My $.02 (bored at work)
    I tend to agree, I would be surprised if I could have been 6' or higher if only my environment was different as I was growings. The shape of my calves with their long tendons gives them great shape but when flexed but tends to make them look pretty small otherwise. Can I put a lot of mass and muscle on this body, definitely but a lot of the shape I believe was genetic.

    My $.02 worth.

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  15. #14
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    your dad being in the army doesnt mean ****. find out ecto, endo, and mesomorphic traits in your family, see whats dominant. look in the mirror. what kind of body do you have. start lifting and eating, see how well your body progresses, how fast your recovering. i dont know what else man but bottom line...whatever your parents did in their lives wont do jack for you now.
    delete this account

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeW
    Yeah, a very intresting topic indeed but the question is, how much would my dad being in the army actually help me?
    It would help you not at all.

    Being in the army didn't alter your father's DNA. (Hopefully!)
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  17. #16
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    Ok cheers guys, i apreciate it. time to go work out methinks.
    Thanks alot
    Joe - Noob in training.

  18. #17
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeW
    Do you get your muscle structure and muscle building genes ALL off your dad?
    This question TOTALLY cracked me up.

    Yes. You do. The mother is merely a vessel.

  19. #18
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    As far as I can tell the only trait I got from my mother's side is red hair and pale skin. My brother gets to be dark haired and perma-tanned, and my sister gets to be red haired and perma-tanned... what do I get? Burned to a crisp in 10 minutes!

    This never would have happened if genetics had never been invented! Stupid scientists...

    Joe, you're young. Real young. Eat right and work out right and you won't even resemble your family at the end... just resemble what they could have become but didn't.
    The Reconstruction Project (Journal)

    Age: 34, Height: 5'4, Weight: 185, BF: somewhere between 15 and 45%

    Weightlifting Start Date: July 26, 2005 - Bench 95 x 6, Dead 110 x 8, Smith Squat 180 x 8
    Bests: Bench 185 x 8, Dead 400 x 1, Zercher Squat 295 x 3


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  20. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    This question TOTALLY cracked me up.

    Yes. You do. The mother is merely a vessel.

    Please tell me that you are joking

    You inherit genetic traits from both of your parents.

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  22. #21
    Where's all the 45s ?!?! Wierz's Avatar
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    Moms give you mitochondria! Quite essential to being alive and stuff.


    And I'm a believer in nurture over nature. Will I ever be a 6'3" mountain of muscle? No, because I'm done growing and I'm only 5'10"

    But I can be a 5'10" large hill of muscle if I put in the effort, time, and determination to make myself that way. And that will be good enough for me.
    Last edited by Wierz; 08-12-2005 at 01:03 PM. Reason: ... 'cause I'm an idiot
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  23. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wierz
    And I'm a believer in nurture over nature.
    And in what units can you measure the impact of nature or nurture? Your entire human body was given to you because of nature...

    Don't get me wrong nurture can have a big impact but I think it pales in comparison to nature.
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  24. #23
    Professional hobbit Focused70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    No!

    The things I learn on this board!
    It's like tabula rasa sometimes.
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  25. #24
    Where's all the 45s ?!?! Wierz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    And in what units can you measure the impact of nature or nurture? Your entire human body was given to you because of nature...

    Don't get me wrong nurture can have a big impact but I think it pales in comparison to nature.
    Very simplified to shorten the post...

    I eat 4500 calories a day, mostly McDonalds. Spend all my spare time either sitting watching tv or sleeping. I do nothing active other than go to work. I end up a fat slob, severely overweight.

    I eat 4500 calories a day, mostly from clean sources with little saturated fats. I spend at least half my spare time lifting and doing cardio. I end up in much better shape with my body in a completely different state physically.

    The constant between those two scenarios is my genetics. They don't change. Even if I ended up a fat slob, I would still have the potential to turn my body and life around and change my physical appearance and abilities. The potential is always there. Whether you apply the correct stimuli to reach that potential (nurture) is a matter of choice.

    Like I said above, will I ever be 6'3" and huge? No, because I'm locked into my height because of a combination of genetics and environmental factors as I was growing up. But if I did become severely overweight, my body would not, on it's own, decide to change my body into that which I would have if I had followed scenario #2.

    In my opinion, this comes close to the debate of hardgainers. Looking at me, most people familiar with the term would label me a hardgainer. However, I don't believe in that term. In my experience, having once thought I WAS a hardgainer, there is no such thing. Hardgainers, imo, are people who work out correctly, and eat incorrectly. It's not a matter of "genetically they just have a faster metabolism" it's a matter of "they haven't applied the correct stimuli to reach their maximum potential".

    Now, does genetics limit absolute maximum potential. Most likely, I don't know enough to say. I DO know that everyone is capable of vast improvements to their body with proper stimuli.

    To relate this back to the original poster Do you get your genetics potential from your mother or father? - it doesn't matter. The potential to have the body you want is there. You just have to learn the what/when/how of things to get it.
    Last edited by Wierz; 08-12-2005 at 02:09 PM.
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  26. #25
    Wrecker of Homes d'Anconia's Avatar
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    You know if one of the 25,000 (I believe that's the #) genes in your DNA becomes mutated that a good amount of the time you either a.) die, b.) end up with a life-changing condition, or c.) start your own species.

    Basically there are genes for anything, including your BRAIN which is what will later tell you whether you should lift or not, etc.

    But it actually looks like you are speaking within the context of lifting and I'd agree with you that nurture has a huge impact on that. No one is gonna just become super-huge because of genetics without lifting.
    ...........||High School||.....||July '05||.......||January '09||
    Bench.........225x1...............275x1.................?
    Squat...........?.......................?....................365x5
    Deadlift........?.....................315x5...............435x5
    Weight........180...................192...................185
    BF%.............?......................12.....................12
    Time to Get Ripped
    Pictures of Me

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