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Thread: Should I add direct grip training into my routine?

  1. #1
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    Should I add direct grip training into my routine?

    Currently, my routine is as follows:

    ~Sunday~
    -Speed Bench
    -Military BB Press

    ~Monday~
    -Heavy Squats
    -Speed Deadlifts
    -SLDLs

    ~Wednesday~
    -Heavy Bench
    -Dips
    -DB Flies

    ~Friday~
    -Heavy Deadlifts
    -Speed Squats
    -Chinups
    -Yates Rows

    Today I was doing SLDLs @ 200 lbs. with a mixed grip. I did my first set of 8 reps, then on my second set, I was pulling rep #8 but my grip failed before I locked out, so I definitely know that I need to start training my grip somehow. I am planning to get Captains of Crush grippers but I doubt that is enough. What should I add to my routine for grip strength?
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  2. #2
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    You should not worry about the little things unless they are really hindering the big things.

    Before you worry about working grip, use the full range of helpers mixed grip, chalk, eco-ball, etc. Failing at rep 8 isn't such a big deal.

    Do a few static holds with slightly more than your working deadlift weight on a non-grip day, for slightly longer than you take for a complete set of deads.

    Edit: grippers won't help your static hold strength much at all; try farmers walks with dumbbells.
    Last edited by MixmasterNash; 08-22-2005 at 10:35 PM.

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  3. #3
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MixmasterNash

    Edit: grippers won't help your static hold strength much at all; try farmers walks with dumbbells.

    The fastest way to improve a lift is to correct the weaknesses involved. Grippers are a great tool to increase static strength endurance and static strength of the hand. Something that is often overlooked when it comes to increasing ones grip.

    Think about it for a second, you're working on improving a vital link (the hands) that are connected to the bar. Without adequate strength qualities you're doomed no mater how strong the other muscles are. If your grip is lacking how can you apply maximum force to the bar? You can't. The stronger your grip is the greater the force you'll be able to apply to the bar. This is why many experts tell you to squeeze the life out of a bar when bench pressing.

    Grippers work on dynamic hand strength as well as static strength. Something that can not achieved by simply gripping a bar.
    Last edited by Maki Riddington; 08-22-2005 at 11:30 PM.
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    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
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  4. #4
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    wow in a week your lifts really made a great jump.. congratulation =)

  5. #5
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maki Riddington
    The fastest way to improve a lift is to correct the weaknesses involved. Grippers are a great tool to increase static strength endurance and static strength of the hand. Something that is often overlooked when it comes to increasing ones grip.

    Think about it for a second, you're working on improving a vital link (the hands) that are connected to the bar. Without adequate strength qualities you're doomed no mater how strong the other muscles are. If your grip is lacking how can you apply maximum force to the bar? You can't. The stronger your grip is the greater the force you'll be able to apply to the bar. This is why many experts tell you to squeeze the life out of a bar when bench pressing.

    Grippers work on dynamic hand strength as well as static strength. Something that can not achieved by simply gripping a bar.
    I disagree completely. You're confusing types of grip strength, which are simply not the same. Grippers have little to do with static strength, such as holding a bar. Grippers are good in their own right, but not the most efficient way to improve lifting (static bar) grip strength. I can think of many other grip exercises that are significantly more useful for improving static strength, particularly: farmers walks, thick bar gripping, and thumbless static holds.

    I would even rate pinching above crushing, but I think both are not very useful for holding a bar.

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  6. #6
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    I disagree completely. You're confusing types of grip strength, which are simply not the same.
    MixmasterNash,

    I'm talking about training the hands which are a weak link in the deadlift. To overcome the load the bar imposes on the lifters hands you must train the hands in a specific manner. Two of the main strength variables that should be looked at are, static strength (isometric action) which works on increasing absolute strength. And, static strength endurance which allows the lifter to hold onto the bar for a longer period of time. I'm not confusing anything.

    Grippers have little to do with static strength, such as holding a bar.
    You have not explained why they have little to do with gripping the bar so I will explain why you should use them.

    When you close a gripper you are doing several things.

    1. You are exterting force against an object which is an isometric action.
    2. You are resisting the force of the grippers from opening which is something a bar does not do.
    3. You are working on static strength enduance if you keep the grippers closed for a certain amount of time.

    Crushing strength is a very vital part of deadlift training as I mentioned in a previous post. Instead of posting coments such as "I disagree," it would be helpful if you took the time to explain your points by giving some specific information as to why my statements are not true. You have not made mention of anything tha refutes my statements.
    Last edited by Maki Riddington; 08-23-2005 at 01:19 AM.
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    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  7. #7
    Where's all the 45s ?!?! Wierz's Avatar
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    Hey Fix,

    Here's something that helped me increase my grip strength without it being considered "direct" training, I guess.

    I included heavy barbell shrugs in my routine. The weak part of this exercise for me was grip strength (but mostly grip endurance) and I feel as soon as I started doing these, my grip strength/endurance well surpassed what I needed it to be. I really tried to concentrate on holding onto the bar as long as possible while repping the shrugs - I did it in a rack for this reason in case I dropped the bar. I put the shrugs on shoulder day because it was the farthest from back day (which included deadlifts).

    Spacing out exercises that worked grip throughout my routine during the week helped me alot. Maybe you could try that rather than a specific grip exercise.
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  8. #8
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    I used to have a weak grip [or I thought it was weak], until I started weightlifting. I think just carrying the DBs around from one corner of the gym to the place I'm working did it for me. My friends and family have noticed the difference because when I shake peoples hands I automatically like start crushing them because I'm so use to gripping DBs. I use DB for like 80% of the excercises I do.

    So yea I think it helped me; I'm not too keen on buying **** for the small stuff, not sayin it wont work but I just dont feel the need to go out and buy the best damn grippers evermade with 'jet airplane wheel rubber lining and hydro[insert latin prefix here] for maximum cooling and anti friction polymer'.

    Trust me as soon as you start sweating the small **** you'll start becoming nitpicky as hell and will buy like every**** out there that promises iron strength grip. I agree with Nash that loosing grip on the 8th rep isnt alarming. It'll come with time ya know.
    Last edited by Pasha; 08-23-2005 at 07:58 AM.

  9. #9
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maki Riddington
    When you close a gripper you are doing several things.

    1. You are exterting force against an object which is an isometric action.
    2. You are resisting the force of the grippers from opening which is something a bar does not do.
    3. You are working on static strength enduance if you keep the grippers closed for a certain amount of time.

    Crushing strength is a very vital part of deadlift training as I mentioned in a previous post. Instead of posting coments such as "I disagree," it would be helpful if you took the time to explain your points by giving some specific information as to why my statements are not true. You have not made mention of anything tha refutes my statements.
    I've never heard anyone describe crushing strength as vital to a deadlift. A cursory search on the gripboard shows that almost everyone there says there is little correlation between crushing and static bar gripping.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clay Edgin, certified Captain of Crush
    I think there's a limited carry-over. Fred Cordova, the winner of this year's California Strongest Man, said he used to train with the grippers for a while but didn't really find that they carried over to his training very well. He says, and I agree, that "closing grippers is good for one thing - closing grippers." I find that there is a little carryover to the events like the farmers walk and barbell holds. If you can squeeze shut a #3 and hold it for 10-20 seconds at a time, your ability to hang on to a 250lb farmer's walk implement is increased.

    Addressing your points:
    1) closing grippers is NOT an isometric action
    2) exactly, but this is not how a bar behaves at all; you are resisting a bar rolling out of your hand
    3) holding grippers closed is better for improving static strength than crushing them, to be sure, as edgin points out; however, static strength endurance can be improved more rapidly via the other methods I mentioned, specifically farmers walks, thick bar work, and finger rolls

    I'm not saying to not use grippers. I own six of them. I like them a lot. But they are not the best way to improve static gripping strength. I am using grippers because I am very weak at crushing but relatively strong at static gripping.

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  10. #10
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    I've never heard anyone describe crushing strength as vital to a deadlift. A cursory search on the gripboard shows that almost everyone there says there is little correlation between crushing and static bar gripping.
    It has to do with force application. If you don' undersand this, I suggest you go do some reading about applying force and the relationship betwen varying strength qualities. Just because you can' find specific info off another board does not mean it isn't true.






    1) closing grippers is NOT an isometric action
    The initial part is not, but the act of keeping them closed is.

    2) exactly, but this is not how a bar behaves at all; you are resisting a bar rolling out of your hand
    Fair enough.

    3) holding grippers closed is better for improving static strength than crushing them, to be sure, as edgin points out;
    Grippers an be used for boh, granted you have a couple different strengths on hand. The at of closing a gripper is what increases crushing power and keeping them closed is what works on static endurance strength.

    however, static strength endurance can be improved more rapidly via the other methods I mentioned, specifically farmers walks, thick bar work, and finger rolls
    Please explain, don' just state. I can say the same things without actually giving a proper explanation, however these types of staements hold no weight.




    But they are not the best way to improve static gripping strength.
    I said they were a "great tool" not the best way.
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    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  11. #11
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    DNL- Thanks. I ate lots of food and it really does help you to accomplish a lot.

    Wierz/Pasha- Thanks for your suggestions, I might try some of those.

    Mix/Maki- Thanks for posting, guys. Interesting stuff. I'm probably going to put some farmer walks into my routine, but I still want to get Captains of Crush (even though they're not the best for static holding strength) because the thought of breaking people's hands when I give them a handshake is so cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  12. #12
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maki Riddington
    It has to do with force application. If you don' undersand this, I suggest you go do some reading about applying force and the relationship betwen varying strength qualities. Just because you can' find specific info off another board does not mean it isn't true.
    I understand force application just fine, and I think you're overstating the relevance to the current case.

    If you don't think that one of the strongest grippers in the world, posting on the top gripping site in the world, and quoting a championship strongman is good enough, then I don't think anything I say can possibly convince you. Basically everyone on the gripboard agrees that there is "limited" or "little" carry-over between gripper work and static bar holds, including dozens of people with more grip strength than the two of us combined.

    --

    To fixation, ignore us, and:
    Use grippers, they're good fun and will help forearm hypertrophy. To improve your bar gripping, work it like anything else, changing the parameters around which you typically do grip work. E.g. with 200lb for 8, try static holds with more weight for less time, and slightly less weight for more time. Try double overhand gripping with less weight. Try thick bar gripping. Try farmers walk -- in particular, these create a jostling movement of the weights that you will have to resist, but while keeping an static grip.

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    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    Alright thanks. Also, I've heard from some guys on another board that when doing Farmer's Walks it's best to walk in zig-zags because this causes you to have to stabilize the dumbbells more with your arms and body, resulting in a better overall workout or something like that? How do you do it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  14. #14
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    I understand force application just fine, and I think you're overstating the relevance to the current case.
    Then make your points. Don't just tell me.

    If you don't think that one of the strongest grippers in the world, posting on the top gripping site in the world, and quoting a championship strongman is good enough, then I don't think anything I say can possibly convince you.
    Just because someone says something does not mean I'm going to believe them. If a world class sprinter told me that the best way to developing an explosive start is through the use of plyometrics, should I believe him/her based on their status?

    If you can explain to me why my line of thinking is incorrect I will gladly debate the issue with you. I can not do so if you do not provide me with a proper explanation. You are quoting someone else and lending support to your own beliefs through the words of others. If you understood what we are disscussing you wouldn't have to quote other people. I could very well quote some top strength coaches but if I can not explain my reasoning myself then what good is it for me to state my opinion?

    Conclusion: Grippers are a valuable tool considering the type of strength qualities they work on improving which are associated with deadlifting.
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    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
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  15. #15
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    Heavy dumbbell shrugs (with a closed fist grip) helped me the most with my grip strength.

  16. #16
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maki Riddington
    Conclusion: Grippers are a valuable tool considering the type of strength qualities they work on improving which are associated with deadlifting.
    No, this simply does not follow.

    Grippers are known to be among the LEAST valuable tools for improving deadlifting-related grip. I've quoted for you the opinion of experts. Fine, you won't accept what they are saying. Why not? You don't believe what world class, elite grip strength athletes are saying? If the great majority of successful, world class sprinters and coaches had success with one method or another, why wouldn't you believe them?

    From a grip perspective:
    John Brookfield suggests using grippers as a WARMUP before a strength session to develop grip for powerlifting, but they are not part of the training. What does he suggest, instead? Surprise, surprise: Thick bar work and more thick bar work.

    From a powerlifting perspective:
    On his 2003 deadlift routine DVD, Louie Simmons notes that Westside routines do not include gripper work because they are not considered effective ways to build the grip strength required for power lifting. Guess what he does recommend? Thick bar, one handed deadlifts.

    And seriously, if you're going to doubt Brookfield or Simmons, you will never be convinced. They are two of the top coaches in their respective fields. Give me one reason not to listen to them.

    The reasons for their positions are simple, physiological ones: You train isometric strength by developing isometric strength, not dynamic strength. The notion that holding grippers closed is comparable to bar gripping is simply wrong, as the torque action of a bar is significantly dfferent from the spreading action of a gripper; indeed, such static closes are, as I have quoted grip experts as saying, of "limited" use.

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  17. #17
    still dislikes Art Atwood Hatred's Avatar
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    I wish my place had a thick bar.
    Hmm. Thumbless Static holds, Farmers walks. I have a newfound obsession with Forearms so this interests me.
    I have to admit this is the first time that I have heard anyone say to crush the bar when benching. I always heard that squeezing unecessarily causes strength loss.
    How in the hell do you guys have the time to look for and read all these articles that keep popping up?
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  18. #18
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatred
    I wish my place had a thick bar.
    Hmm. Thumbless Static holds, Farmers walks. I have a newfound obsession with Forearms so this interests me.
    I have to admit this is the first time that I have heard anyone say to crush the bar when benching. I always heard that squeezing unecessarily causes strength loss.
    How in the hell do you guys have the time to look for and read all these articles that keep popping up?
    Thumbless Static holds, Farmers walks. == strong isometric grip, not big forearms

    Grippers, wrist curls, hammer curls, levering == big forearms, good at movement

    You'll note that, in general, dynamic motion strength is more highly correlated with size than isometric strength.

    "crushing" the bar when benching is a pretty well known idea; Pavel tsa-whatever is a big proponent. It has little or nothing to do with grip strength though, and everthing to do with power transfer.

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  19. #19
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maki Riddington
    Conclusion: Grippers are a valuable tool considering the type of strength qualities they work on improving which are associated with deadlifting.
    Maki,
    Yes, grippers can be used to develop static holding strength, but, as you admit, they are probably not the best method for developing it...

    Fix,
    Add another exercise into your routine somewhere that works your static grip (for example, chins on your back day). Also, use a overhand grip for as many sets as you can. I don't think you probably need to do much more than that to improve your grip.
    Grip is important, but most people don't need much specialized work on it to improve their deadlift. Rickey Dale Crain, a world-record holding powerlifter, has said many times that even with small hands, no direct work, and (in his opinion) not a particularly strong grip, he was still able to pull amazing poundages.
    IMHO, if you really want to do a lot of reps w. deadlifts, just use straps - you'll be able to keep an overhand grip that way and it will put a lot less uneccessary stress on your bicep tendon and less torque on your spine.
    Last edited by Sensei; 08-23-2005 at 03:39 PM.

  20. #20
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    You know, when i'm doing deadlifts, the last thing I want to think about is my grip. I focus on the muscles the deadlift is designed to work and form. THAT's it!!
    I use straps...because i don't have time to think about if my grip is going to break on my 8th rep or not.
    I also use straps for almost all back/pull lifts because I can seriously work the back 100% better because i don't have to worry about my hands giving out when my back can keep going.

  21. #21
    Fatass Powerlifter tholian8's Avatar
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    I would recommend static holds if you are trying to improve barbell grip. Alternate them--do one series in a mixed grip same as your DL grip, and one series in an overhand grip. You only need to do this once a week. Twice a week won't kill you, but don't do it more than that.

    However, I see nothing wrong with using straps if your main focus is on gaining muscle, rather than on competition lifting or general strength training. Just keep an eye on how your grip is on your deadlifts, and do grip work as necessary to bring it up.
    "The female of the species is more deadly than the male."

    My attempts at lifting heavy objects

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    Squat 145 kg (320 lbs)
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  22. #22
    Fatass Powerlifter tholian8's Avatar
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    Addendum/clarification: I don't recommend using straps on a mixed-grip deadlift from the floor, or on mixed-grip rack pulls. If something goes wrong during the lift it's too hard to release the straps. I do recommend them as an assistance for overhand-grip DL's, as long as you work your grip for your mixed-grip exercises and use chalk where necessary.
    "The female of the species is more deadly than the male."

    My attempts at lifting heavy objects

    Current maxes:

    Squat 145 kg (320 lbs)
    Bench 67.5 kg (149 lbs)
    DL: 142.5 kg (314 lbs)

    ...oh, and I'm a girl.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatred
    I have to admit this is the first time that I have heard anyone say to crush the bar when benching. I always heard that squeezing unecessarily causes strength loss.
    How in the hell do you guys have the time to look for and read all these articles that keep popping up?
    Gripping harder increases strength.

    Pavel Tsatsouline's "Power to the People" (and others) talk about the importance of tension when lifting and when you are loose, you are "leaking" strength. He also talks about "irradiation" of strength from neighboring muscle groups. Good stuff really. His books are expensive, but IMHO insightful and worth it.

    A lot of benchers try to rip the bar apart to maintain upper back, shoulder and arm stability during the movement.

  24. #24
    still dislikes Art Atwood Hatred's Avatar
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    Go figger.Nash-what the hell is "levering"?
    Out of the night that covers me,Black as the Pit from pole to pole,I thank whatever gods may be for my unconquerable soul. In The fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears looms but the horror of the shade And yet the menace of the years finds, and shall find, me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate how charged with punishments the scroll,I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
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  25. #25
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    Grippers are known to be among the LEAST valuable tools for improving deadlifting-related grip. I've quoted for you the opinion of experts. Fine, you won't accept what they are saying. Why not? You don't believe what world class, elite grip strength athletes are saying? If the great majority of successful, world class sprinters and coaches had success with one method or another, why wouldn't you believe them?
    It's not that I don't accept their word, I simply choose not to believe something just because. I'm sure you are familiar with the saying, their is more than one way to skin a cat. I truely believe that just because a lot of people say something, does not mean that it is the best way. many lifters share the sentiment that Westside is one of the best approaches to increasing max strength? Well, this is debateable. There are many other ways out there that are just as good, it's all in the application.



    John Brookfield suggests using grippers as a WARMUP before a strength session to develop grip for powerlifting, but they are not part of the training. What does he suggest, instead? Surprise, surprise: Thick bar work and more thick bar work.

    On his 2003 deadlift routine DVD, Louie Simmons notes that Westside routines do not include gripper work because they are not considered effective ways to build the grip strength required for power lifting. Guess what he does recommend? Thick bar, one handed deadlifts.
    Again, what he says is what he suggests but it is not necessarily the most effective way. If you are familiar with the many types of training approaches you'll understand that just because one method isn't referenced doesn't make it any less effective. His reference is based upon his experiences which can be seen as a guide to those who work in the training field.

    In Supertraining there is a plethora of information which has been referenced by numerous strength coaches in a wide number of articles, books, and magazines. These coaches took the underlying principles from the book and molded them into their own training systems based on Dr Siff's work. The same applys with what I'm saying. I very familiar with what thick grips can do and the various types of exercises one can use to train the grip. But as I have now mentioned a couple times, ifyou look at the qualities involved I feel they match up with what the grippers can do in terms of increasing hand strength.

    I have explained how grippers can be a valuable tool (not the best) yet you keep telling me that this and that expert says differently. I'm sure they have gone into a bit of detail as to why they are not so effective. But you haven't told me. You've just quoted and quoted and then told me that I'm wrong.

    For those who need to follow something because they do not know any better his suggestions are gold. You're initial comment was that grippers are ineffective tools when it comes to increasing hand strength. Is this because you read this somewhere or is it because you truely understand why they are ineffective?

    Btw, just because one or two experts deem something ineffective does not mean they are right and everyone else is misinformed. Both Louie Simmons and Dr Siff did not agree on a lot of things. So what then, is one wrong and the other right?


    The reasons for their positions are simple, physiological ones: You train isometric strength by developing isometric strength, not dynamic strength. The notion that holding grippers closed is comparable to bar gripping is simply wrong, as the torque action of a bar is significantly dfferent from the spreading action of a gripper; indeed, such static closes are, as I have quoted grip experts as saying, of "limited" use.
    I was wrong to imply that thick bar training was of no use. I do think though that even though grippers allow for dynamic movement to occur they can still be used quite effectively at increasing crushing power, static and static endurance strength. I'm also aware that gripperas are not the end all be all when it comes to training for grip. You need to look at a number of things. I'm just disagreeing that they are of limited use.
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    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
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