The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    The Body Never Lies Nosaj's Avatar
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    Squat failure safety?

    Okay, so I've really been making an effort lately to get my form down on squats, and now that I feel I have done that, I'm starting to up the weight. I've started using the enclosed rack (not sure the name for it exactly) and put the moveable safety arms just below my shoulders at the lowest point my dip. I am going very deep with my squats (exactly parallel, maybe 2-3 degrees lower) and they feel GREAT. Using a slightly shoulder width stance with toes about 15 degrees duck out. I noticed my knees have a tendancy to buckle inward under heavy weight, so I've been working on keeping that issue under control. My question is, when I am at the very bottom of my squat towards the last reps of my final set, I ALWAYS get stuck at the bottom and fail. It happens everytime, and it's not a huge deal because I take the proper safety precautions, but is this a healthy way to train? Should I up the weight until 8 reps is easy enough to do heavier at a guaranteed 6, or am I doing alright? (I usually get 4-6 reps during my final set, usually 4 sets total) I'm not sure if this is too vague or if my question is clear enough, but this is the only exercise that I consistantly fail on during the last set and I'm just wondering what advice you guys can give me.
    Last edited by Nosaj; 09-06-2005 at 12:25 AM.
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  3. #2
    Banned spencerjrus's Avatar
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    As long as there is no injury risk there is no problem. Squats are a demanding movement, failure is common.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    If I ever fail on squats, it's because I did not plan or prepare carefully enough. That's just me though. If you are being careful, it probably isn't going to hurt you to do so.

  5. #4
    Where's all the 45s ?!?! Wierz's Avatar
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    http://www.muscletalk.co.uk/article...vertraining.asp

    "...by training to failure each time you train you are going set your nerve cells into a constant state of inhibition leading you to tax the CNS far to much through the increased out put of electrical impulses. This will lead to rapid overtraining. That leads to time off and bodily and mental states lacking motivation, appetite, etc. It also means that it is not always muscular failure which is occurring; more CNS failure, which means that your muscles are not being worked anyway so stimuli for growth is not being achieved every time you train.
    Couple muscular and neuro failure together and what do you get? Poor form and therefore poor training. Poor form leads to injuries and injuries lead to more time off.
    So, in conclusion to all this, muscular failure, be it concentric, eccentric or isometric, is not necessary to provide a growth stimulus. What is necessary are good form, continuous training, the build up of fatigue products and good diet and resting patterns. Fibres need sufficient training for microtrauma to be incurred causing the release of regenerative hormones to be released in the cells which leaches into the surrounding area as well as intracellular calcium levels to rise to trigger both growth and destructive processes (destructive to remove such substrates as lactic acid) without over taxation of the nervous system.
    I hope this demonstrates that the CNS is a vital part of your training and that by training to failure time and time again you will offset the positive effects of it with the negative effects. Once again I will iterate that I do believe that training to failure is a useful tool for growth stimuli, only not the only tool. "

    --------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by Built... (I'm a quote pimp I know)

    I rarely train to complete failure on large compound movement because my form suffers to the point of it not being productive, or maybe even injuring myself. I have visions of training to failure doing a dealift and watching sections of my spine shoot out my back and smack against the mirror behind the squat platform. ouchzorz.
    Last edited by Wierz; 09-06-2005 at 07:16 AM.
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  6. #5
    The Body Never Lies Nosaj's Avatar
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    Wow, awesome answer. Thanks man.
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  7. #6
    Fury Divine RickTheDestroyer's Avatar
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    I've done this a couple times.
    I wouldn't do it regularly, but I think it can be a useful tool to help you make sure that you really are giving everything you've got, and also I think it can help you be less scared of big weight (or at least, big to you...).
    I think experiencing the worst-case-scenario teaches you that it's not as bad or scary as you expect, so you can load the bar and try heavier weights without fear- and if you get stuck at the bottom then it's no big deal.

    That was my experience with it anyway. I've been trying to bring my squat back up to where it was, and I still look at weight that I used to laugh at with fear, and I've been considering taking a set to failure just so I'll quit being a wuss with it and make sure that I'm giving my all.
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