The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Thread: Lactic Acid???

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Lactic Acid???

    I was always under the assumption that the lactic acid buildup a person get after a workout is what gives that person their soreness. I just read it isn't, but the article didn't say what it was. Does anyone know what it is? Is there a quick way to get rid of it?


    I guess my real question is, how the heck can I get rid of my soreness quickly?
    Last edited by Chester; 10-19-2005 at 02:30 PM.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member getfit's Avatar
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    try stretching
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  4. #3
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    It's called DOMS, and a little active recovery can be helpful. Avoid NSAIDS, because they interfere with protein synthesis.

  5. #4
    Panic Prone waynis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chester
    I was always under the assumption that the lactic acid buildup a person get after a workout is what gives that person their soreness. I just read it isn't, but the article didn't say what it was. Does anyone know what it is? Is there a quick way to get rid of it?


    I guess my real question is, how the heck can I get rid of my soreness quickly?
    As built said.. what your referring to is called DOMS (Delayed onset muscle soreness) Lactic acid build up happens during a workout like lifting where it burns and you tire out.

    Ways of reducing DOMS.. stretching.. proper warmup. Diet. Plenty of calories and protein to heal those muscles. Some products like microlactin, creatine may help DOMS but proper diet is key along with the stretching/warmup. I noticed since I started proper stretching and warmup it helped a ton in reducing DOMS. More then Diet alone.
    Last edited by waynis; 10-22-2005 at 01:02 PM.
    Never Giving In.

  6. #5
    HS Football D Breyer's Avatar
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    i find that getting on the eliptical for 5-15 minuites helps a ton... actually i was just researching this topic for a school project and found:

    * You may find it advantageous to follow up your resistance training session with 5-15 minutes of low- to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, preferably a full-body mode (i.e. Elliptical trainer or jogging). The purpose of this aerobic session is to gorge those muscles that were just trained with blood. This massive blood flow will assist recovery by: 1) removing waste products from the muscles, 2) transporting nutrients and oxygen to the muscles, and 3) shuttling metabolic by-products (i.e. lactic acid) from the muscle to the liver for recycling (i.e. gluconeogenesis). Two added benefits: more energy expenditure and glycogen utilization, which creates a greater glucose economy, allows for more carbohydrate to be eaten in the recovery period, and enhances glucose uptake and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity- critical factors for improvement in body composition. Be forewarned, though, that even at low and moderate intensities, if the aerobic components cause the exercise sessions to carry on too long (i.e. greater than 75 minutes), they may very well do more harm than good over an extended period of time. As such, it's important to keep you resistance training sessions to 60 minutes or less. Several factors, however, are contraindications (in most cases) to performing post-training aerobic activity; most notable among these factors are excellent pre-existing insulin sensitivity and high volume strength-training programs.

    source: http://ruggedmag.com/index.php?type=Article&i=2&a=6
    6'1 - 195
    Crossfit Total: Press: 135 - Squat: 315 - Deadlift: 365
    Competition Lifts: Clean: 205 - Bench: 205

  7. #6
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Interesting ... I'll go read that link in a sec, thanks!

    I usually do at least 5 minutes of fast incline walking after heavy calf work, and it seems to work WONDERS for preventing DOMS there.

  8. #7
    HS Football D Breyer's Avatar
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    lol i actually got that link from the diet in your sig haha
    6'1 - 195
    Crossfit Total: Press: 135 - Squat: 315 - Deadlift: 365
    Competition Lifts: Clean: 205 - Bench: 205

  9. #8
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Ah - I didn't even see that it was from rugged before I posted!

    I think that article was why I started doing the fast incline walking after calf work!

    Hehehe...

  10. #9
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    It's called DOMS, and a little active recovery can be helpful. Avoid NSAIDS, because they interfere with protein synthesis.

    Enough to compromise muscle growth?
    Maki Fit Blog

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    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  11. #10
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    As I understand it, yes.

    I read it in a peer-reviewed journal article somewhere (I'll dig up the link if you like), and then my chiropractor mentioned it when I was getting ART earlier this year.

    The way he explained it - say you injure your ankle, so you take NSAIDs for the pain. Because the drug interferes with protein synthesis, you'll continue to re-injure this area because it won't heal properly while you continue to take the drug.

  12. #11
    HS Football D Breyer's Avatar
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    very interesting... thank you for that, built.
    6'1 - 195
    Crossfit Total: Press: 135 - Squat: 315 - Deadlift: 365
    Competition Lifts: Clean: 205 - Bench: 205

  13. #12
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    I'd be interested in reading the link.

    Thanks.
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  14. #13
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    PowerManDL said this on another forum I belong to:

    Anything that inhibits the inflammatory process *may* interfere with recovery....NSAIDs have been shown to interfere with cytokines and some of the other macrophage and neutrophil-mediated pathways during muscle recovery, which can inhibit both satellite cell activation and protein synthesis. Not good for hypertrophy, no, but I have no idea of what dosages this would take, nor how significantly it would affect things.

    I'd imagine this would fall under "ok a few times but not in the long run".
    A few sources:

    http://ajpcell.physiology.org/cgi/co...t/00088.2004v1

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12580656

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12755383

    Basic NSAIDs

  15. #14
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    Quoted from the first link.

    PG synthesis is catalyzed by different isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX), which are inhibited by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    I will assume that this is the most meaningful piece of info you wanted me to read in the link. Do you know what kind of dose it would take to inhibit PG synthesis? The one study I've seen shows a dose of 1200mg of ibuprofen. That's quite a bit.

    I don't know what you wanted me to see in the second link.

    And the third link you posted uses rats as their test subjects.
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  16. #15
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    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Mar;282(3):E551-6. Related Articles, Links


    Effect of ibuprofen and acetaminophen on postexercise muscle protein synthesis.

    Trappe TA, White F, Lambert CP, Cesar D, Hellerstein M, Evans WJ.

    Donald W. Reynolds Center on Aging, Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and the Central Arkansas Veterans HealthCare System, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205, USA. trappetodda@uams.edu

    We examined the effect of two commonly consumed over-the-counter analgesics, ibuprofen and acetaminophen, on muscle protein synthesis and soreness after high-intensity eccentric resistance exercise. Twenty-four males (25 +/- 3 yr, 180 +/- 6 cm, 81 +/- 6 kg, and 17 +/- 8% body fat) were assigned to one of three groups that received either the maximal over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (IBU; 1,200 mg/day), acetaminophen (ACET; 4,000 mg/day), or a placebo (PLA) after 10-14 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions at 120% of concentric one-repetition maximum with the knee extensors. Postexercise (24 h) skeletal muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was increased 76 +/- 19% (P < 0.05) in PLA (0.058 +/- 0.012%/h) and was unchanged (P > 0.05) in IBU (35 +/- 21%; 0.021 +/- 0.014%/h) and ACET (22 +/- 23%; 0.010 +/- 0.019%/h). Neither drug had any influence on whole body protein breakdown, as measured by rate of phenylalanine appearance, on serum creatine kinase, or on rating of perceived muscle soreness compared with PLA. These results suggest that over-the-counter doses of both ibuprofen and acetaminophen suppress the protein synthesis response in skeletal muscle after eccentric resistance exercise. Thus these two analgesics may work through a common mechanism to influence protein metabolism in skeletal muscle.
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