The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Thoughts on this...

    Metabolic Circuit for Advanced Athletes

    We’ve seen this program make better increases in muscle mass and strength than traditional lifting programs. The problem is that it’s extremely demanding. It’s not for beginners, and even advanced athletes won’t want to maintain this intensity for more than four to six weeks. The program increases metabolism, which burns more calories at rest. As the athletes build muscle, they lose fat. Use this metabolic circuit only during the base phase in the postseason or off-season. The metabolic circuit replaces the strength day on Tuesday and Friday, but the explosive day exercises continue to be on Monday and Thursday. The exercise order for the metabolic circuit is not critical except for the first station. The squat needs to be done first in this circuit or the program won’t produce the desired results. The other eight exercises can be done in any order. Try to have on exercise for each large muscle in the body. The program should start with multiple-joint exercises and finish with single-joint exercises. Exercises using larger muscle groups release more testosterone. Some coaches alternate leg, chest, and back exercises to allow for recovery of muscle groups.

    Husker Power Metabolic Circuit Stations

    1. Squat – works thighs, hamstrings, hips, lower back
    2. Lying leg curl – works hamstrings
    3. Leg extension – works quads
    4. Bench press – works chest, shoulders, triceps
    5. Lat pull-down – works lats, biceps and forearms
    6. Shoulder press – works shoulders, triceps
    7. Low lat pull-down – works lats, biceps and forearms
    8. Tricep extensions – works triceps
    9. Bicep Curls – works biceps

    Load and Time. Use a weight that allows for a set of 10 repetitions. Allow 80 seconds total for the work and the rest at each station. Each rep takes about 2 seconds. The squat takes longer, but for most of the exercises most of the 80 seconds is used for recovery. More growth hormone is released when the number of repetitions is 10 as opposed to 5 or fewer, and more is released when the rest period is at 1 minute rather than 3 or 4 minutes. The speed of each movement is not explosive but done under control to allow good form. Note all sets are done at each station before rotating to the next station. This is different from the push-pull circuit.
    Levels of Difficulty. Beginner – 1 set of 10 reps done 2 or 3 days per week. Be sure to have a physician’s clearance, and present the release form to the supervisor before attempting this program. Allow 80 seconds to complete each station.
    Intermediate – The program should be progressive in nature and advance to two sets at each station before moving to the next station. The circuit is done twice a week on strength days.
    Advanced – Three sets at each station with higher loads to increase strength and bone density. Multiple sets work best for development of strength and local muscular endurance. The gains made will be at a faster rate than gains achieved through single- or double-set programs. Total time is 36 minutes.
    The metabolic circuit should not be used year round. The advanced level (three sets) is very advanced and should only be used during the base phase to develop lean muscle. The advanced level should not be done by young athletes, who don’t have enough strength.

    The following chart shows the 14 pounds of muscle developed by Kyle Vanden Bosch as he prepared for his senior year in college. Kyle is a professional football player now, and this chart shows his progress doing the advanced level Husker Power metabolic circuit. Kyle was voted Lifter of the Year as a junior and was looking for a program that would bring additional results. Nationally recognized scientist Dr. Bill Kraemer visited Nebraska many years ago when he was a strength coach at Carrol College in Iowa. I put him through a circuit workout that was so hard it about killed him. We called it the “Death Circuit” then but changed the name to the “Survivor Circuit” to give it a more positive spin, but it was still so hard that we quit using it. However, 15 years after first trying the workout, Dr. Kraemer kept tweaking it. When he felt he had something to share, he called and explained how the program built up too much lactic acid in the muscle and was too painful for athletes to handle. The metabolic circuit corrects that and also sends a growth hormone throughout the body to produce strength and size gains.
    We needed someone tough to handle the circuit, so we asked our strongest athlete, Kevin Coleman, to give it a try. He had just won the national championship in the shot-put as a junior and was looking for a program to take him to another level. Within a matter of weeks, Kevin made gains he hadn’t imagined possible, so we asked him to address the football team. He told the Nebraska players they weren’t tough enough to handle this program. We challenged 30 players to sign up to do the metabolic circuit, but we warned then it was all or nothing. Once they committed to the six-week program, they could not back out. We also required them to be upper classmen. The program increases strength rapidly, but we’ve learned over time not to put some athletes on the circuit because it makes them gain weight so quickly. For example, Lawrence Phillips was a powerful 205-pound I-Back who did the program for four weeks before we pulled him off it at 226 pounds.

    Vanden Bosch Progress Chart
    Weight Muscle 10 yard dash 40 yard dash Agility run Vertical
    262 229 1.67 4.85 4.09 32
    267 243 1.7 4.84 3.97 32.5
    5 14 0.03 -0.01 -0.12 0.5

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  3. #2
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    More growth hormone is released when the number of repetitions is 10 as opposed to 5 or fewer, and more is released when the rest period is at 1 minute rather than 3 or 4 minutes.
    You get a boatload of GH released from starving, too.

    Why would this matter here?

  4. #3
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    Hmmm 27 sets for advanced in 36 minutes with 80 sec rest in between. Something doesnt sound right.........
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    The concept is okay, but most of the exercises are piss poor.
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  6. #5
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBC13
    Hmmm 27 sets for advanced in 36 minutes with 80 sec rest in between. Something doesnt sound right.........
    Each set plus rest period is 80 secs.

    1 set + rest = 80 sec = 1.33333 mins.

    1.33333 mins x 27 = 35.99991 mins

    I guess it is even more intense than 36 mins by 9 millionth of a second! I hope your stopwatch is very good!
    There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Or you can do real math ...

    80 seconds * 27 sets = 2160 seconds / 60 seconds per minute = 36 minutes.
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  8. #7
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony
    Or you can do real math ...

    80 seconds * 27 sets = 2160 seconds / 60 seconds per minute = 36 minutes.
    I did it that way, but I got 108 on my calculator. Must've hit something wrong.
    There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.
    Are you eating while you are reading this? You should be... --hrdgain81
    Remember, kids, if you type well the Grammar Fairy will leave a quarter under your pillow. The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

    Well, the Blog's (finally) back (again!): Love and Hope and Sex and Dreams Feel free to stop by and comment.
    Here is my newly-created World of Warcraft Blog: BG's WoW Blog. Once again, feel free to stop by and comment.

  9. #8
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    IMO - you lift to get big and strong - if you want to burn fat, do some cardio.

  10. #9
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pats Fan
    IMO - you lift to get big and strong - if you want to burn fat, do some cardio.
    You think you'll lean out more from cardio than from lifting?

  11. #10
    Not Done Yet ShockBoxer's Avatar
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    Heh. I've lost 18 lbs and I hit the cardio machines maybe once a month...
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  12. #11
    still dislikes Art Atwood Hatred's Avatar
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    Too much damn math.
    Out of the night that covers me,Black as the Pit from pole to pole,I thank whatever gods may be for my unconquerable soul. In The fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears looms but the horror of the shade And yet the menace of the years finds, and shall find, me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate how charged with punishments the scroll,I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    You think you'll lean out more from cardio than from lifting?
    Nope, I don't do cardio and I stay fairly lean - 10% bf, give or take - which is where I want to be. I understand the impact lifting/muscle microtrauma/protein synthesis, etc. has on increasing RMR - thereby helping to enhance fat loss. My point is that, IMO, lifting weights in the manner outlined by this excerpt/article, whatever, turns lifting into a cardio event.

    IMO - lift to get more muscles, stronger muscles, or both - that is the point. The fact that lifting weights helps to increase metabolism during protein synthesis (36 hrs give or take post-workout), is a great added benefit. Of course, more muscles also means a higher metabolism. But to lift in this fashion, to increase heart rate in a manner that simulates cardio is not the point of lifting.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    You get a boatload of GH released from starving, too.

    Why would this matter here?
    Chad Waterbury has stated that less rest b/w sets (60 sec vs. 120-180 sec) is superior for packing on LBM - and he suggested it had to do w/ hormones. Unfortunately, it was the tip of the day, so he didn't expand upon the point.

  15. #14
    Just watch me ... Built's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pats Fan
    Nope, I don't do cardio and I stay fairly lean - 10% bf, give or take - which is where I want to be. I understand the impact lifting/muscle microtrauma/protein synthesis, etc. has on increasing RMR - thereby helping to enhance fat loss. My point is that, IMO, lifting weights in the manner outlined by this excerpt/article, whatever, turns lifting into a cardio event.
    I agree - my thoughts exactly.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pats Fan
    IMO - lift to get more muscles, stronger muscles, or both - that is the point. The fact that lifting weights helps to increase metabolism during protein synthesis (36 hrs give or take post-workout), is a great added benefit. Of course, more muscles also means a higher metabolism. But to lift in this fashion, to increase heart rate in a manner that simulates cardio is not the point of lifting.
    I also agree with this part.

    What I had an issue with was the implication that cardio was somehow more helpful than lifting for leaning out. I now understand what you meant - thanks for the clarification.

  16. #15
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    I hate circuit training

  17. #16
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    Power circuit training is great, but those exercises are horrible for anybody, let alone an athlete.

    The back is barely worked in the prescribed routine. I also think that a total body routine with all of those heavy loads is a recipe for overtraining, unless you did it maybe twice per week. Even then, the routine would get extremely boring and draining, and lead to injury.

  18. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    I agree - my thoughts exactly.




    I also agree with this part.

    What I had an issue with was the implication that cardio was somehow more helpful than lifting for leaning out. I now understand what you meant - thanks for the clarification.
    Yes, I should have clarified my thoughts/points better - sorry about that.

  19. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadlifter
    Power circuit training is great, but those exercises are horrible for anybody, let alone an athlete.

    The back is barely worked in the prescribed routine. I also think that a total body routine with all of those heavy loads is a recipe for overtraining, unless you did it maybe twice per week. Even then, the routine would get extremely boring and draining, and lead to injury.
    Not sure if this is what you are saying - but I have trained full body, 3xper week for a few yrs, using only heavy, compound lifts. If you keep volume/workout and per week in check, and eat enough, you can certainly avoid overtraining - however, I tend to stick to 3-4 compound movements per workout, and limit each major muscle group to 24-30 reps per workout - 60-80 reps per week, tops, depending upon intensity.

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