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Thread: Shoulder Health

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Shoulder Health

    Recently, despite knowing better, I've had reoccuring shoulder issues that have come from neglecting shoulder work... This is not complete, but I thought some of you might find it helpful.

    There are a number of on-line tutorials that go over the muscles of the shoulder, their origins and insertions, and their functions. Here is one that is easy to read and use:
    http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap/muscu...menu/menu.html

    Perhaps more important than understanding the muscles of the shoulder is understanding the movements of the shoulder joint and girdle and then setting out to strengthen them.

    The movements that will be trained by the exercise pictures that follow will include:

    arm abduction - raising the arm up and away from the body as in a lateral raise.

    arm adduction - pulling the arm down to the body as in the eccentric phase of a lateral raise.

    arm horizontal abduction - pulling the arms out away from the body as in a bent-over lateral raise.

    arm horizontal adduction - pulling the arms in front of the body as in dumbell flyes.

    arm flexion - raising the arms in front of the body as in a front raise.

    arm extension - pulling the arms down to the sides of the body as in a straight arm pull down.

    arm hyperextension - pulling the arms back behind the body as in the final portion of a swimming stroke before the overwater recovery.

    arm inward rotation - rotation of the arm in towards the body as in an internal rotation exercise.

    arm outward rotation - rotation of the arm away from the body as in external rotation exercise.

    scapula adduction - scapula pulling together towards the center of the body as in a prone shrug.

    scapula abduction - scapula pulling apart as in a lat spread.

    scapula outward rotation - scapula rotating out and upwards as in an overhead shrug.

    scapula inward rotation - scapula rotating down and inward as when doing a pulldown.

    scapula elevation - scapula rising upward as in a traditional shrug.

    scapula depression - scapula lowering as in a reverse shrug.

    Pullovers


    Bent Over Front Raise


    "Pull-Throughs"


    Bent Over Laterals


    Chest Supported Shrug


    Pulldown Shrug


    Overhead Shrug


    External Rotator #1


    External Rotator #2


    Internal Rotator


    pics still to come (bench press shrugs, dip shrugs, rows, snatch)
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Limit of 20 images/post.

    Flyes
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Good post. You may want to include some stretches, like dislocates, etc.

    I like cable machines for these movements, to keep tension throughout the ROM.

    The journal / I live here.

    If I were to start from scratch as a young 13 year old again, I would do every press, squat, and perhaps deadlifts, for my entire career with chains. -- Dan John

  4. #4
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Yeah, I wanted to include some stretches (like shoulder dislocates, lat and scapula stretches, etc) and pics of the shoulder movements I was describing, but I can only ask my wife to take so many pictures... We'll probably get it done this weekend.

    edit: Yes, also you could use elastic tubing/stretch cords for a lot of these exercises. Cables are a great - especially for movements where you can handle more weight at the start of the movement.
    Last edited by Sensei; 03-13-2006 at 09:19 PM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
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    Bands as well, like you said, deserve a lot of consideration. Normally not a huge fan of these for any sort of sport-specific training (unless said training involves a given lift), but the resistance curve nicely matches the power curve for quite a few of these small shoulder muscles.
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belial
    Bands as well, like you said, deserve a lot of consideration. Normally not a huge fan of these for any sort of sport-specific training (unless said training involves a given lift), but the resistance curve nicely matches the power curve for quite a few of these small shoulder muscles.
    Actually, one thing I've always liked about bands, tubing, chains, etc. is that they allow you to accelerate throughout the movement relatively safely. Something you can't do w. regular plain-old weight.

    Using bands/tubing can also be a disadvantage if you are trying to stress the first part of the ROM. You will to reposition yourself or the anchor point frequently to get the desired tension.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    C.S.C.S. ddegroff's Avatar
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    nice post this will answer so many questions. also nice web site, explains all the muscles and such!
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