The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Flat Legged Sit-ups

    I was told today that flat legged sit-ups are bad for your hips, true?
    Flat legged sit-ups- you lay flat on your back, arms to sides, legs together and straight. One rep consists of you coming up and getting your chin as close to your thighs as possible, then back down.
    Is this bad for your hips or any other part of your body?

    Also, this summer I am going to be camping/moving. I'm not sure how long I'll be doing that, depends on how long it takes to find a place to live. I'm going to obviously have to stop lifting, but I want am going to keep doing calisthenics, running, and I am going to bring some dumb bells so I can do some exercises with weights.
    My question, since I won't be lifting, would it be wise to do pull-ups, push-ups, sit-ups, dips, squat thrusts, toe raises, and the exercises I'll do with the dumb bells everyday? Those exercises with dumb bells will be shoulder complex, forearms, tricepes, and military press.
    Or should I have the same attitude as lifting, don't lift the same muscle everyday, no more than every other day? I will do the same thing I've been doing for running, long distance MWF, and sprints Tues/Thurs/Sat.
    Thanks for any and all help.
    Last edited by Devilpup; 01-09-2006 at 09:55 PM.
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  3. #2
    Senior Member deeder's Avatar
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    Can't say I know much about the flat legged situps... My guess is that they may be harder on the hips because the hip flexors (?) are stretched out more and they act together with your abs. They could also be better for strengthening your hips... Don't really know...

    As far as the camping workouts... I've spent several summers camping and canoeing... I've never really bothered lifting while I was gone.. Do lots of hiking, canoe a ton and carry a nice heavy backpack with everything you own in it... You'll drop some BF and if you eat right put on some muscle!
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  4. #3
    Mint
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    Flat leg sit-ups are better for your hips as the raising of the torso is conducted by the hip flexors. It does put more stress on your spine however.
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  5. #4
    Banned ROMANMAN's Avatar
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    How do you plan on weighing those with youre arms on the floor?

  6. #5
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
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    There's really no point in doing any kind of situps. And its not the hip flexors you need to worry about, its your spine and the muscles that support it. They are put in unnecissary danger by situps, IMO.

    You can train those muscles more effectively with pulldown abs, weighted crunches, and weighted leg raises.
    Squat...Eat...Sleep...Grow...Repeat

  7. #6
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xMeat_Headx
    There's really no point in doing any kind of situps. And its not the hip flexors you need to worry about, its your spine and the muscles that support it. They are put in unnecissary danger by situps, IMO.

    You can train those muscles more effectively with pulldown abs, weighted crunches, and weighted leg raises.
    I feel like I'm cyber-stalking you... Why do you say there's no point in doing sit-ups?...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  8. #7
    Banned ROMANMAN's Avatar
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    I think he just means there are alote of better excersises out there. BTW why do you feel youre cyber stalkinh him?

  9. #8
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    If they don't hurt your hips, do them. They're good for working your abs and hips. I don't do them often, but I like to mix them in every now and then.

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  10. #9
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROMANMAN
    I think he just means there are alote of better excersises out there. BTW why do you feel youre cyber stalkinh him?
    We seem to agree on nothing lately...

    IMHO, sit-ups w. weight are a GREAT exercise. Yes, they engage the hip flexors and are primarily a isometric contraction for your abs, but the same could be said for most athletic applications.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  11. #10
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    We seem to agree on nothing lately...

    IMHO, sit-ups w. weight are a GREAT exercise. Yes, they engage the hip flexors and are primarily a isometric contraction for your abs, but the same could be said for most athletic applications.
    They are a great exercise, they just have unnecissary risks. The same muscle groups can be more effectively and more safely trained with other exercises.
    Squat...Eat...Sleep...Grow...Repeat

  12. #11
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
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    Sit-ups are fine if they are performed using the first 30 degrees of flexion and focusing on the concentric and eccentric portions by slowing the movement down.
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    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
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