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Thread: Possible form problems?

  1. #1
    Shoulda been a meso... puny_ectomorph's Avatar
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    Possible form problems?

    I'm still working on my power-style squat form (using a box). The other day I decided to load up to heavy (for me) weight and give it a shot.

    I handled 210 pounds...the poundage I was previously stuck at for 5 reps in the olympic style...without a problem and loaded to 225. (Two plates a side...I'm finally getting somewhere!) I knocked out five reps nice and smoothly.

    This morning I woke up and my lower back, while not in direct pain, is sore and stiff as a board; my hams and glutes, on the other hand, don't feel worked at all. I'm aware that soreness does not necessarily mean a muscle has been worked; however, as I had not been using my hams and glutes much in my olympic-style squats, I'd figure they'd feel something.

    Since the soreness is primarily lower back, is it possible I'm having problems with my squat form? Or is this simply adaptation?

    Thanks,
    -puny-
    Stats:
    height 5'10
    weight 187

    Currently dl'ing 255 for 3 reps x 8 sets
    Goals:
    350 lb deadlift by Feb. 2007

    "Squats and milk and nevermind if the principle is twenty years old." -Randall J. Strossen

    "They don't know much about nutritional science, but they know enough to stick to the three basic food groups: Tex-Mex, Cajun and ranch." -Paul Kelso

  2. #2
    Senior Member KevinStarke's Avatar
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    Hmm... using the squat form the guys at my gym have taught me after box squats (which I did yesterday) I can definitelly feel it in my glutes and hams but my back feels fine aside from some slight tightness from the reverse hypers. It could be a problem with the way your sitting down on the box. Are you sitting real far back when you hit the box, could be leaning to foward.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Soreness means the muscle was worked (otherwise why would it be sore?), but it does NOT mean you made progress. More weight on the bar means you made progress.

    Anyway, if it's a dull tight soreness, it's not much to worry about. It could be your form, it could be over worked from a previous workout, etc. Record your sets and review yourself, or have someone watch you.
    Facebook - BW166 SQ585 BP405 DL660 CL310

  4. #4
    Senior Member KevinStarke's Avatar
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    Chest out, look at the sky!
    Last edited by KevinStarke; 01-31-2006 at 08:27 AM.

  5. #5
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Transitioning from oly. to power style squatting will require more lower back involvement! No surprises there, so just keep working and conditioning your erectors.

    The journal / I live here.

    If I were to start from scratch as a young 13 year old again, I would do every press, squat, and perhaps deadlifts, for my entire career with chains. -- Dan John

  6. #6
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Yes. Widening your stance and sitting back (with or without the box) will mean more forward lean and more lower back.

    You might have form issues or your lower back just needs time and training. Make sure that you aren't leaning forward excessively or losing core tightness on the box.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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