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Thread: external vs internal rotations

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    Senior Member JamesBOMB's Avatar
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    external vs internal rotations

    External rotations I did 5x15reps, but on the internal rotations I can do 20x15reps. Should these be equal? I feel my external rotations need alot of work, because I can really feel the weakness when I do them. Im sure this is why my shoudler gets injured a few times a year. I did these on cable
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    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Internal rotations are typically much stronger. Proportionate eternal and internal rotator strength doesn't necessarily mean equal weights on things like cable or DB rotations, but in most cases, external rotator work should be emphasized for extra work, like specific RC work such as external rotations and cuban presses, and make sure your pulling stength is proportinate to pushing.

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    Senior Member JamesBOMB's Avatar
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    Doc said for me to to rotations to help "strengthen" my shoulder. I personally find it does help. I do cuban rotations as well with dumbells

    Pulling vs pushing as in shoulder press vs lat pulldown?
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    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesBOMB
    External rotations I did 5x15reps, but on the internal rotations I can do 20x15reps. Should these be equal? I feel my external rotations need alot of work, because I can really feel the weakness when I do them. Im sure this is why my shoudler gets injured a few times a year. I did these on cable
    Like Mix said, most people are A LOT stronger w. internal rotation exercises. Most people could stand some external rotator work. However, external rotation exercises are probably not all you need if you want to "injury-proof" your rotator cuff. If you want to cover most of your bases, in addition to standard external/internal rotation work, you should do work for all the muscles of the rotator cuff

    SITS (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis) - someone with a rotator cuff injury sits out. (taken from Wilkipedia)

    supraspinatus-arm abduction (hurt usually in activities that raise the arm above the head)
    infraspinatus-arm outward rotation, arm adduction and abduction, horizontal adduction
    teres minor-extends the arm and rotates the arm outward, arm adduction, arm hyperextension
    subscapularis-rotates arm inward when arm in held by the side of the body, arm extension and hyperextension, and arm adduction

    To cover most of these movements, try to do: a variety of raises front raises and side raises to above shoulder level, bent-over laterals, bent-over front raises, rows, shrugs of all kinds (bent-over, chest supported, traditional, overhead, etc.), and "pull-throughs" (a bent-over raise pulling the arm straight down and past the hips - can be done on a pull down machine or using surgical tubing as well).

    If I have more time at some point, I'll try to write something more coherent with pics...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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    Senior Member JamesBOMB's Avatar
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    Iv always done front, side, rear delt raises, these arent newbie shoulders. I beleive the doc said it was the teres minor. The pull throughs sound weird though, pics would help if you ever get that chance for more time.
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    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    It basically looks like a (the horrors!) tricep kickback. Start out as you would for a dumbell row, keep your arm straight and raise it backwards.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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    Senior Member JamesBOMB's Avatar
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    ah, i got it now, sounds interesting, thanks
    6' 2" 22years old
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    WannabeStronger Scooter's Avatar
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    Sensei,

    It would be great if you could type something up on this subject. I've been having issues with my shoulder and have been looking for a more insight on the muscles surrounding the rotator cuff.
    I went to Rhodestown and all I got was this high cholesterol

  10. #10
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I'll see what I can do. Maybe this weekend.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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