The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercury
    I think people are forgetting that our ancestors were hunters and gathers before farming. They did take in simple carbs from the fruits and berries they would eat between hunts. This also provided the fiber that we need to keep things moving along. It wasnít until after farming, that carbs became a major part of our diet. We donít naturally eat wheat and other grains; we have to process them to a point were they become edible.
    I'm not sure what your point is here but I was watching Ray Mears Bushcraft series and he was visiting africa. I was amazed at the carbs that they were able to find all around. Roots, berries and various other sources. It seemed that they could eat it each day. The men did the hunting and the women did the gathering. It's really was amazing. I had to download both seasons.

  2. #77
    Senior Member Manveet's Avatar
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    From Lyle's new article: How Many Carbohydrates Do You Need?

    As I discussed in great detail previously, there is no actual physiological requirement for dietary carbohydrate. Most tissues can use fatty acids, the few that utilize glucose exclusively just reuse the same amounts over and over, and the brain switches to using ketones when glucose isn't available with the body making what little is required from other sources. From the standpoint of survival, the minimum amount of carbohydrates that are required in a diet is zero grams.

    Of course, when carbohydrates are restricted completely, the body has to find something to make glucose out of. That something is lactate and pyruvate (produced from glucose metabolism), glycerol (from fat metabolism) and amino acids. It's the amino acid use that can be problematic since they have to come from somewhere. Under conditions of total starvation, that somewhere is generally muscle tissue; the body will readily break down protein to scavenge the amino acids it needs to produce glucose. In doing so, the muscle released alanine and glutamine (produced in the muscle from the breakdown of leucine and the branch chained amino acids, so you know) which can be converted to glucose in the liver.

    Protein losses during total starvation are extremely high to start, gradually decreasing as the brain switches over to using ketones for fuel. Even so, in complete starvation there is always some loss of body protein. Over long periods of time, this goes from harmful (because function is compromised from muscle loss) to downright fatal.

    From a body recomposition point of view, it should be obvious that losing muscle protein this way is bad. Researchers found years ago that providing adequate dietary protein helped to decrease if not outright eliminate the utilization of body protein for gluconeogenesis (a big word meaning the production of new glucose). Diets providing nothing but small amounts of protein (to the tune of 1.5 g/kg lean body mass or so) helped to almost eliminate the nitrogen losses inherent to starvation.
    Link to full article:
    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/Art...manycarbs.html
    "It is often said, mainly by the "no-contests", that although there is no positive evidence for the existence of God, nor is there evidence against his existence. So it is best to keep an open mind and be agnostic. At first sight that seems an unassailable position, at least in the weak sense of Pascal's wager. But on second thought it seems a cop-out, because the same could be said of Father Christmas and tooth fairies. There may be fairies at the bottom of the garden. There is no evidence for it, but you can't prove that there aren't any, so shouldn't we be agnostic with respect to fairies?"

    Richard Dawkins


    "Out of all of the sects in the world, we notice an uncanny coincidence: the overwhelming majority just happen to choose the one that their parents belong to. Not the sect that has the best evidence in its favour, the best miracles, the best moral code, the best cathedral, the best stained glass, the best music: when it comes to choosing from the smorgasbord of available religions, their potential virtues seem to count for nothing, compared to the matter of heredity. This is an unmistakable fact; nobody could seriously deny it. Yet people with full knowledge of the arbitrary nature of this heredity, somehow manage to go on believing in their religion, often with such fanaticism that they are prepared to murder people who follow a different one."


    Richard Dawkins


    "Bah. You know I hate poor people."

    Paul Stagg

  3. #78
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    Ok seriosly why is it that when I go to...

    http://www.forums.lylemcdonald.com/forums/

    ...using IE or Firefox the only forum I see is "Announcements", this is crazy.

  4. #79
    Senior Member Manveet's Avatar
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    you're not logged in.
    "It is often said, mainly by the "no-contests", that although there is no positive evidence for the existence of God, nor is there evidence against his existence. So it is best to keep an open mind and be agnostic. At first sight that seems an unassailable position, at least in the weak sense of Pascal's wager. But on second thought it seems a cop-out, because the same could be said of Father Christmas and tooth fairies. There may be fairies at the bottom of the garden. There is no evidence for it, but you can't prove that there aren't any, so shouldn't we be agnostic with respect to fairies?"

    Richard Dawkins


    "Out of all of the sects in the world, we notice an uncanny coincidence: the overwhelming majority just happen to choose the one that their parents belong to. Not the sect that has the best evidence in its favour, the best miracles, the best moral code, the best cathedral, the best stained glass, the best music: when it comes to choosing from the smorgasbord of available religions, their potential virtues seem to count for nothing, compared to the matter of heredity. This is an unmistakable fact; nobody could seriously deny it. Yet people with full knowledge of the arbitrary nature of this heredity, somehow manage to go on believing in their religion, often with such fanaticism that they are prepared to murder people who follow a different one."


    Richard Dawkins


    "Bah. You know I hate poor people."

    Paul Stagg

  5. #80
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    Thank you.

  6. #81
    Senior Member seK's Avatar
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    I don't share the same world view, therefore, I don't come to the same conclusion on you as this. Since I believe we were created, and that food as it occours naturally today is how we are supposed to eat. Therefore, since carbs exist in plants and nature, I consider them essential part of our diet. BTW, before you attack my world view (not saying you will, but many will) you can't prove evolution, or the stages of it, since none of us were there for that! Not going to get involved in religion though. Just giving you my perspective on how I feel about carbs.
    I am by no means attacking, but evolution itself is and has been proven, this common misconception is due to the average persons misunderstanding of the word "theory" and how it applies to science. So just for future reference

    Theory of Evolution = proven and you can see it happen
    Origin of Man= not so easily defined.

    But thatís pretty off topic.

    My opinion is that cultural changes are the driving force behind out dietís.

  7. #82
    Wrecker of Homes d'Anconia's Avatar
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    Yeah I was thinking about the idea that evolution or natural selection doesn't take place during the course of a lifetime and now that I think of it, that isn't really true.
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  8. #83
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    I actually just did my final presentation for my nutrition class on a diet based on what our evolutionary ancestors ate. There is a lot of scientific research to support this way of eating, the most convincing of which is that the most common deadly diseases to plague modern Western society (i.e. cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, hypertension), are rare or non-existent in societies that follow a hunter-gatherer way of life. It is also believed that the life expectancy took a dive after the introduction of plants and animals about 10,000 years ago, that is it was higher in the previous hunter-gather lifestyle (this is attributed to both the change in diet from one based on animal source foods and micronutrient-rich vegetables and fruits to less nutritious cereal grains and dairy, and the effects this altered lifestyle had, for example the rapid spread of disease in high population densities). If anybody is interested in viewing the sources I've cited, I can post them.

    It's interesting because I've also been following a thread on another site (one specifically for the Paleolithic-based diet), in which a 71-year old guy has claimed he has been living on a diet with absolutely no plant matter (grains, fruits, or even vegetables), and only on meat and some additional fats such as cream and butter for 47 years, and leads a healthy, active lifestyle:

    http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=287013
    Last edited by threatmix; 03-20-2006 at 07:38 PM.

  9. #84
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    Just a quick note about that link I posted: some of the people posting there sound like they are making unsupported claims and have no idea what they're talking about and quite possibly may not, but it's an interesting topic and a related issue.

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