The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Alternating bulking and cutting rapidly?

    Hey, first post here.

    So the general consensus is, the best way to put on muscle is to bulk, because without excess calories, gaining muscle is near impossible (or at least very difficult/unlikely), and the best way to lose fat is to cut, because you need a calorie deficit to burn fat. During bulking, the goal is to maximize muscle gains while minimizing fat, and during cutting, the goal is to maximize fat burn while minimizing muscle loss. That all makes sense to me.

    Usually when people do bulking and cutting cycles, they do them for months at a time. However, this creates an obvious problem: at the peak of a bulk, people usually have quite a bit of excess fat, while at the peak of a cut, people are usually at their weakest.

    As an answer to this problem, is it possible to frequently alternate between bulking and cutting? As in, every week, for example? One week, you could eat a lot of excess calories, and minimize cardio, while the next week, you would create a calorie deficit and increase the cardio. The whole time, the diet would be clean and very high in protein, and the weightlifting would be consistent and intense. It seems like this would also take advantage of a person's metabolism. When someone cuts, their metabolism eventually slows down after the body becomes used to surviving on less food. Likewise, after bulking, metabolism eventually speeds up to handle the extra food. By alternating every week, right when a person's metabolism is speeding up from the bulk, you would start cutting, and you could use this increased metabolism to help out in the cutting process. Same in reverse for bulking. The idea would be, at the end of two weeks, there would be slight increases in muscle mass and decreases in fat (slight gains, but it would add up over time).

    Does this make any sense? Are there any reasons this wouldn't work, and why do people always bulk and cut for long periods of time? Has anybody tried this? Looking forward to some responses.
    Last edited by somedude; 04-16-2006 at 05:08 PM.

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  3. #2
    Is cutting down to 9% Jordanbcool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by somedude
    Hey, first post here.

    So the general consensus is, the best way to put on muscle is to bulk, because without excess calories, gaining muscle is near impossible (or at least very difficult/unlikely), and the best way to lose fat is to cut, because you need a calorie deficit to burn fat. During bulking, the goal is to maximize muscle gains while minimizing fat, and during cutting, the goal is to maximize fat burn while minimizing muscle loss. That all makes sense to me.

    Usually when people do bulking and cutting cycles, they do them for months at a time. However, this creates an obvious problem: at the peak of a bulk, people usually have quite a bit of excess fat, while at the peak of a cut, people are usually at their weakest.

    As an answer to this problem, is it possible to frequently alternate between bulking and cutting? As in, every week, for example? One week, you could eat a lot of excess calories, and minimize cardio, while the next week, you would create a calorie deficit and increase the cardio. The whole time, the diet would be clean and very high in protein, and the weightlifting would be consistent and intense. It seems like this would also take advantage of a person's metabolism. When someone cuts, their metabolism eventually slows down after the body becomes used to surviving on less food. Likewise, after bulking, metabolism eventually speeds up to handle the extra food. By alternating every week, right when a person's metabolism is speeding up from the bulk, you would start cutting, and you could use this increased metabolism to help out in the cutting process. Same in reverse for bulking. The idea would be, at the end of two weeks, there would be slight increases in muscle mass and decreases in fat (slight gains, but it would add up over time).

    Does this make any sense? Are there any reasons this wouldn't work, and why do people always bulk and cut for long periods of time? Has anybody tried this? Looking forward to some responses.

    Bump to see more opinions on this matter before I post my two cents...

    -jordan
    Getting back in the groove
    "I'll tell you a secret. Something they don't teach you in your temple. The Gods envy us. They envy us because we're mortal, because any moment might be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we're doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again." - Achilles, (Troy 2004)
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  4. #3
    Senior Member
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    Yeah your thoughts do kinda make sense but I dont think it would work.

    People usually eat at maintenance for a bit and enter gradually into bulks and cuts. Suddenly going from cut to bulk will make you pile on a lot of water weight and bloat. Not a good idea IMO.

    I've heard that you can have good results with eating 500 over maintenance on lifting days and maintenance on non-lifting days. That would probably result in slower progress overall but less fat gain.

    I'd just go for a clean, slow bulk to maximise muscle and minimise fat.

  5. #4
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    or better to carb cycle. Bulking is still around, but I think its smarter to gain very slowly keeping the same bf or less. Tighter skin for sure

  6. #5
    Risk10k Clifford Gillmore's Avatar
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    You could Protein cycle, buy Lyle recommends against it severly.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Canadian Crippler's Avatar
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    You don't have to get fat to bulk. You can do a slow bulk which will minimize fat gain. When you see yourself getting a little too fat, cut down respectively and begin again. Personally, I like bulking hard and fast. I'd rather go from 185 --> 205 in 2 months than back to 195 in a month, than from 185 --> 205 in 3 months. Results won't be much different, but it's easier to guage things IMO.
    "I added some db curls with the pink weights for a bit of a burn." - Rookiebldr

    "im assuming the holy (big) 3 are: curls, bench, legs?" - Saggas

    "had a huge ass burn on my triceps while I was doing those kickbacks, so they'll likely be staying with my exercise program." - Zearoth

    "most of my burned calories coming from something called Basal. Wtf does a leaf have to do with any of it?" - Votorx

    "We have a lot of people like that on our campus, all hippies and things, that go around preaching against corporations, jocks, preps, accountants, and anyone else that feels the need to shower more than occasionally." - Shankerr

    "Damn man why are some women just so demonic and evil.. its like you wanna get a stake and mallet and an erection at the same time." - WBBIRL

  8. #7
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
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    Look up Dr. Squat's articles on the Zig-Zag diet, its really quite genius except that it requires lots of caloric adjustment.

    I say as long as you're lifting heavy and hard and getting stronger, it is possible to maintain a weight or hover around it while adding muscle/losing fat in small amounts. GPP doesn't hurt.
    Squat...Eat...Sleep...Grow...Repeat

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