The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
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    Deadlift: Weight or form problem

    I was lifting 265lbs on DLs and I was scraping the **** out of my shins. At the end, I felt I could do more. So I threw on some more weight the following week so I was doing 280lbs. On the way down, the bar starts rubbing up against my quads which never happens. Is this because of bad form or too much weight causing bad form? Also, at 265 I can hit the floor but at 280 on the way down there's a lot of pain in my knee. If I hit the floor I wouldn't be coming back up, so I don't. I stop right around my shins.

    My guess is that there's too much weight and that my form is fooked. Any other ideas?
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
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  3. #2
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    generally, you don't want to sacrifice form for any lift.

  4. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Y0yo
    I was lifting 265lbs on DLs and I was scraping the **** out of my shins. At the end, I felt I could do more. So I threw on some more weight the following week so I was doing 280lbs. On the way down, the bar starts rubbing up against my quads which never happens. Is this because of bad form or too much weight causing bad form? Also, at 265 I can hit the floor but at 280 on the way down there's a lot of pain in my knee. If I hit the floor I wouldn't be coming back up, so I don't. I stop right around my shins.

    My guess is that there's too much weight and that my form is fooked. Any other ideas?
    It's hard to say based only on your description, but it sounds like if the bar is rubbing your quads, it might be that your back is arching a bit, or your shoulders are falling forward due to the increased weight.

  5. #4
    El Jefe DoUgL@S's Avatar
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    Sounds like even the 265 might be a bit much. If you cannot control the weight enough to avoid scraping yourself up you might need to back up a bit. Your big muscles might be ready, but your stabilizers might be lagging a bit.

    If you disagree then but chalk on your chins.
    Move heavy weight, eat, sleep, repeat.
    Geniuses make complicated scenarios simple, morons take simple concepts and complicate them.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Baby powder, NOT chalk on the shins...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
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  7. #6
    El Jefe DoUgL@S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    Baby powder, NOT chalk on the shins...
    My bad. Chalk is for grip, DOH. I do not use either, can you tell.
    Move heavy weight, eat, sleep, repeat.
    Geniuses make complicated scenarios simple, morons take simple concepts and complicate them.

  8. #7
    5-0-9 Barbell WORLD's Avatar
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    shin scrapes are battle wounds, which means your lifting right.
    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan "press on" has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race." - John Calvin Coolidge

    9 months-20lb gains! (2005 Newbie gains)-A bit of motivation for beginners

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  9. #8
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by World-Is-Yours
    shin scrapes are battle wounds, which means your lifting right.
    That's what I thought...I've always had shin wounds.

    I'll get someone at the gym to check my form. If it's my form, then I guess working on stabalizers is what I have to do in order to up the weight?
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
    Steroid Info Click Here
    The Truth About Steroids (Video) Click Here
    Rules for Women to Follow (Video) Click Here

  10. #9
    Senior Member
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    The bar always used to hit my shins, but I've since corrected that. I now make sure the bar starts right next to the shins which allows me to have my shoulders back more like they should be. For some reason this has helped me a lot. When I started with the bar 2-3 inches from my shins I would have to lean forward more causing my shins to angle forward and then the bar would scrape against them.

  11. #10
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    ive NEVER rubbed the bar against my shins when doing deads

  12. #11
    5-0-9 Barbell WORLD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greathuskie
    ive NEVER rubbed the bar against my shins when doing deads
    Maybe your leaning too forward...?
    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan "press on" has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race." - John Calvin Coolidge

    9 months-20lb gains! (2005 Newbie gains)-A bit of motivation for beginners

    August 2008 Progress Pics

  13. #12
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    may be he just have long arms

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