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Thread: platform for single leg squats?

  1. #1
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    platform for single leg squats?

    Does anyone know where I can purchase a platform to perform single leg squats and step-up's with? I was thinking of using a chair, but not really sure how well it will hold up.

  2. #2
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    Any ideas/suggestions?

  3. #3
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    Maybe something like this:

    http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/1210-12.html

    Although with some 2x4's and heavy plywood you could probably build somthing for a lot cheaper.

  4. #4
    Wannabebig Member Axatem's Avatar
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    If you go the 2x4 and plywood route, make sure you attach the box to something much wider or it could flip over. Maybe make it big enough to stand on:


               ----------
    _______|_______|_________


    I'd make the box a rectangle, 2.5 feet wide by 18 inches deep by however tall you want it, then center it in a half sheet of plywood and screw it in from the bottom of the plywood so it can't move. A half dozen 3" deck screws should hold it.
    Last edited by Axatem; 05-08-2006 at 12:08 PM.
    Chuck Norris can slam a revolving door.

  5. #5
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    Yea, thanks....seems like the best route. I'm trying to figure out an adequate height, anyone have experience with single leg squats on a platform?

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    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    Why can't you do the single leg squats on the floor? Just throw the useless leg behind you.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BG5150
    Why can't you do the single leg squats on the floor? Just throw the useless leg behind you.
    Not really practical. It is very hard to balance yourself that way while holding dumbells in each hand and trying not to let your knee pass your toes.

  8. #8
    Wannabebig Member Axatem's Avatar
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    The gym I'm at has a box that seems to be 2x6s flat on top of a rectangle made of 2x4s, so it's "6 inches" high (actually more like 5.5 since the wood is dry now.) Seems to be a good height. It's enough to get your foot clear of the floor, but you're not high stepping and getting off balance.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Are you going to be doing "pistols" (one-legged squats w. your leg extended in front), or are you going to one legged squats with your leg behind you?

    Either way, it's going to be pretty hard to keep your knee from tracking forward at least a little.

    Can you just use a bench? What height do you need?
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    Are you going to be doing "pistols" (one-legged squats w. your leg extended in front), or are you going to one legged squats with your leg behind you?

    Either way, it's going to be pretty hard to keep your knee from tracking forward at least a little.

    Can you just use a bench? What height do you need?
    I was planning on having my leg just slightly forward (and then wherever it ends up during the movement for balancing). I was just toying with the idea, but it does seem like this may be hard to perform without excessive stress on patella tendon and knee joint. I think I am just going to perform them with the uninvolved leg behind me on a chair.

  11. #11
    A.K.A Goodwinner Goodwinm's Avatar
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    if you have flexibility/balance problems, then just lean your back against a wall, and dip right down on one leg with other leg out, go down til ur ass is below parallel, then drive back up with your heal!. Works wonders! If thats too easy, grab a dumbell in each hand
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