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Thread: Pre-Exaustion Intensity Technique.. ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member MonStar1023's Avatar
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    Pre-Exaustion Intensity Technique.. ?

    I was thinking about the pre-exaustion intensity technique. After reading the Beyond Failure Training article I was really thinking about the pre-exaustion technique.

    I mean honestly when you think about it when you are going to train your pecs you almost have to pre-exaust them because your shoulders or triceps will give out before your pecs. I mean some people have triceps that overpower their chest or delts, and therefore their triceps get most of the stimulation from the pressing exercises. Seems true for back too. If a person has genetically strong biceps, their biceps will take over in all rowing movements.

    What do you guys think about this? Some of you seem to apply this type of technique to training legs by putting your leg ext. before your squats. And maybe some of you put your side laterals before your overhead presses. I am thinking maybe this is the best way to train. Maybe doing a few sets of pec-deck flyes before your dips or flat db presses to make sure that your pecs give out before your tris or delts.


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    Senior Member MonStar1023's Avatar
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    For example a PUSH day employing the pre-exaustion technique might be something like this..

    Pec-Deck or Cable Crossovers 2-3 sets to failure
    Weighed Dips
    Flat DB Presses
    Machine Side-laterals or One-arm Cable Laterals 2-3 sets to failure
    Overhead DB Presses
    Lying EZ-bar Ext.
    Overhead DB Ext.



    That way your chest would be the first to give out on the presses and dips, your delts would be the first to give out on overhead presses. But when I think about it for back for example there really isnt an isolative type exercise for your lats or rhomboids.. is there? The only one that I can think of is pullovers.. ? I mean a back exercise where your biceps arent involved>..>?

    Its funny the way everyone always is using straps so that their grip doesnt give out before their back on pull-ups and rows. What about their biceps giving out before their back?
    Last edited by MonStar1023; 01-22-2002 at 01:01 PM.

  3. #3
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    I have used pre-exhaustion extensively in my training. For a change it is nice, but I prefer the mainstay of my training to be straight sets. I think it is an ego thing, but I just take greater satisfaction out of training as heavy as possible with compound movements (or single joint for smaller bodyparts). I also wrote a post some time back about the difficulty of judging progress with pre-exhaustion after a short period of time. As you use heavier weight for the isolation movement, you will not be able to see a linear increase in usable load for the compound movement. Thus, it makes it difficult to guage progress on the compound movement. This was always a difficulty for me.
    Last edited by chris mason; 01-22-2002 at 02:15 PM.

  4. #4
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
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    What he said. lol.

    I agree... Pre-exhausting can be valuable for the bodybuilder, but I find it personally unsatisfying. If I were to pre-exhaust my chest, then go bench, my bench would undoubtedly suffer. My chest might benefit from this, but then again I don't see the difference between doing crossovers BEFORE flat bench versus afterwards. Start with the compounds, move to isolations. It's worked for me.... I think it comes down to preference, and what your particular goals are.
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    Senior Member MonStar1023's Avatar
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    Yeah thanks for the replies guys. I agree that your strength on the compound movements would seriously suffer dramatically.



    Preference I guess.

  6. #6
    Bring it. DaCypher's Avatar
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    I'll do some pre-exhaustion every once in a while just to change things up if I get bored. I found them particularly helpful with lat pulldowns/pullups. I would do a set of pullovers (usually on a machine, I found it easier to isolate the lats this way) and immediately follow it by a set of machine pulldowns or weighted (sometimes without any weight depending on how heavy I went on the pullovers) pullups. This really hammered my lats. However, I've recently started using straps for pulldowns/ups and have found pre-exhaustion to be less necessary. My grip seemed to be fatiguing the quickest and I've found my back strength to be increasing much quicker now.

    I haven't found this technique to be very effective for chest however (maybe its just me but my chest is screaming after just one set of heavy, slow db chest presses).

    Also, fun pre-exhaustion exercises:

    Front raises right before military presses.

    Leg extensions before squats.
    Last edited by DaCypher; 01-22-2002 at 08:44 PM.

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