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Thread: Knee Wraps?

  1. #1
    Risk10k Clifford Gillmore's Avatar
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    Knee Wraps?

    Okay, my squat is going along quiet nicely at the moment, but as I'm nearing 350 I'd like to have some wraps ready and on hand as my sets get heavier. So just on opinion, what should I be looking at? 2m 2.5m? Rebound/stretch? Chalk free?

    Do I even need to be thinking about them right now?

  2. #2
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    The longer they are the more rebound they'll give. You don't need chalk for wraps.
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  3. #3
    Amateur Strongman Dinosaur's Avatar
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    I wouldn't even worry about them unless you have bad knees. I rarely wear even a belt, I just throw it on if I'm shooting for a new max or if it's still tired from the day before. Straps, wraps, belt....not needed.

  4. #4
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    Get some cheap ones and get used to wearing them on heavy sets. Once you get the feeling of squatting with the wraps, then get yourself a good pair.

    Stats: Age: 34 Weight: 205 Height: 5'6"
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  5. #5
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    Personally, I'd say just use the knee wraps on heavy sets that are near max. You don't want to get in the habit of relying on the wraps for squatting. I basically just use wraps in competition and maybe once in a blue moon at the gym.

    Cheers,

    TommyBoy

  6. #6
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Unless you're competing, there's no point.
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  7. #7
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    I only use them on max attempts or in competition.
    Last edited by Guido; 07-06-2006 at 01:46 PM.
    5'9" 195 lbs
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    SN 209x1 C+J 250x1


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    "Most people don't want to learn new things. They only want to hear about things that validate crap they're already doing." - Mike Boyle

  8. #8
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony
    Unless you're competing, there's no point.
    I don't necessarily agree with that. I wouldn't suggest using them to the point of dependency, but what's wrong with wearing them if they make you feel more secure and safe? I understand the purist's view, but I don't think everyone has to be 100% RAW DOG to be a long-term, serious lifter.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    If you want secure and safe, wear some neoprene or tensor wraps. If you want to compete, use some spring loaded wraps.
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  10. #10
    Iron4Life
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    Anthony... any brand recommendation on the neoprene wraps..
    I have an old pair.. >5 yrs.. a doc had me try out for what he thought was a knee problem.. but I don't think they would be sufficient for squatting safety..
    Thanks..

  11. #11
    Back in business WBBIRL's Avatar
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    Our highschool football coach made us wear them at out foobtall powerlifting meet, although few if any really needed them.

    If your squatting over 500lbs then Id saw wrap the knees up, you'll thank yourself when your 60.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    bear, I don't think the brand for neoprene will make much difference. They are basically used to keep the joint warm. If that's not an issue and you needed actual support, I would say go with a tensor wrap (used for sprains, swelling, etc.).
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  13. #13
    Iron4Life
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    Quote Originally Posted by WBBIRL
    Our highschool football coach made us wear them at out foobtall powerlifting meet, although few if any really needed them.

    If your squatting over 500lbs then Id saw wrap the knees up, you'll thank yourself when your 60.
    WBBIRL.. can you support that statement with facts please.. I'm still hoping to hit 500 for reps in my 40s.. and I'm NOT planning on ever using wraps - just a personal perferance... not a statement. But I like Anthony's idea..

    Anthony.. thanks.. I give them a go.. and go buy a generic set down at the pharmacy..
    Last edited by Bob; 07-06-2006 at 09:13 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I really don't understand buying a tensor wrap over regular wraps... You can wrap as loosely as you want and keep the joint warm, or you can wrap as tight as you'd like to add support... Your call though.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  15. #15
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Because one adds poundage to your lift and one doesn't? I see no reason to buy a wrap designed for rebound unless you're competing. For the same reason I see no point in using a bench shirt unless you're competing. But that's just my opinion.
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  16. #16
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    If you loosely wrap it, it will add zero pounds.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  17. #17
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Agreed. Do you think inzer/titan wraps would be cheaper than tensor wraps?
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  18. #18
    Back in business WBBIRL's Avatar
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    Bear.... I dont know about you but go ahead and chance it because I couldn't supply facts.

    Ill tell you one thing though, if you do end up screwing up your knees its too late... but whatever.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony
    Agreed. Do you think inzer/titan wraps would be cheaper than tensor wraps?
    No, but it'd probably be cheaper than buying both tensor wraps and neoprene sleeves.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  20. #20
    Iron4Life
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    Quote Originally Posted by WBBIRL
    Bear.... I dont know about you but go ahead and chance it because I couldn't supply facts.

    Ill tell you one thing though, if you do end up screwing up your knees its too late... but whatever.
    WBBIRL.. I understand.. my belief is that I can trust my body, or at least build it to where I can trust it. What if it is the wraps & suits that cause the damage? Just like there is no proof that using wraps keep your knees healthy when you are past 60... there is also no proof that the wraps & suits don't actually damage them.

    You ever watch that video of that squatter, where his suit splits wide open in the back? What if that suit is helping him push an extra 100-200 lbs? then there is nothing in his body to prevent an injury, b/c he is beyond his physical limit. And that is too late, right?

    Your body's physical limit to me, is raw lifting. IMHO

    Hence if the wrap is only preventative as Anthony & Sensei support.. and does not offer any poundage support, they I should still be doing all the lifting myself.

    Thanks again Anthony and Sensei..

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