The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Lifting Weights for Children

    Howdy,

    Is there any benefit from a young child (10 year old male; pre-puberty) lifting a routine such as WBB1?

    The reason for the question is that my son enjoys coming to the gym with me and lifting. I like hanging out with him (we tend to hit the gym together when no one is around).

    Anyway - just wondered if there was any point in him lifting?

    Would also like to know if there are any dangers with him lifting? I've found conflicting anacdotal stuff on the web.

    Keep the faith,

    Pakse

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  3. #2
    Senior Member laxguy1028's Avatar
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    No, it would be better to get him involved in team sports instead of focusing on lifting at such a young age. It will allow him to develop cordination, speed, strength, aswell as friendship which is very important. Let him enjoy being a kid and let him run around and do basic bodyweight exercises.
    Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful. -Joushua Marine

  4. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    what he said^^^ dont want to create a D-Bow sorry i was j/k
    weight---> 165
    Height---> 6'01
    Goal-->Reach 200 pounds
    Squat - N/A
    bench: N/A
    I had to accept I was being a pussy and now I am gaining weight.
    Progression

  5. #4
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    Ya, I've been wandering about that, too. See I know this kid Richard Spellman at my school (he's an incredible wrestler and football player), and he has been working out since he was in third grade. The kid is huge, but not Ronnie Coleman huge. And he seems pretty fit and healthy.

    I mean, I'm thinking of having my future kid lift weights with WBB1 at a very young age and also teach him Taekwondo. I mean, I don't want him to get big to the point where he can't scratch his head. I guess that's where the Taekwondo will come in handy.

    I mean... so is this healthy.... for a kid to start at a very young age?

  6. #5
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    Children shouldn't lift weights...ever. Get him into other things and helping him stay active until he gets old enough to begin lifting weights. Football, soccer, martial arts, etc...
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  7. #6
    Iron4Life
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    I think there is a lot of controversy on this subject Pakse... I have the same problem too.. with a 9 yr daughter though..

    I worry about the research that the end of the bones have not been formed yet.. and heavy lifting can stunt or damage that area. Some of that research also includes some of the damage of young gymnists... especially surrounding explosive back bending they do..

    At the same time, I have heard/seen/met several youngsters.. grown up.. who supposedly lifted as young children with no ill effects.. even myself, I lived on a farm growing up, and lifted lots of heavy weights at a young age.

    So as a concerned father.. We (with the wife) decided our kids are going to stay with BW exercises (neither kid was over enjoyed with their gymnastics classes, so I don't have that fear) until they are 12 or 13... and then keep them in rep ranges above 5.. no single rep maxes until they reach 15 or 16... and of coarse depending upon they react to this..

    This is as of right now.. unless I see the research that is the end-all-be-all study... you know the kind where they study 1000 kids over 25 yrs or something.. but I haven't seen it yet.

    So this is not much of a recommendation for you.. but just to let you know there are others out there thinking/worrying the same..

    Good luck with your decision.. and have fun with your son..

  8. #7
    Iron4Life
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    PS.. I agree with the other posters too..
    Get or keep the kid involved in as many sports as possible...
    Unless THEY absolutely love one over ALL the others.. there is no real proof that specialization works at a young age.. For every Tiger/Selena Williams, there is a Micheal Jordon - who didn't start BB until he was a junior in HS.. or Tim Duncan who was a swimmer until a hurricane broke his pool and tried BB as a senior (I think-maybe junior) in HS..

    My 2 kids are into Karate, Lacrosse, soccer, swimming... and they bike on a regular basis.. and as a family we try different sports every summer and going hiking and walking together..

  9. #8
    ANVIL POWER Detard's Avatar
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    i think that if he wants to come to the gym and workout like his dad, then let him do that. just show him some exercises to do for now, let him get used to the motions... then once he gets older and more experienced then mabye he can start training seriously.
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  10. #9
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    For you people saying children shouldn't lift weights do you'll have any studies? I'm gonna be in the same situation in a couple years my daughter is 2 and every time I workout she grabs my extra dumbbell with no weights and trys to immitate me. Every morning she comes up to me and says she wants to workout. So I have a feeling she is gonna be really into working out espicially now that my girl friend has been working out for about 2 months now. Anyways as much as I value what youll say I would like to see studies cause it seems like people are just giving thier opinions.

    I really don't see how it is a problem, I could see certain excersise not being good for them. In the end I really don't know and I would really love to.

  11. #10
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    Gregory says children shouldn't try to lift the maximum amount they can handle until their skeletons have fully matured. That's because too much weight can injure parts of the bone known as the growth plates. These growth plates, one on each end of the bone, are weaker than the tendons that connect them to muscles, and too much pressure can cause them to fracture. The age of skeletal maturity varies, but in girls it usually occurs between ages 14 and 16, and in boys it usually occurs between 16 and 18.
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  12. #11
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    lol chest presses and bicep curls

    i say your son should do some football and some martial arts, he will be ready to kick arse in the gym when he gets around 15!
    2000 or bust

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sCaRz*Of*PaiN
    Gracias!!

  14. #13
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    That site actually says they can lift weights...but you have to take special precautions and children don't work out like adults do. I think it would still be better to get them into other activities like football, soccer, swimming, martial arts, etc... It'll keep them active and when they reach the right age, they can start hitting the weights.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  15. #14
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    Wait a minute the above study says kids shouldn't lift the maximum amount of weight that they can handle. That they should lift for like 15 reps about 2 sessions a week. So kids can lift weights this study says so once again thanks scarz.

  16. #15
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    I already said that, but you responded too quickly. They can't workout like adults because of growth plates, immature skeletal structure, and attached tendons and such, according to that site.
    Last edited by sCaRz*Of*PaiN; 07-11-2006 at 05:08 PM.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  17. #16
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    I'm certainly not gonna push my daughter in anyway and regardless of what she chooses she will still be doing other activties. I want my daughter to be very active that way she doesnt have time for other activties young girls are getting involved with.

  18. #17
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    I did some research about this project, light, lots of reps PROPER FORM. I saw this 12 year old kid, hitting near the weights I hit his dads a PT, said that over time he just graudlly worked his way up the weights never did a 1 REP max or anything just worked on up slowly. Says when he hits about 15 he'll allow him to do heavy reps. I don't see a thing wrong with training a kid (thats willing) weights, if taught by a person who only teaches the lifts he knows well and always watches him it could be very benefitical for the kid.
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  19. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sCaRz*Of*PaiN
    I already said that, but you responded too quickly. They can't workout like adults because of growth plates, immature skeletal structure, and attached tendons and such, according to that site.
    Yea the site pretty much confirmed what I already thought that heavy lifting would not be good. I also think certain excersies might not be good for them either but I'm not sure doesn't mention anything about that.

  20. #19
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    What the hell is wrong with a kid spending some time with his old man in the weight room and "OH MY GOD... NO!" LIFTING WEIGHTS? Absolutely nothing.

    Don't worry about it. I wouldn't try to put him on a specific routine or anything, but there's absolutely nothing wrong with getting him doing some technique work, bdwt. exercises, and occasionally challenging him with a rep record on push-ups or something. If it's a positive experience, he will enjoy the time with you and probably enjoy lifting for the rest of his life.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  21. #20
    Senior Member laxguy1028's Avatar
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    I don't think there are any negative health benefits but I think you should let kids be kids and have them go run around and play sports with their friends instead of in the weight room without their friends. If the child really wants to go but let them but i think they will get bored and will not have the patience to be dedicated week in and week out.
    Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful. -Joushua Marine

  22. #21
    Wannabebig Member
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    Howdy,

    Wow - thank you all for contributing, I appreciate the responses. So far what I'm taking away from this thread is the following:

    Taking my son to the gym with me once in a while, and allowing him to lift hi-rep, lighter weights (what he can do with excellent form) should not hurt anything - and hopefully will get him a bit stronger.

    For the record he is very involved in Martial Arts, Cross Country, Soccer, and Baseball (and a variety of non-sporting activities).

    Keep the faith,

    Pakse

  23. #22
    NITOR PROJECT Guinea Pig Joshua Davis's Avatar
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    Children shouldn't lift weights? In lieu of running full force into each other on a playing field?

    Dumbest thing I have ever read in my life. Hands down.

    In fact, the ASCM has recently published articles completely disproving the old wives tale about weightlifting stunting growth, and even suggested that starting kids as young as 5 years old on progressive, yet controlled and well supervised weightlifting programs to help strengthen their bodies, prevent future injuries, and prepare them for field sports.

    In most other countries, children are started as young as 3-5 years old and grow up to be national champion weightlifters or T&F athletes. Glenn Pendlay told me his son William was doing snatches and cleans at 18 mos with a wooden bar.

    Would Zhang Guozeng have ever made it to World Champion/Record Holder status had he not started this early?.

    For what it's worth, I have a 2-year old son that deadlifts his bodyweight, can perform a chinup and flexed-arm-hang, and one-arm overhead presses 5lbs. I have never "made" him do anything, just directed and supervised him while in the gym. He likes lifting with daddy, and as long as he does, I'll continue to encourage it.

  24. #23
    SchModerator ZenMonkey's Avatar
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    ok, i have first hand experience... typical football coach in middle school telling me to lift....messed up my shoulder(rotator cuff and collar bone). Stick to push ups and pull ups etc, body weight only... swimming is good too, a low impact entire body workout.

  25. #24
    SchModerator ZenMonkey's Avatar
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    also rock climbing

  26. #25
    NITOR PROJECT Guinea Pig Joshua Davis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZenMonkey View Post
    ok, i have first hand experience... typical football coach in middle school telling me to lift....messed up my shoulder(rotator cuff and collar bone). Stick to push ups and pull ups etc, body weight only... swimming is good too, a low impact entire body workout.
    Did your football coach also teach you *how* to lift?

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