The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Thread: No thumbs bench

  1. #1
    Banned Prodigy06's Avatar
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    No thumbs bench

    I always heard your not supposed to put your thumbs behind the bar (e.g. http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/2002/benchwrong2.jpg)
    But I've seen a lot of videos of Yates, Arnold and Coleman doing it that way.
    Is there really anything to doing this?
    Last edited by Prodigy06; 07-26-2006 at 07:02 AM.

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  3. #2
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    YES!!! There is something wrong...it is not safe at all!!!! I had a friend who tried it and I was spotting him on decline bench...while spotting I followed the bar down with my hands not touching the bar...he yelled at me to move my hands...the very next rep when I moved my hands back he dropped 195 on his chest then as it hit his throat I grabbed it. He had to get rushed to the hospital and after everything he had a few brush burns and bruises...talked really horse...he said the doc told him a few more inches down and he would have been really messed up maybe even died. So just grip the bar normal

  4. #3
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    how did that have anything to do with where his thumbs were?

  5. #4
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neon
    how did that have anything to do with where his thumbs were?
    :withstupi

    There is no problem with using that grip or even a "suicide grip" (underhand) as long as you have good spotters, preferably side spotters, too, if you are going really heavy. Lots of experienced guys do it.
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  6. #5
    mrelwooddowd Patz's Avatar
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    My workout partner always does it. I try not to let him kill himself.

    The key to that grip is..

    don't **** up.
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  7. #6
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    His grip had all his fingers facing the same way...thumb not wrapped around the bar...I think it is not worth the risk for the end results...if you do then its all you when an accident happens, i like to be safe...just me though

  8. #7
    Banned bjohnso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guido
    :withstupi

    There is no problem with using that grip or even a "suicide grip" (underhand) as long as you have good spotters, preferably side spotters, too, if you are going really heavy. Lots of experienced guys do it.
    The problem arrises when you don't have a workout partner and have to ask a total stranger who may or may not give you his full attention when spotting you.

    It seems to me that if your hands are sweaty the bar could slip out of your hands very easily with the thumbless grip. Why chance it?

  9. #8
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    I find the thumbless grip more comfortable when doing inclines.
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  10. #9
    Gunslinger bullethead74's Avatar
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    I tried this for a while, but found that it ruined my concentration having another thing like the bar slipping to worry about.

  11. #10
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    what is the advantage to doing it? i dont see any, especially with the risk of dropping it on yourself.

  12. #11
    A.K.A Goodwinner Goodwinm's Avatar
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    its dangerous, be careful.
    But with a normal grip it could still be dangerous, if you roll the bar off your palms and onto your thumbs. Then your thumbs snap off and teh bar still falls on your neck and hurts you bad.
    Oh well.
    The thing is. Dont **** up! lol
    Last edited by Goodwinm; 07-26-2006 at 11:33 AM.
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  13. #12
    Iron4Life
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    I would not recommed the "false-grip"/thumbless grip for the beginners - even with a spotter. New lifters need to learn to control the weights -balancing & racking the weight, get a good range of motion, and proper form.

    But if you have been lifting for a while and find this grip more comfortable, then as the others have said, make sure you have a good spotter. It is dangerous.. even with light weights. crack you skull, throat, etc..

    Otherwise, I don't think I have seen any information out there that supports it is better or worst for your ability to lift more or build bigger muscles.

    PS.. I would never do it..

  14. #13
    mrelwooddowd Patz's Avatar
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    You gys should keep in mind that, if your palms are facing out with a thumbless grip and the bar should happen to slip off the hands, the bar falls to the chest. You arms will be between the bar and your neck.

    Not that 225 tot he chest would feel a whole lot better, but at least you'd live/walk.
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  15. #14
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    eh..

    I've always gripped the bar thumbless and have never worried about the bar falling out of my hands...From what I remember by not using your thumbs you take your forearms and arms for the most part out of play....


    I guess if I wasn't used to it it may feel weird....
    Last edited by munkey; 07-26-2006 at 12:25 PM.

  16. #15
    Senior Member Sidior's Avatar
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    I find that grip puts alot less stress on my wrists
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  17. #16
    Banned bjohnso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrelwooddowd
    You gys should keep in mind that, if your palms are facing out with a thumbless grip and the bar should happen to slip off the hands, the bar falls to the chest. You arms will be between the bar and your neck.

    Not that 225 tot he chest would feel a whole lot better, but at least you'd live/walk.
    Yeah, that would be embarrassing as hell though. I don't think I could ever show my face in the gym again, lol.

  18. #17
    A.K.A Goodwinner Goodwinm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjohnso
    Yeah, that would be embarrassing as hell though. I don't think I could ever show my face in the gym again, lol.
    You probably wouldnt anywayz man cuz ud probs be paralysed.
    i think ill stick to thumbed grip when i finally get to doing benching
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  19. #18
    Senior Member Jinkies's Avatar
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    Theres no advantages to doing it and serious safety disadvantages; I had that bad habit kicked about a year ago after seeing my strengthcoach drop 430 on his chest using that grip.

  20. #19
    A.K.A Goodwinner Goodwinm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinkies
    Theres no advantages to doing it and serious safety disadvantages; I had that bad habit kicked about a year ago after seeing my strengthcoach drop 430 on his chest using that grip.
    jesus 430 on to chest. How was he?
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  21. #20
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    Thumbless grip takes a lot of stress off the wrists and can also take some stress of the shoulders. There are a few guys who use it in competition (I'd say about 10% tops) and the spotters are generally informed and move to the other side of the weight (since it will tend to fall forward instead of back on a miss).

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  22. #21
    Senior Member Jinkies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goodwinm
    jesus 430 on to chest. How was he?
    More or less hit him below the pecs on the top of his belly close to the sternum, surpringly he brushed it off and just pressed the weight back up. Hes pretty beastly but it did shock him pretty well, he was able to prevent any damage besides a bruise with quick reaction and hes extremely lucky.

    At a powerlifting meet ive seen a lightweight ( 130) drop 250 on his shoulder breaking his collarbone from a suicide grip aswell.

  23. #22
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    I don't think it's dangerous at all to me I feel like it puts me in a stronger pushing position, but I can't bench heavy weight anyway so my opinion doesn't really matter.
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  24. #23
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Guido,
    You got the term "suicide grip" confused - it means a thumbless grip, not a reverse grip.

    To the OP,
    I think if you are careful, it is not overly dangerous to use a thumbless grip. A lot of powerlifters use it and, for some people, it seems to help them get a grip on the bar that better activates the triceps.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  25. #24
    WBB Member thegil13's Avatar
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    i dont see enough of an advantage to make me use it, plus i seen a kid drop 225 and have it bounce off his chest. he was fine but i dont think i would want that to happen to me.
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