The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member teenathlete3030's Avatar
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    Squatting Pain in Wrists

    Well, I've always used to squat with the bar resting up on my upper traps, on that little bump (go ahead feel it). I've always used as much pad on the bar as I could.

    I was at the YMCA, and there's a lot of powerlifters that lift 2x as much as me, so they know what they're talking about.

    An experienced guy (50 some years old) told me to ditch the pad and put the bar lower onto my back. Pull the shoulders back, so that the traps make a natural rest for the bar. He said it feels like the bar will fall, but it won't. He also said there might be a little more stress in the wrist.

    I tried it, my form looked great, and all the powerlifters said my form was perfect now. One even joked around and said I'd be doing 3 plates per side by this fall if I squated like that.

    Great, right. Except the stress on my wrists is incredible. After 5 reps I rack the bar and skake it off, pushing my wrists the opposite way to relieve the pain. I don't think it's supposed to hurt that bad.

    When I look in the mirror the bar isn't in the base of my palm, its closer to the middle of the palm, which is pushing my hand backward at however much weight I'm doing.

    If I try to position the bar lower into my hand, I can't do so unless I raise the bar back up higher on my back.

    Please help, I won't be able to lift this week, since I'll be at camp all week. When I get back I have to squat though, so hopefully there'll be some advice.
    6'0" 180
    Vertical 29" Running= 37" 40= 4.70
    Big 3: Squat= 320
    ........Bench= 275
    ........Deadlift= 350ish?
    OL: .....Clean= 270 150%
    ...........Snatch= 200 111%

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    If it's bothering your wrists that badly, then my guess is one of the following two reasons:
    *the bar is rolling on your back because the sleeves of the barbell (the part that you put the plates on) are frozen up and when the plates rotate, so does the bar...
    * OR you just don't have the bar racked correctly yet and the bar is slipping down your back putting the weight of the bar in your hands and on your wrists.

    You can also try moving your hands out slightly and taking a false grip (thumbs over the bar with the fingers rather than under).

    Make sure that you have your upper back flexed as if you were hitting a rear double biceps pose. The bar will rest on your posterior delts.

    Check this thread:
    http://wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=71389
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  4. #3
    Ex-Manwhore KingWilder's Avatar
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    My wrists used to bother me on squats until some random old man helped me with form. He told me to pretend I was going to overhead press the weight and make sure I kept the bar back on my traps (it kept rolling up on my shoulders) Haven't had any problems since then...
    5'10", 170lbs, 10% bf

    Bench:255 Squat:295 Dead:400
    Snatch:145 C&J: 205
    Chin-Up: +135 Dip: +100
    Max Pull-Ups: 44

    CrossFit Lv. 1, ACE-CPT

    You want our weapons!? Come and get them!

  5. #4
    Chillin' LivinItUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingWilder
    My wrists used to bother me on squats until some random old man helped me with form. He told me to pretend I was going to overhead press the weight and make sure I kept the bar back on my traps (it kept rolling up on my shoulders) Haven't had any problems since then...
    I used to have the same problem and I can't pinpoint what fixed it exactly. My guess would be that I flex my core and forearms as I go under the bar. Keeping my wrists stabilized and not letting the bar pull my wrists back, rather my wrists supporting the bar over my back..if that makes sense? Anyway don't worry too much it is something that can be fixed!

  6. #5
    Iron4Life
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    Congrats on learning good form without the pad... that's a big step!!
    I think your wrists are going to be developed the same way.. it will take some time with the new form to get them strong.. and follow Sensei's advice above.. good stuff.

    Also, consider stretching your fingers and wrist in your free time..
    They will get stronger with the additional stress of heavier squats and exercises...

  7. #6
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    Your wrists need time to get used to the weight and the position. Make sure you're not bending your wrist all the way back when you're under the bar.

    And I don't think that dude was joking about 3PPS. It's not as hard as you think. You just have to know you can get there.

    Stats: Age: 34 Weight: 205 Height: 5'6"
    Gym PRs: Squat:635 Bench:560 Deadlift:495
    Meet PRs: Squat:575 Bench:520 Deadlift:510 Total: 1605@220

  8. #7
    Senior Member HeavyBomber's Avatar
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    I have to use wrist straps to squat. The added support makes it a non-issue.

  9. #8
    The Body Never Lies Nosaj's Avatar
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    I was going to post on this exact issue. I did squats yesterday and once the weight got up over 225 and I finished my set and racked the weight, my arm was unusually sore. The pain from having my wrist pushed back and down from the weight of the bar had given me a "dead arm". It look about 3 minutes between each set for it to go away and I ended up ditching the rest of my squats above 275. I've squatted countless times, and I'm not sure why it happened this time, but it was really disappointing having to drop my heavy load squats and replace them as best I could on leg press.

    I have been using my bench grip when squatting. Do any of you guys recommend opening my grip up a bit wider? I'm 6'2"+ and I put my index finger just outside the ring.

    Next time, I was planning on wearing my wrist wraps and focusing on not letting my wrists bend while loading the weight onto my traps/back. I might also try the thumbless grip so my hand is almost over the bar instead of under it.

    Any other suggestions/comments?
    Scars are tatoos with better stories.

  10. #9
    Chillin' LivinItUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nosaj
    I was going to post on this exact issue. I did squats yesterday and once the weight got up over 225 and I finished my set and racked the weight, my arm was unusually sore. The pain from having my wrist pushed back and down from the weight of the bar had given me a "dead arm". It look about 3 minutes between each set for it to go away and I ended up ditching the rest of my squats above 275. I've squatted countless times, and I'm not sure why it happened this time, but it was really disappointing having to drop my heavy load squats and replace them as best I could on leg press.

    I have been using my bench grip when squatting. Do any of you guys recommend opening my grip up a bit wider? I'm 6'2"+ and I put my index finger just outside the ring.

    Next time, I was planning on wearing my wrist wraps and focusing on not letting my wrists bend while loading the weight onto my traps/back. I might also try the thumbless grip so my hand is almost over the bar instead of under it.

    Any other suggestions/comments?
    Just to throw something out there, I'm 6'5", I put my index finger ON the rings
    and I don't have any wrist trouble. Still not sure EXACTLY why that would happen, the bar is pushing your wrists backwards I assume. The way I fixed mine was by paying attention to how I approached the bar, aka if I get under the bar and screw around for a sec, my wrists are usually all bent back, but if I go under the bar, and then raise up with my fingers in place, I don't get any pains.
    6'5"
    200lbs
    Bench - 270x5
    Squat - 350x5
    Bulking

  11. #10
    The Body Never Lies Nosaj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LivinItUp
    The way I fixed mine was by paying attention to how I approached the bar, aka if I get under the bar and screw around for a sec, my wrists are usually all bent back, but if I go under the bar, and then raise up with my fingers in place, I don't get any pains.
    I'll keep that in mind, I think I spend a couple seconds more than I need to before lifting the weight. One thing I realized was that I used to do arm stretches post workout for like 5-10 minutes and I stopped doing that lately, and it might be limiting my flexibility. I've always had a poor ROM with my arms behind my back due to flexibility, so I think that is something I could work on.
    Scars are tatoos with better stories.

  12. #11
    The Body Never Lies Nosaj's Avatar
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    Does anyone know any good wrist or behind the back arm ROM stretches?
    Scars are tatoos with better stories.

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