The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    bar pain on spine? with squats

    I've been doing squats for a month now, but I was feeling the back of my neck and I touched the spot where I lay the bar on my back when doing squats. It was extremly sore to the touch, however I didn't notice this in less I touched it.
    Just thinking about it with all that weight from the bar resting on my spine?? Can this be harmful in any way? Should I be doing something so that the weight doesn't rest on that exact area of my back?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Natetaco's Avatar
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    Its not supposed to rest on the actual bone. Try to get it to go across your traps and sholders, shouldnt be irritating your spine.
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  4. #3
    Banned Tofer's Avatar
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    It should rest on your traps, not your spine...

    Edit: Deleted the second part of my post because I got you mixed up with another member. Whoops.
    Last edited by Tofer; 08-10-2006 at 09:25 PM.

  5. #4
    Senior Member HeavyBomber's Avatar
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    Yeah man, lower the bar a little.

  6. #5
    rampage don't squat bloodninja's Avatar
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    Put your hands out as far as they go and let the bar rest lower on your back.

  7. #6
    I got it like that Sontizzle's Avatar
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    i was going to post the same damn question, my neck is so sore, i tried quadrupling up a towel but it still was hurting my neck, guess ill try to lower it down next time
    Age: 22
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    Starting Weight: 135-140lbs (August 1st 2006)
    Current Weight: got up to 177 but got it back down to 170lbs
    Current Goal: cutting

  8. #7
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    You aren't racking the bar correctly on your back and shoulders. First and foremost, make sure that your head is back throughout the movement - if your chin is jutting forward and the bar is resting on the exposed vertebrae, that's NOT good...

    Second, read this: http://wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=71389
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    You aren't racking the bar correctly on your back and shoulders. First and foremost, make sure that your head is back throughout the movement - if your chin is jutting forward and the bar is resting on the exposed vertebrae, that's NOT good...

    Second, read this: http://wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=71389
    In your high bar photo, you can clearly see that the bar is resting on the spine..

    On the low bar photo, maybe the weight is a bit distributed a bit more to the rear dealts.

    But I'm going to think that many people are resting the weight on their spine, but probably don't realize it.. I didn't realize it until I was feeling around the back of my neck.

  10. #9
    Gunslinger bullethead74's Avatar
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    I have found difficulty in achieving good form with squats, so I have changed to Trap Bar Deadlifts which recruit the same muscles (slightly more hams), but is considerably less technically demanding.

    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...BDeadlift.html

  11. #10
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    what's wrong with your squat form bullethead? It would be best to perfect it... i don't think you can go atf with a trap-bar.

  12. #11
    Gunslinger bullethead74's Avatar
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    Well I'm 6'4" with very long legs, basically the ROM is so long that maintaining good balance, position and general formis difficult for me, also my natural tendency is to bend at the waist to keep myself balanced, so it becomes more of a good morning. I have tried a wide stance but this plays havoc with my knees about 2-3 days after (feeling like they want to pop and crack which they do a sometimes).

    The TBD seems to avoid all these problems for me, you can go ATF by standing on a platform which lowers the bar height, but I havent found much advantage in this.

  13. #12
    mrelwooddowd Patz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodninja
    Put your hands out as far as they go and let the bar rest lower on your back.
    I actually had more trouble keeping things steady when I put my hands out so far. Now I place my hand with the last ring of the bar to the index finger side. That seems to be the most stable position for me. It really makes a difference, in my opinion, to find the right position for the hands.

    For GM's, though, I go real wide.
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  14. #13
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie500
    In your high bar photo, you can clearly see that the bar is resting on the spine..

    On the low bar photo, maybe the weight is a bit distributed a bit more to the rear dealts.

    But I'm going to think that many people are resting the weight on their spine, but probably don't realize it.. I didn't realize it until I was feeling around the back of my neck.
    The bar is NOT resting on the spine in the first picture - it is resting on the traps. If you bend over too far, the bar could roll onto your neck, but if properly racked, there should no stress on the neck.

    In the low bar photo, there is no maybe about it - it is resting on the rear delts.

    I could chalk up the bar and wear a black t-shirt - after squatting, it would be clear where the bar pressure rests.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  15. #14
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    the pictures clearly show the shoulder blades are pinched together.

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