The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Slow but Steady ancom41's Avatar
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    Obtaining Full Range of Motion...

    I've recently convinced my fiance to get off the treadmills and take a step into the weight room. Problem is, she tore her rotator cuff about 4 years ago (swimming competition). This limited her range of motion dramatically. At first I thought: ".. hey.. no biggie, she just wont be doing any flys or cables" But we began to realize just how much this effected her routine. For example, She doesnt have the range of motion to grab the bar for squats. Yea, yea, She can do front squats.. but wheres the fun in that. She tried the light weight stretch bands for awhile, but it didnt really improve her range of motion. Anyone have any suggestions on excercises she could work to obtain enough range to complete a good variety of excercises in the gym?

    Height: 6'2
    Weight: 195 (01JAN09)
    B/F: 11%
    Goal Weight: 210
    Starting weight: 150 (10/1/04)

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  3. #2
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    For example, She doesnt have the range of motion to grab the bar for squats. Yea, yea, She can do front squats.. but wheres the fun in that.
    Then let her do front squats.


    Anyone have any suggestions on excercises she could work to obtain enough range to complete a good variety of excercises in the gym?
    Get her into Iyengar Yoga.


    She shouldn't be doing ANYTHING that makes her uncomfortable or makes her feel pain.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  4. #3
    Slow but Steady ancom41's Avatar
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    There isnt an issue of pain, She just can't stretch her arm far enough to do some excercises.

    and what is Iyengar Yoga? Is that any different than normal Yoga?

    Height: 6'2
    Weight: 195 (01JAN09)
    B/F: 11%
    Goal Weight: 210
    Starting weight: 150 (10/1/04)

  5. #4
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    Yes. Iyengar really focuses on increasing ROM and creating a balance in the body by loosening tight muscles and strengthening the weak ones that you don't even realize you have (and probably don't even use). It's great for therapy and increasing flexibility. Plus it's very relaxing.
    Last edited by sCaRz*Of*PaiN; 08-27-2006 at 05:35 PM.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  6. #5
    Slow but Steady ancom41's Avatar
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    Any links?

    Height: 6'2
    Weight: 195 (01JAN09)
    B/F: 11%
    Goal Weight: 210
    Starting weight: 150 (10/1/04)

  7. #6
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  8. #7
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    Its probably fair to say that she has got a shortened and fibrotic muscle in a part of the rotator cuff (its composed of 4 seperate muscles) now as a result of the age of the injury if she hasnt had any manual therapy for it in the 4 years since the accident.

    Its possible she can improve the ROM of the joint/muscles/tendons/ligs in the affected area with some focused therapy, but I wouldnt suggest weight training as the starting place for that increased ROM. If anything, it will shorten it futher and as someones else said, possibly casue pain and strain a joint with a chronically shortened ROM.

    I would suggest she sees a manual therapist - physio/chiro/osteopath with the aim of maximising the ROM of the fibrotic tissue and increasing the health of surrounding structures so that they can more easily compensate for the damaged area. Techniques such as yoga and its many variations are great - but not necessarily focused upon the rotator cuff - and so may take longer to yield results.

    Augs.

  9. #8
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    i never use my hands on squats.. just let the weight balance on my back ;D

  10. #9
    Senior Member miken5254's Avatar
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    Rehab excersizes may work in increasing her flexibilty and strenght in the RC. Make sure that she uses very light weights for many, slow, reps. Sometimes people have to start rehabbing using a half filled bottle of water as a weight, but the RC will eventually get stronger, you just have to train it.
    5'10 186 lbs 17 years of age

    "Success is a journey, not a destination."

  11. #10
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I used to be a swimmer. It's going to be a long, hard road, but probably doable if she's willing to put the effort in.
    http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=265

    Like miken5254 said, you need to start out very light for higher rep sets. Later on, hopefully, she will be able to increase range of motion, tempo, and weight (NOT ALL AT THE SAME TIME!).

    Also, make sure that she is racking the bar on her back properly. If she isn't, the bar will slip down on her back putting a lot of stress on her shoulders and wrists. You might consider using a manta-ray if you have one - the bar will be secure and higher up on her back, which may make it easier for her to do a back squat. Later, as her shoulder flexibility improves, she may be able to do back squats without it.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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