The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member .maximum.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    South Bend, IN
    Posts
    70

    Noob question re: volume

    What is considered to be a "high volume" routine...
    Does that refer to total poundage lifted, number of reps/sets, or number of days you work out in a week?
    "Deadlifts cure all. If your back isn't getting any bigger deadlift. If you legs aren't getting any bigger deadlift. If the alternator in your car isn't working... deadlift."

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,979
    Quote Originally Posted by .maximum.
    What is considered to be a "high volume" routine...
    Does that refer to total poundage lifted, number of reps/sets, or number of days you work out in a week?
    A combination of set/rep and frequency. Ultimately, the # of reps in a given amount of days.
    There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.
    Are you eating while you are reading this? You should be... --hrdgain81
    Remember, kids, if you type well the Grammar Fairy will leave a quarter under your pillow. The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

    Well, the Blog's (finally) back (again!): Love and Hope and Sex and Dreams Feel free to stop by and comment.
    Here is my newly-created World of Warcraft Blog: BG's WoW Blog. Once again, feel free to stop by and comment.

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    573
    You can trasin each muscle twice a week, doing between 25 and 50 reps each time, and 50-100 reps per muscle a week. Don't go above 100 reps a week for a bodypart unless your specializing, and maybe not even then.

  5. #4
    Senior Member malkore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    315
    volume typically refers to sets/total reps in a session.
    frequency refers to number of times you hit the muscles in a week.

    usually, but not always, the more the volume increases, causes frequency to be reduced, sicne the higher volume should require more recovery time, at least until your body adapts.

  6. #5
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,979
    Quote Originally Posted by JConrad
    You can trasin each muscle twice a week, doing between 25 and 50 reps each time, and 50-100 reps per muscle a week. Don't go above 100 reps a week for a bodypart unless your specializing, and maybe not even then.
    You shouldn't be training muscles when you start out. You should train lifts.

    However, if you insist on "body part training", the routine you pick determines the volume/frequency. There are splits with low volume and some with higher volume.

    The key is to balance intensity with volume/frequency to maximize gains and minimize over training.

    A lot depends on your goals.
    Last edited by BG5150; 09-21-2006 at 11:27 AM.
    There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.
    Are you eating while you are reading this? You should be... --hrdgain81
    Remember, kids, if you type well the Grammar Fairy will leave a quarter under your pillow. The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

    Well, the Blog's (finally) back (again!): Love and Hope and Sex and Dreams Feel free to stop by and comment.
    Here is my newly-created World of Warcraft Blog: BG's WoW Blog. Once again, feel free to stop by and comment.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,645
    "Volume" refers to total tonnage moved in a training session or microcycle. I don't usually calculate warm-up sets in this.

    What is "high volume" would depend on a lot of things like the strength of the lifter, the lifter's work capacity, etc.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    573
    Quote Originally Posted by BG5150
    You shouldn't be training muscles when you start out. You should train lifts.

    However, if you insist on "body part training", the routine you pick determines the volume/frequency. There are splits with low volume and some with higher volume.

    The key is to balance intensity with volume/frequency to maximize gains and minimize over training.

    A lot depends on your goals.
    I'm doing Built's BGB so I know I'm getting it right.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,645
    Quote Originally Posted by BG5150
    The key is to balance intensity with volume/frequency to maximize gains and minimize over training.

    A lot depends on your goals.
    btw, "intensity" traditionally means dividing the tonnage lifted by the number of reps completed, and then dividing that number by your 1 rep max. NOT perceived exertion or training to failure...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  10. #9
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,979
    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    btw, "intensity" traditionally means dividing the tonnage lifted by the number of reps completed, and then dividing that number by your 1 rep max. NOT perceived exertion or training to failure...
    Good point.
    There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.
    Are you eating while you are reading this? You should be... --hrdgain81
    Remember, kids, if you type well the Grammar Fairy will leave a quarter under your pillow. The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation

    Well, the Blog's (finally) back (again!): Love and Hope and Sex and Dreams Feel free to stop by and comment.
    Here is my newly-created World of Warcraft Blog: BG's WoW Blog. Once again, feel free to stop by and comment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •