The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Volume-Intensity by Pavel Tsatsouline

    Tsatsouline, Pavel. 2005. Beyond Bodybuilding, pp. 104-105. Dragon Door Publications.
    The inverse relationship between the loading volume and intensity ('you can't sprint a marathon') is a myth. All volume/intensity combos serve their purposes.

    Medium/medium workouts are the bread and butter of training.

    High/high sessions push one into mild overtraining and lead to greater gains once followed by a taper.

    Low/low sessions are used for active recovery or when the team is likely to go into combat.

    Low/highs set PRs.

    High/lows build foundation of stable gains.

    Then there are medium/highs, low/mediums... Every combo has its purpose. This is a good time to dispel a myth popular in the West, that the volume and intensity are inversely related - the higher the intensity, the lower the volume and vice-versa. Smart men like US Armed Forces Powerlifting Champion Jack Reape and Belorussian kettlebell expert N.V. Galenchik, stress that volume and intensity must be uncoupled. 'Overall load [sets, reps, proximity to failure, rest between sets, the number and order of exercises, the degree of recovery from the last workout, the length of the session, etc.] must vary so that some days you barely leave... and others you would love to do more but can't - the plan forbids.' (Galenchik, 1999)
    Last edited by Sensei; 09-23-2006 at 05:17 AM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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  3. #2
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    So basically it's saying to do medium volume, with medium intensity for the best results. I call bs. I've always had a much greater workout, with good results by following medium volume coupled with high intensity.
    Starting over...

  4. #3
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al3X
    So basically it's saying to do medium volume, with medium intensity for the best results. I call bs. I've always had a much greater workout, with good results by following medium volume coupled with high intensity.
    NO, it's not saying that medium volume with medium intensity will yield the best results... Clearly if you have any kind of goals whatsoever you will have periods of concentrated loading and periods of deloading. It's saying that a variety of combinations are present in a comprehensive training plan and that a large part of building the training base will be in the medium-medium range.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #4
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    NO, it's not saying that medium volume with medium intensity will yield the best results... Clearly if you have any kind of goals whatsoever you will have periods of concentrated loading and periods of deloading. It's saying that a variety of combinations are present in a comprehensive training plan and that a large part of building the training base will be in the medium-medium range.
    Dual factor training, then. Planned Overtraining
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  6. #5
    Baby Seal Clubber ElPietro's Avatar
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    He's simply saying that periodization is an optimal method for training, and outlining the intensity/volume that you should use in each period.

    Not rocket science but valid nonetheless.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Definately not rocket science, but if you are a newbie who's looking for the "perfect" set/rep scheme, it might make you rethink that...
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  8. #7
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    So basically in lamen terms. Whenever you plateau, you'll need to re-organize your routine using a different approach towards intensity/reps/exercise volume.. as one point of perspective?
    Starting over...

  9. #8
    ...and then there was iron Andre3000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al3X
    So basically in lamen terms. Whenever you plateau, you'll need to re-organize your routine using a different approach towards intensity/reps/exercise volume.. as one point of perspective?

    Essentially, yes. He's giving us many different ways of reorganizing your training and their benefits/ ways they will affect you in order to help you determine what way you best believe you bust through your plateau.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al3X
    So basically in lamen terms. Whenever you plateau, you'll need to re-organize your routine using a different approach towards intensity/reps/exercise volume.. as one point of perspective?
    Yes, but ideally you would change things before you plateaued... I know it doesn't always work out that way.

    BG5150,
    Actually, I don't think he's talking about the two/dual-factor training model (more of a training adaptation than periodization model if I'm not mistaken). He's more or less warning people looking at Matveyev's (sp?) periodization model, which basically plots out a inverse relationship between volume and intensity from the pre-season to the competitive season, to not think that the two are mutually exclusive.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  11. #10
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    When I start to plateau I plan to switch to undulating periodization
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/alwyn3.htm

    This looks like a good routine for this.
    Last edited by JConrad; 09-24-2006 at 03:40 AM.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei
    Tsatsouline, Pavel. 2005. Beyond Bodybuilding, pp. 104-105. Dragon Door Publications.

    Hey Sensei, you're da man for posting Beyond Bodybuilding excerpts!!! Could you keep posting some juicy bits such as this one? I really liked it as I've been pondering the volume/intensity question these days. Another good article on the subject is Ian King's "high intensity vs high volume" at t-nation: http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459919

    After having read "Power to the People" a year ago I'm really eager to see what Pavel brings to the bodybuilding table.

  13. #12
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikael
    Hey Sensei, you're da man for posting Beyond Bodybuilding excerpts!!! Could you keep posting some juicy bits such as this one? I really liked it as I've been pondering the volume/intensity question these days. Another good article on the subject is Ian King's "high intensity vs high volume" at t-nation: http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459919

    After having read "Power to the People" a year ago I'm really eager to see what Pavel brings to the bodybuilding table.
    If you liked 'Power to the People', then you'll like 'Beyond Bodybuilding'. As with all of his stuff, it's not earth-shattering, but he has a way of explaining things in a way that gets you thinking about things you already knew (or thought you knew) in a new light.

    I'll try to post another excerpt or two.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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