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Thread: Pit Bull Temperment

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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Pit Bull Temperment

    For a long time now I have been wanting to purchase a pit bull. I know that their temperament towards humans is generally pleasant (when purchased as puppies) but does anyone know how they fare towards other animals, namely cats? We have two cats and if I were ever to get a puppy I need to make sure that they were be fine with cats.

    If you have any personal experience that would be awesome.
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    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    lol @ pleasant temperment and "pit bull" being used in the same thought.

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    I have a Staffordshire Terrier (pitbull) and it's a very well-mannered dog. It plays well/nicely with other dogs and animals. The only problem you may have with one is they are loud. They bark frequently and they never run out of energy, ever. They are balls to the wall in everything. They're loyal and obedient. Personally, probably because I am an owner, I'll never own another dog besides a pitbull.
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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galileo
    lol @ pleasant temperament and "pit bull" being used in the same thought.
    Do you have something to back this up aside from abused animals attacking human beings? Pitbulls are often used as fighting dogs and have a high potential for abuse, which is a lot of what makes up the bad media surrounding this dog. I have personally interacted with pitbulls, both puppies and adults and they've always been very friendly dogs.

    I seriously hate it when people try to classify a dog breed as being mean or unpredictable. It's all nurture.
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    el imposible ectx's Avatar
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    I have never owned a pit bull and haven't owned a dog since I was a kid. I can only speak based on what I have seen. About a year ago my mom called me at 7 am. She was sobbing. The neighbor's pit bull had gotten out. It tried to lash out at my 75 year-old mom as she was trying to get back in the house after taking out the garbage....her cat jumped out and got in the way. My mom was fine but her cat didn't make it and left 2 kittens behind....I have no idea as to what specific type of pit bull this was. All I can say is that it tried to attack my mom and killed her pet. As a result you can guess what my opinion is on them. After repeatedly violating leash laws and getting out of the yard the dog was eventually euthanized.
    Last edited by ectx; 10-11-2006 at 10:36 AM.
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    Get a pitbull from a reputable breeder. Make sure you see the father and the mother. Most often the pup will take after the parents so if you see the father pitbull trying to rip your throat out then it's probably not a good idea to get the pup.

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    II MrWebb78's Avatar
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    doggies are products of their environments. if a doggie is mean, it is probably because their owner is a P.O.S. lots of pit bull owners want a mean dog so they make them mean. that doesnt mean that they cant be(as previously stated) very pleasant to be around.
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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrWebb78
    doggies are products of their environments. if a doggie is mean, it is probably because their owner is a P.O.S. lots of pit bull owners want a mean dog so they make them mean. that doesnt mean that they cant be(as previously stated) very pleasant to be around.
    Someone with some common sense. Thank you.

    So--again, real world experience with a pit bull (that wasn't raised like a piece of ****) and cats?
    Last edited by JustinASU; 10-11-2006 at 10:58 AM.
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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ectx
    I have never owned a pit bull and haven't owned a dog since I was a kid. I can only speak based on what I have seen. About a year ago my mom called me at 7 am. She was sobbing. The neighbor's pit bull had gotten out. It tried to lash out at my 75 year-old mom as she was trying to get back in the house after taking out the garbage....her cat jumped out and got in the way. My mom was fine but her cat didn't make it and left 2 kittens behind....I have no idea as to what specific type of pit bull this was. All I can say is that it tried to attack my mom and killed her pet. As a result you can guess what my opinion is on them. After repeatedly violating leash laws and getting out of the yard the dog was eventually euthanized.
    I'm sorry to hear that, but Webb has a point, the owner was most likely abusive and otherwise a scumbag.
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    el imposible ectx's Avatar
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    the owners were scum bags....renters and recently moved into the neighborhood. I think they're gone now.
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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ectx
    the owners were scum bags....renters and recently moved into the neighborhood. I think they're gone now.
    There should be a very serious screening process for people that are trying to purchase the more naturally agressive or dominant dog breeds. It's a shame how many of them are abused or mistreated.
    Last edited by JustinASU; 10-11-2006 at 11:05 AM.
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    Off of a website:

    Can Pit Bulls do well around cats and other smaller animals?

    Yes and no. A dog is a predator, and it is nave for any dog owner to think that Rex will get along with cats because Rex gets along with the housecat, Mittens. Yes, Pit Bulls can get along with cats and some can get along with smaller animals. Some Pit Bulls get along with the house cat but not with the neighborhood cats - that is because the dog owners have taught the dog to be accepting of the housecat but no such training occurred for any other cat.

    It is not aggression when a dog chases a cat or smaller animal or even a child - it is predatory instinct and should be taken as such. Proper socialization and training will curb that behavior and can create Pit Bulls who may want to chase a cat but has been socialized and trained not to chase a cat. But, as a responsible APBT owner (or dog owner for that matter!), no APBT should be left alone with a smaller animal, especially rabbits and rodents.

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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoopy
    Off of a website:

    Can Pit Bulls do well around cats and other smaller animals?

    Yes and no. A dog is a predator, and it is nave for any dog owner to think that Rex will get along with cats because Rex gets along with the housecat, Mittens. Yes, Pit Bulls can get along with cats and some can get along with smaller animals. Some Pit Bulls get along with the house cat but not with the neighborhood cats - that is because the dog owners have taught the dog to be accepting of the housecat but no such training occurred for any other cat.

    It is not aggression when a dog chases a cat or smaller animal or even a child - it is predatory instinct and should be taken as such. Proper socialization and training will curb that behavior and can create Pit Bulls who may want to chase a cat but has been socialized and trained not to chase a cat. But, as a responsible APBT owner (or dog owner for that matter!), no APBT should be left alone with a smaller animal, especially rabbits and rodents.
    Makes sense, and one would think that if a Pit Bull puppy was introduced and raised with the 2 housecats it would always be around, they dog would be accusomed to them and may end up being affectionate towards them. It's the last sentence there that disturbs me: "But, as a responsible APBT owner (or dog owner for that matter!), no APBT should be left alone with a smaller animal, especially rabbits and rodents."
    Last edited by JustinASU; 10-11-2006 at 11:11 AM.
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    II MrWebb78's Avatar
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    I'm willing to bet that if the Pitbull as a puppy is introduced into the house with cats already there, that there shouldn't be a problem. Especially if their interaction is monitored you can tell if the dog starts to act aggressive then you can discipline it as well. To be safe, always give the cat something high up to jump on or climb to get away from the dog.

    I know 4 Pit owners, two of which have cats and everything has been fine. But I don't want to apply my experience with what should always be expected. I do think it is reasonable that all animals will get along fine.
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    II MrWebb78's Avatar
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    I have a chihuahua myself, and he just gets his ass kicked by my siamese cat.
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    Fury Divine RickTheDestroyer's Avatar
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    Dude. Come meet my mom's pitbull. She has 9 cats, and they get along fine. If you're going to get one, you could probably still get one from the same litter. Pitbulls can be great dogs, although many of you have already hit the nail on the head- people want a mean dog so they abuse them. I will also point out that although AmStaffs look like pits, they're actually an offshoot- they were selectively bred to reduce the "game" that a lot of pitbulls can still have (two unaltered male pits are still kind of prone to fighting).

    In all honesty though- are you and Lor-lor around enough to be able to deal with a puppy? How do you feel about waking up twice a night to take it out? How about not sleeping in on weekends? Cleaning up lots of pee? What are your plans for getting it enough exercise?

    But really, if you and Laura are up for it (practicing for kids, perhaps?), come meet my mom's dog. He's totally awesome, and cute as hell. I know you're just trying to sell the idea to your wife, and she'll be hooked once she meets him.
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    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinASU
    Do you have something to back this up aside from abused animals attacking human beings? Pitbulls are often used as fighting dogs and have a high potential for abuse, which is a lot of what makes up the bad media surrounding this dog. I have personally interacted with pitbulls, both puppies and adults and they've always been very friendly dogs.

    I seriously hate it when people try to classify a dog breed as being mean or unpredictable. It's all nurture.
    Yes, two of my friends have them and they're well-kept normal family dogs and both have a tendency to "snap" when it gets scared (thunder, doors, etc.). Hell, just a few months ago my friend almost got sued because his dog bit a guy on the leg in the park. These are not abused dogs we're talking about, these are generally well-trained and happy dogs. I wouldn't like to see a large dog of that nature get loose in my neighborhood and attack a child because it was afraid and didn't know any better.

    It's not all nurture, that's incredibly narrow-minded. Nurture exasperates negative and positive traits. I had an italian greyhound, who was exactly like every other IG that I've encountered, because their core behavior revolves around their breed. Dogs are bred to have particular physical and behavioral traits, which can be modified through proper/improper training.
    Last edited by galileo; 10-11-2006 at 11:27 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinASU
    Do you have something to back this up aside from abused animals attacking human beings? Pitbulls are often used as fighting dogs and have a high potential for abuse, which is a lot of what makes up the bad media surrounding this dog. I have personally interacted with pitbulls, both puppies and adults and they've always been very friendly dogs.

    I seriously hate it when people try to classify a dog breed as being mean or unpredictable. It's all nurture.
    They are often used as fighting dogs for a reason man, that reason being that pitbulls are a naturally high test, agressive breed of dog that can unfortunately be very unpredictable even after many years of care. I have no scientific studies to back this up, but there are many folks out there who know of someone that has had a negative experience with a pitbull.
    Last edited by Powdered_Power; 10-11-2006 at 11:46 AM.

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    II MrWebb78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galileo
    Yes, two of my friends have them and they're well-kept normal family dogs and both have a tendency to "snap" when it gets scared (thunder, doors, etc.). Hell, just a few months ago my friend almost got sued because his dog bit a guy on the leg in the park. These are not abused dogs we're talking about, these are generally well-trained and happy dogs. I wouldn't like to see a large dog of that nature get loose in my neighborhood and attack a child because it was afraid and didn't know any better.

    It's not all nurture, that's incredibly narrow-minded. Nurture exasperates negative and positive traits. I had an italian greyhound, who was exactly like every other IG that I've encountered, because their core behavior revolves around their breed. Dogs are bred to have particular physical and behavioral traits, which can be modified through proper/improper training.
    I didn't mean to imply that nurture was 100% of the equation. Of course we have to acknowledge that Pits(and all dogs) have the capacity to attack, injure, etc. Those can be stifled through nurture fairly easily. As with ANY dog, the most well mannered can still lash out at ANY given moment for ANY reason. Knowing this is part of the responsibility of being a dog owner.

    Out of curiosity, what were the circumstances around your friends dog biting the guy in the leg? Did it just randomly select someone to track down and attack? did the guy(a stranger) come to close to your friend?
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    another nice big dog to get would be a ridgeback or bull mastiff/english mastiff
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    There may be hope yet. JustinASU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powdered_Power
    They are often used as fighting dogs for a reason man, that reason being that pitbulls are a naturally high test, agressive breed of dog that can unfortunately be very unpredictable even after many years of care. I have no scientific studies to back this up, but there are many folks out there who know of someone that has had a negative experience with a pitbull.
    They were originally bred for power, and yes aggression, but aggressive behavior (beyond the scope of normal canine aggression) is a factor of nurture.

    Yes, as some have pointed out, all dogs have some aggressive nature somewhere inside them (as do all animals for that matter). There is something to be said about people that purchase these dogs with the intention of making them aggressive. That's where the bad rep tends to come from.
    Last edited by JustinASU; 10-11-2006 at 12:08 PM.
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    I was attacked by a pair of pits about six years ago in the middle of winter. They came sprinting across a field at me.

    I was carrying a backpack with books in it and one of them took that across the side of the head. I kicked the other one under the chin as hard as I could. Both were down and yelping but recovering enough to want to continue the fight.

    I was about to kill the one I had kicked when the owner finally caught up to his dogs and called them off. He apologized and I just told him to get a ****ing leash and that it was a good thing I wasn't really the 14 year old kid I look like. I made it all the way to my friends place before the adrenaline wore and my hands started to shake.

    Yeah, a pair of border collies could easily have acted the same way... but I'm not as afraid of having my throat torn out by lassie.
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    Journalist galileo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrWebb78
    I didn't mean to imply that nurture was 100% of the equation. Of course we have to acknowledge that Pits(and all dogs) have the capacity to attack, injure, etc. Those can be stifled through nurture fairly easily. As with ANY dog, the most well mannered can still lash out at ANY given moment for ANY reason. Knowing this is part of the responsibility of being a dog owner.

    Out of curiosity, what were the circumstances around your friends dog biting the guy in the leg? Did it just randomly select someone to track down and attack? did the guy(a stranger) come to close to your friend?
    I was referring to Justin's quote, not yours. The latter two sentences in the paragraph are pretty key.

    From what I heard the guy was playing and the dog got free and ran towards him. Guy got scared and started to evade, scaring the dog, dog bites man, etc. Ultimately, it's my friend's responsibility no doubt. Had he owned a dog that's more easily controlled, then it'd be a non-issue.

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    Fury Divine RickTheDestroyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinASU
    They were originally bred for power, and yes aggression, but aggressive behavior (beyond the scope of normal canine aggression) is a factor of nurture.
    Not just power and aggression, but fighting. Period. Power and aggression came from the desire for better fighting dogs. However, any aggression toward people was traditionally very strongly frowned upon and would mean the end of that particular dog's bloodline.

    Cocker spaniels account for about 80+% of the hospital visits due to dog bites, for the record.
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    Senior Member MantiXX's Avatar
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    Most of PB owners are young skinny kids who think they're tough when they're walkin along... LOL..

    NO, these guys are TOUGH.. AK47's and HYENA's as pets......LOL...

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