The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Somewhere over there
    Posts
    0

    lactic acids, a myth?

    I was trying to read up on lactic acids and found this. Not exactly a study, but I wondered if anyone had an opinion on this?


    Most runners still believe that lactic acid is released during hard or unaccustomed exercise and that this is what limits running performance, as well as being the cause of stiffness. Neither is correct. But not even is the terminology of “lactic acid”.

    Lactic acid does not exist as an acid in the body: it exists in another form called “lactate”, and it is this that is actually measured in the blood when “lactic acid” concentration is determined, as is done from time to time. This distinction is important not only for the sake of correctness, but more importantly, because lactate and lactic acid would have different physiological effects.

    The greatest myth is that lactic acid is the cause of the stiffness felt after an event such as a marathon. Stiffness is due mostly to damage to the muscle, and not an accumulation of lactic acid or lactic acid crystals in the muscle.

    Another misconception is that lactate is responsible for acidifying the blood, thereby causing fatigue. To the contrary, lactate is actually an important fuel that is used by the muscles during prolonged exercise. Lactate released from the muscle is converted in the liver to glucose, which is then used as an energy source. So rather than cause fatigue, it actually helps to delay a possible lowering of blood glucose concentration, a condition called hypoglycemia, and which will cause a runner to feel weak and fatigued if it occurs.

    A more recent addition to the muddled thinking is that of the anaerobic threshold. Pictures are seen of athletes having a blood sample taken with an accompanying caption indicating that the workout is being monitored by measuring “lactic acid”. The supposed rationale is that as running speed is increased, a point is reached at which there is insufficient oxygen available to the muscle and energy sources that do not require oxygen contribute to the energy that is needed. This results in a disproportionate increase in the blood lactate concentration, a point identified as the anaerobic threshold. This is also known as the lactate threshold or lactate 'turnpoint'. There are two problems with this. Firstly, the muscle never becomes anaerobic: there are other reasons for the supposed disproportionate increase that is measured in blood lactate concentration. Secondly, the so-called disproportionate increase causing a 'turnpoint' is not correct, in that the increase is actually smooth and incremental. This led to another way of using blood lactate concentration to monitor running performance.

    If blood lactate concentration is measured at different, increasing running speeds, it is possible to eventually draw a curve depicting the continued increase in concentration as the running speed gets faster. The position of this curve changes as fitness level changes. Particularly, the fitter a runner gets, the more the curve shifts to the right, meaning that at any given lactate concentration the running speed is higher than before. Often, the running speed at a lactate concentration of 4 mmol/l is used as a standard for comparison. This can also be used as a guide for training speed i.e. a runner could do some runs each week at the speed corresponding to the 4 mmol/l lactate concentration, some runs above this speed, and recovery runs at a slower speed. Of course, as fitness changes and the curve shifts, these speeds will change, and so a new curve will have to be determined. This is all very well, but the problem is to know how much running should be done below, at, and above the 4 mmol/l concentration. Remember, 4 mmol/l is a fairly arbitrarily chosen amount. Thus the real value in determining a “lactate curve” is to monitor how it shifts with training. The desirable shift is one in which a faster running speed is achieved at a given lactate concentration than before. This regular testing can be done in the laboratory with the athlete running on a treadmill or on a track in which running speed can be carefully controlled, such as by means of pace lights. Both types of testing are done at the Sports Science Institute, usually for research purposes.

    While useful information can be gained from regular testing to determine a runners’ lactate curve, it is important to keep in mind what is fact and what is fiction.
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
    Steroid Info Click Here
    The Truth About Steroids (Video) Click Here
    Rules for Women to Follow (Video) Click Here

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2

  4. #3
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Somewhere over there
    Posts
    0
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
    Steroid Info Click Here
    The Truth About Steroids (Video) Click Here
    Rules for Women to Follow (Video) Click Here

  5. #4
    Risk10k Clifford Gillmore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,769
    On another note, I'm experimenting with a chemically created emusifier thats based on bovine stomach acids that when extra enzymes are added to becomes a very aggresive polymer which can, you heard it here, rebind meat products back together! Works on the same principle of when you puke after extreme use of energy, now thats some funky stuff.

  6. #5
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Somewhere over there
    Posts
    0
    Just checked wikipedia and this is what they had to say

    During intense exercise, such as sprinting type activities, when the rate of demand for energy is high, lactate is produced faster than the ability of the tissues to remove it and lactate concentration begins to rise. This is a beneficial process since the regeneration of NAD+ ensures that energy production is maintained and exercise can continue. Contrary to popular belief, this increased concentration of lactate does not directly cause acidosis, nor is it responsible for muscle pain or "burning".[1] This is because lactate itself is not capable of releasing a proton, and secondly, the acidic form of lactate (lactic acid) cannot be formed under normal circumstances in human tissues. Analysis of the glycolytic pathway in humans indicates that there are not enough hydrogen ions present in the glycolytic intermediates to produce lactic or any other acid.

    The acidosis that is associated with increases in lactate concentration during heavy exercise arises from a separate reaction. When ATP is hydrolysed, a hydrogen ion is released. ATP-derived hydrogen ions are primarily responsible for the decrease in pH. During intense exercise, oxidative metabolism (aerobic) cannot produce ATP quickly enough to supply the demands of the muscle. As a result, glycolysis (i.e. anaerobic metabolism) becomes the dominant energy producing pathway as it can form ATP at high rates. Due to the large amounts of ATP being produced and hydrolysed in a short period of time, the buffering systems of the tissues are overcome, causing pH to fall and creating a state of acidosis. This may be one factor, among many, that contributes to the acute muscular discomfort experienced shortly after intense exercise.

    Although it is not firmly established, it is possible that lactate may contribute to an acidotic effect via the strong ion difference, however this has not been well investigated in exercise physiology research and so its contribution is still uncertain.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_acid
    Last edited by Y0yo; 10-12-2006 at 09:39 AM.
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
    Steroid Info Click Here
    The Truth About Steroids (Video) Click Here
    Rules for Women to Follow (Video) Click Here

  7. #6
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Posts
    812
    Lactate and Lactic acid are used interchangeably in science literature. The predominant form in the body would be lactate though, as it is a weak acid.
    That's a picture of Scarlett Johansson.

  8. #7
    !!Deadlifting!! Y0yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Somewhere over there
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails
    Lactate and Lactic acid are used interchangeably in science literature. The predominant form in the body would be lactate though, as it is a weak acid.
    But are they 2 different 'chemicals'...wouldn't that be like calling apples oranges because they are both fruit? Or is there some other reason?
    If my calculations are correct SLINKY + ESCULATOR = EVERLASTING FUN
    Steroid Info Click Here
    The Truth About Steroids (Video) Click Here
    Rules for Women to Follow (Video) Click Here

  9. #8
    Take Two Ruffian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    DisneyWorld
    Posts
    743
    The chemical structure of lactic acid is as follows:C3H6O3
    Lactate is created when a proton is taken away from the acidic group, making its chemical structure: C4H5O3

    Very similar but the lack of a proton will make lactate a slightly weaker acid then its forefather. So the answer being, yes, they are different but structurally are -very- similar. Lactic acid has always been referred to as the primary bodily acid (When it comes to muscles) mostly because that is what it has always been referred to, and only as of late has it been found that it is actually one proton lower then lactic acid and is therefore called lactate.

    I think its just the effect of ppl not being willing to change the status quo.

    They are not the same substance and are not used interchangeably in new scientific literature with regards to this. There is lactic acid in the body, but not in the reference we use it in.
    Stats:
    Age: 22
    Height: 5' 5.5"
    Weight: 180 lbs
    Max lifts: Squat:320 lbs, Bench: 195 lbs, Deadlift: 290 lbs.
    Max Comp. Total: 805 lbs

    Picture Links
    Most Recent Pix, August 2006, Febuary 2006, Starting Pictures (2005)
    MY JOURNAL

  10. #9
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,645
    Quote Originally Posted by Built
    It looks right.
    I agree. Looks fine to me.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •