The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Too much diet soda?

    I was just wondering, is it possible to drink TOO much diet soda? I love my diet mt. dew, but i've been considering giving it up or at least drinking less of it and drinking more water. On the average here at school i drink 2-3 20oz bottles. Is that too much??

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  3. #2
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    You shouldn't be drinking that much soda. Any soda is too much, really. Try to keep it to a minimum.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  4. #3
    Life is short..SO LIVE IT! Validus's Avatar
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    If you really want to get serious about eating right as well as lifting I would recommend really really really cutting back on soda. Just because it's diet doesn't mean it's really better for you. I used to love soda....than I got into lifting.....havn't had a sip in a year, and I feel great. Just my opinion good luck though I know we all have our little temptations.

  5. #4
    Son of Krypton Majestic's Avatar
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    He's asking for you to give reasons.

    I'd love to see them.
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  6. #5
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    diet soda contains aspartame... i would never touch that stuff ever...

  7. #6
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
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    There's nothing wrong with aspartame in normal amounts.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  8. #7
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    Is there any evidence that diet soda negatively affects bodybuilding goals? It contains no calories and I love it. I would not give it up w/o evidence

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    Is there anything wrong with aspartame in large amounts? I know people 'think' there is, but anything that would convince a skeptic?

    Another thing is that carbonation changes the ph, isn't that part of the reason why it's bad for your teeth even when diet (the caff too)? If so, that may not be good for you, but that isn't due to aspartame.
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  10. #9
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    This isn't my words, this is cut / pasted from another forum (from someone who cut / pasted from yet another forum lol):



    Jay McCombs debunks the myths about artificial sweeteners' dangers at AvantLabs (hope I didn't break any copyright laws here by copy pasting the entire article). At this moment I am with Jay 100%. What do other people here think?

    BTW, we should have this same this discussion here about other similar issues, like controlling acidity to enhance health (i.e alkaline water), dangers of microwaving (or other types of radiation), maybe metabolic typing by blood type, for starters. There are at lot issues reprsented by some Imminst members as being somewhat "obvious", even though I don't see any science (or even rationale for that matter) backing up these claims.

    QUOTE
    Artificial Sweeteners
    by Jay McCombs


    Debunking the Myths

    “Tonight at 10 on the local news, find out which ingredient in your diet Coke is going to give you cancer!” I don’t even have to watch. I know they are talking about aspartame and that the horse has long since been dead, yet still they continue to beat it. So what is the truth? Saccharine-containing products contain warning labels about causing cancer in animals, but saccharine is now absent from many lists of carcinogens—why? Aspartame has been reported to cause brain tumors and nearly every other disease known to man, yet it’s still an ingredient in nearly every “diet” food—why? What about the new guys like sucralose (Splenda)? Are they going to kill us? Well, I think the best place to start with every story is at the beginning.



    Artificial sweeteners have been around since 1879, and for 90 years things were really, um, sweet. Then 1970 rolled around, and in the world of artificial sweeteners, the sky began to fall. Chicken Little reported the events and chaos ensued. To make a long story short, several countries (including the US) banned the use of cyclamate due to an article in Science that demonstrated rats fed the sweetener showed an increased risk of developing bladder cancer [1]. But wait, there’s more! After the review of a long-term study on primates that showed cyclamate conveyed no risk of cancer, although there was much debate about the validity of the experiment due to small sample size, many countries, under the advice of the WHO, repealed their bans (actually every country other than the US) [2]. Cyclamate was the first on the chopping block, but many others would follow.



    Perhaps one of the best known, and most falsely maligned, sweeteners is saccharine. There is copious research on this compound and to cover it all in this text would be impractical. Instead I am going to try and hit the high points and focus on the widely publicized bladder cancer controversy.



    Saccharine seemed safe in rat studies at first; however, when the progeny of rats fed cyclamate was also fed saccharine, several studies showed that the saccharine-fed rats had an increased risk of cancer (there are many studies on this topic, only the largest has been sited) [3]. As it turns out, the problem wasn’t so much with the saccharine as it was with the rats. Rats have higher osmolar urine, thus allowing for the formation of damaging crystals in the bladder [4]. Humans do not concentrate their urine as much and consequently do not have the same problem. There are, unfortunately, no direct studies on humans consuming saccharine and, therefore, I feel it is not worth mentioning the few descriptive studies that found saccharine benign.



    Aspartame is another widely consumed first generation artificial sweetener. You can find it in everything from diet Coke to protein powders. There are lots of things people bring up about aspartame and the majority of them are not based on science. They are based on ideas that make some non-scientific assumptions. The best example is the brain tumor scare.



    The trouble began on account of rats (again)—specifically, rats eating aspartame and subsequently developing brain tumors [5]. In addition, a study showed that nitrosated aspartame had mutagenic properties and it was possible that aspartame could be nitrosated in the gut (although there is no research to verify if this actually happens) [6]. Combine this with the rising rate of brain tumors since 1981 (the year aspartame was introduced) and you’ve got yourself a brain tumor scare [7]. Fact-twisting leaches, er, excuse me, the media, began to warn against the dangers of aspartame. Shortly thereafter my mom started calling me telling me how terrible aspartame was and Mercola recorded a gagillion hits to his website.



    You want the truth? First the rats. Subsequent studies could not recreate and confirm the findings of the previous authors [8]. In the world of science, that means the study can’t be used to definitely pin the blame on aspartame and could involve some other unknown source of error. Next, the ensuing backlash from the scientific community. Basically, an editorial written by Ross stated (please allow me to paraphrase) that the argument was completely asinine due to the tremendous amount of other common things that were introduced in and around 1981 that could also be said to contribute to brain tumors using the same logic: VCR’s, computers, etc. [9]. And if editorial beat downs weren’t sufficient, the completion of a controlled study evaluating the potential link between brain tumors and aspartame in children pretty much put this one to bed [10]. They found no link to brain tumors secondary to aspartame consumption by children or by their mothers during gestation or breast feeding.



    If you feel like you’ve read enough about aspartame skip ahead because I am tired of this beast rearing its ugly head. A website that spawns “the world’s most popular natural health newsletter” warns of the dangers of aspartame based on some pretty deceptive information (it would not be a stretch to say lies). First, the article creates the guise of being scientific using lots of esoteric words, scary medical conditions, and tactics such as putting numbers in parenthesis after particularly dramatic statements but failing to include a bibliography on the page. It makes it very, very difficult to verify the veracity of a work when the author doesn’t provide the sources he has used (some might even call this plagiarism); fortunately, I was up to the task. Bellow I’m going to try and deal with many of the common anti-aspartame arguments that I see on the internet.



    1) Most sites point out a shocking revelation that 75% of the adverse reactions to food additives reported to the FDA were due to aspartame. We aren’t talking about death certificates after autopsy. We are talking about complaints to the FDA that anyone can make at anytime based on their own personal thoughts and experiences with no burden to prove them scientifically. In fact, a study that inspected people that claimed to have an allergy to aspartame found aspartame was no more likely than placebo to cause allergic reactions in said individuals [27].



    I feel it important to mention something called the nocebo effect. Basically, when someone has negative expectations of a harmless substance they find themselves suffering from the negative symptoms they expected to experience, despite the innocuous nature of said substance. With the public media falsely reporting on the many dangers and side effects of aspartame, it is no wonder so many people feel they are suffering from its ill effects.



    2) Aspartate and phenylalanine, amino acids, are two of the 3 components that aspartame is made from and completely broken down when ingested. The web critics try to paint this as something terrible, mentioning a disease called phenylketonuria (PKU) that causes permanent mental ******ation. They also mention the damaging effects of glutamate and tell you that aspartame will raise blood levels to dangerous levels. One article points to some editorial letters written by Olney in 1975 [11, 12]. A strong part of said article’s argument seems to neglect current evidence that shows aspartame consumption has no dangerous effect on blood levels of aminos when taken alone or with meals, with MSG, after chronic consumption, and after abuse doses, even when looking at children and those heterozygous for the PKU gene defect or diabetics or people in liver failure [13-24].



    Furthermore, research shows that aspartame consumption doesn’t negatively affect brain receptor chemistry [25, 26] nor does it cause seizures—even in individuals who anecdotally relate that aspartame is a trigger for their seizures [28, 29]. To go one step further it has been shown that cognitive function after chronic and acute use of aspartame remains unaffected, even in people heterozygous for the PKU defect. [30-32].



    3) There is also the lesser constituent of aspartame, methanol, or “wood poison” as one anti-aspartame author refers to it. Methanol poisoning is very serious; however, becoming poisoned by methanol from aspartame would be quite challenging since aspartame doesn’t appreciably raise blood levels of methanol [20]. Not to mention many foods, like tomato juice, contain far more methanol than aspartame; however, some critics counter this with the argument that these foods also contain an “antidote,” ethanol. This is laughable and demonstrates a poor understanding of how ethanol acts as an antidote. Methanol itself isn’t toxic. It must be converted to a toxic substance, formestate, by alcohol dehydrogenase—an enzyme that also acts on ethanol. The way ethanol works as an antidote is by overwhelming the enzyme system with an alternative substrate. The medical dose of ethanol is 7.5 ml/kg. So unless you are drinking your glass of tomato juice with a fifth of vodka (Bloody Mary anyone?) you aren’t getting the antidote effects of ethanol.



    Finally we come to the new kids on the block. Unfortunately there is a paucity of information on sweeteners such as sucralose (Splenda), acesulfame-K, and neotame. There are several animal studies, but few directly examining their effects on humans beyond those tests needed to receive the generally-accepted-as-safe (GRAS) stamp from the FDA. These tests are quite rigorous and leave little question as to the safety of the new sweetener. However, if you still feel apprehensive and would like to review the data yourself it is all on file with the FDA.



    Artificial sweeteners have received criticism far beyond what they deserve. They offer safe ways for diabetics to sweeten foods and for the general public to reduce calorie consumption. A can of Coke contains about 36g of obesity-epidemic-driving, insulin-resistance-promoting, non-Adkins-approved sugar. A diet Coke, on the other hand, sweetened with aspartame contains no sugar and zero calories. Perhaps the critics of sweeteners could do more good for the public if they focused their zeal and energy on some of the more important scourges of society rather than getting worked up about fringe outliers in esoteric epidemiology studies.



    References



    1. Wagner, MW. Cyclamate acceptance. Science. 1970 Jun 26;168(939):1605 (PMID: 5420548)

    2. Takayama S, Renwick AG, Johansson SL, Thorgeirsson UP, Tsutsumi M, Dalgard DW, Sieber SM. Long-term toxicity and carcinogenicity study of cyclamate in nonhuman primates. Toxicol Sci. 2000 Jan;53(1):33-9. (PMID: 10653518)

    3. Squire RA. Histopathological evaluation of rat urinary bladders from the IRDC two-generation bioassay of sodium saccharin. Food Chem Toxicol 1985; 23: 491–497. (PMID: 4040097)

    4. Cohen SM, Anderson TA, de Oliveira LM, Arnold LL. Tumorigenicity of sodium ascorbate in male rats. Cancer Res 1998; 58: 2557–2561. (PMID: 9635578)

    5. Study E33-34 in Master file 134 on aspartame. On file at the FDA Hearing Clerk's Office 2001

    6. Shephard SE, Wakabayashi K, Nagao M. Mutagenic activity of peptides and the artificial sweetener aspartame after nitrosation. Food Chem Toxicol 1993; 31: 323–329.

    7. Olney JW, Farber NB, Spitznagel E, Robins LN. Increasing brain tumor rates: is there a link to aspartame? J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1996; 55: 1115–1123.

    8. Anonymous. Aspartame. Review of safety issues. Council on Scientific Affairs. JAMA 1985; 254: 400–402.

    9. Ross JA. Brain tumors and artificial sweeteners? A lesson on not getting soured on epidemiology. Med Pediatr Oncol 1998; 30: 7–8.

    10. Gurney JG, Pogoda JM, Holly EA. Aspartame consumption in relation to childhood brain tumor risk: results from a case-control study [published erratum appears in J Natl Cancer Inst 1997; 89: 1460]. Natl Cancer Inst 1997; 89: 1072–1074.

    11. Olney JW. Letter: 1-Glutamic and L-aspartic acids--a question of hazard? Food Cosmet Toxicol. 1975 Oct;13(5):595-6. PMID: 811518

    12. Olney JW. Letter: Aspartame as a sweetener. N Engl J Med. 1975 Jun 5;292(23):1244-5. PMID: 1128585

    13. Silva LC, Pires RF, Coelho JC, Jardim LB, Giugliani R. Evaluation of an aspartame loading test for the detection of heterozygotes for classical phenylketonuria. Clin Genet. 1997 Apr;51(4):231-5. PMID: 9184243

    14. Stegink LD, Lindgren SD, Brummel MC, Stumbo PJ, Wolraich ML. Erythrocyte L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine hydrolase activity and plasma phenylalanine and aspartate concentrations in children consuming diets high in aspartame. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Dec;62(6):1206-11.

    15. Curtius HC, Endres W, Blau N. Effect of high-protein meal plus aspartame ingestion on plasma phenylalanine concentrations in obligate heterozygotes for phenylketonuria. Metabolism. 1994 Apr;43(4):413-6.

    16. Hertelendy ZI, Mendenhall CL, Rouster SD, Marshall L, Weesner R. Biochemical and clinical effects of aspartame in patients with chronic, stable alcoholic liver disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 1993 May;88(5):737-43.

    17. Gupta V, Cochran C, Parker TF, Long DL, Ashby J, Gorman MA, Liepa GU. Effect of aspartame on plasma amino acid profiles of diabetic patients with chronic renal failure. Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 Jun;49(6):1302-6.

    18. Torii K, Mimura T, Takasaki Y, Ichimura M. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats. Physiol Behav. 1986;36(4):765-71.

    19. Stern SB, Bleicher SJ, Flores A, Gombos G, Recitas D, Shu J. Administration of aspartame in non-insulin-dependent diabetics. J Toxicol Environ Health. 1976 Nov;2(2):429-39.

    20. Stegink LD, Filer LJ Jr, Bell EF, Ziegler EE, Tephly TR. Effect of repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverage on plasma amino acid, blood methanol, and blood formate concentrations in normal adults. Metabolism. 1989 Apr;38(4):357-63.

    21. Stegink LD, Wolf-Novak LC, Filer LJ Jr, Bell EF, Ziegler EE, Krause WL, Brummel MC. Aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults and adults heterozygous for phenylketonuria. J Nutr. 1987 Nov;117(11):1989-95. PMID: 2890728.

    22. Stegink LD, Filer LJ Jr, Baker GL. Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of free amino acids in adult humans administered abuse doses of aspartame. J Toxicol Environ Health. 1981 Feb;7(2):291-305.

    23. Stegink LD, Filer LJ Jr, Baker GL. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults fed meals with added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame. J Nutr. 1983 Sep;113(9):1851-60.

    24. Stegink LD, Filer LJ Jr, Baker GL. Effect of aspartame and sucrose loading in glutamate-susceptible subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1981 Sep;34(9):1899-905. PMID: 7282615

    25. Fernstrom JD. Dietary amino acids and brain function. J Am Diet Assoc. 1994 Jan;94(1):71-7. PMID: 7903674.

    26. Reilly MA, Lajtha A. Glutamatergic receptor kinetics are not altered by perinatal exposure to aspartame. Neurochem Int. 1995 Mar;26(3):217-22.

    27. Geha R, Buckley CE, Greenberger P, Patterson R, Polmar S, Saxon A, Rohr A, Yang W, Drouin M. Aspartame is no more likely than placebo to cause urticaria/angioedema: results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1993 Oct;92(4):513-20. PMID: 8409113

    28. Rowan AJ, Shaywitz BA, Tuchman L, French JA, Luciano D, Sullivan CM. Aspartame and seizure susceptibility: results of a clinical study in reportedly sensitive individuals. Epilepsia. 1995 Mar;36(3):270-5. PMID: 761491

    29. Dailey JW, Lasley SM, Burger RL, Bettendorf AF, Mishra PK, Jobe PC. Amino acids, monoamines and audiogenic seizures in genetically epilepsy-prone rats: effects of aspartame. Epilepsy Res. 1991 Mar;8(2):122-33. PMID: 1648476

    30. Spiers PA, Sabounjian L, Reiner A, Myers DK, Wurtman J, Schomer DL. Aspartame: neuropsychologic and neurophysiologic evaluation of acute and chronic effects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Sep;68(3):531-7. PMID: 9734727

    31. Trefz F, de Sonneville L, Matthis P, Benninger C, Lanz-Englert B, Bickel H. Neuropsychological and biochemical investigations in heterozygotes for phenylketonuria during ingestion of high dose aspartame (a sweetener containing phenylalanine). Hum Genet. 1994 Apr;93(4):369-74.

    32. Stokes AF, Belger A, Banich MT, Bernadine E. Effects of alcohol and chronic aspartame ingestion upon performance in aviation relevant cognitive tasks. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1994 Jan;65(1):7-15. PMID: 8117231
    Last edited by jdeity; 10-22-2006 at 08:09 AM.
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  11. #10
    Air Force Gym Rat
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    Well Diet Soda must not be to bad, since Wraith from animalpak.com adds it as part of his diet. Look at some of his pics and the JOURNEY he is on. I do agree that it should be taken in moderation though. I am a HUGE dt dr pepper fan.
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  12. #11
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    Well, one reason not to drink a lot of diet soda is because it'll rot and stain your teeth. That's partly why I stay away from the stuff

  13. #12
    Demons of Steel and Flesh HP666's Avatar
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    Well, I'll throw my $.02 in here as someone who sees a very good Nutritionist and a GI Doctor for intestinal problems. BOTH have told me that Diet soda is worse for you than regular soda; but neither are good and should be avoided. NOT just by me due to my diverticulosis, but everyone. Sure regular soda has more sugar, but the diet contains not only aspartame but phosphoric acid and Citric acid and other things that are really not good for you. Diet soda basically rots your teeth as well as your insides. I find it amusing that people who won't eat white bread or refined flour, sugar, etc. etc., will drink diet soda thinking that it's ok. Just read the ingredients, it ain't good. Just my input, not trying to be confrontational, just looking out.

    Phosphoric acid: Phosphoric acid is prepared commercially by heating calcium phosphate rock with sulfuric acid; purer grades may be prepared by treating red phosphorus with nitric acid. It is used in pickling and rust-proofing metals, in acidifying jellies and beverages, and in preparing phosphate salts.

    Citric Acid: Citric acid is used in soft drinks and in laxatives and cathartics. Its salts, the citrates, have many uses, e.g., ferric ammonium citrate is used in making blueprint paper. Sour salt, used in cooking, is citric acid.
    Last edited by HP666; 10-22-2006 at 10:57 AM.

  14. #13
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HP666
    Well, I'll throw my $.02 in here as someone who sees a very good Nutritionist and a GI Doctor for intestinal problems. BOTH have told me that Diet soda is worse for you than regular soda; but neither are good and should be avoided. NOT just by me due to my diverticulosis, but everyone. Sure regular soda has more sugar, but the diet contains not only aspartame but absorbic acid and other things that are really not good for you. Diet soda basically rots your teeth as well as your insides. I find it amusing that people who won't eat white bread or refined flour, sugar, etc. etc., will drink diet soda thinking that it's ok. Just read the ingredients, it ain't good. Just my input, not trying to be confrontational, just looking out.
    Do you mean Ascorbic acid, as in vitamin C? In any case, you're wrong.

    Let the uneducated rambling of fear mongers commence.

    Apartame is been tested, tested and retested and nobody can find any solid evidence that it is harmful. Many people have a hypothesis, but not a shred of evidence. Not to mention the largest experiement ever has been going on for 26 years since it's approval and still no one has found any link between anything and aspartame. Before someone states, "But it is converted to methanol in you gut!!!!" , a single glass of orange juice has more methanol. Is anyone out there condeming orange juice?

    Is the acidic nature of pop/soda good for you? No it isn't. But you could do far, far worse.
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  15. #14
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HP666
    Well, I'll throw my $.02 in here as someone who sees a very good Nutritionist and a GI Doctor for intestinal problems. BOTH have told me that Diet soda is worse for you than regular soda; but neither are good and should be avoided. NOT just by me due to my diverticulosis, but everyone. Sure regular soda has more sugar, but the diet contains not only aspartame but phosphoric acid and Citric acid and other things that are really not good for you. Diet soda basically rots your teeth as well as your insides. I find it amusing that people who won't eat white bread or refined flour, sugar, etc. etc., will drink diet soda thinking that it's ok. Just read the ingredients, it ain't good. Just my input, not trying to be confrontational, just looking out.

    Phosphoric acid: Phosphoric acid is prepared commercially by heating calcium phosphate rock with sulfuric acid; purer grades may be prepared by treating red phosphorus with nitric acid. It is used in pickling and rust-proofing metals, in acidifying jellies and beverages, and in preparing phosphate salts.

    Citric Acid: Citric acid is used in soft drinks and in laxatives and cathartics. Its salts, the citrates, have many uses, e.g., ferric ammonium citrate is used in making blueprint paper. Sour salt, used in cooking, is citric acid.
    Critic acid bad for you? Hahahahahaha. Eaten a peice of fruit lately.

    "Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in citrus fruits.

    It is a natural preservative and is also used to add an acidic (sour) taste to foods and soft drinks. In biochemistry, it is important as an intermediate in the citric acid cycle and therefore occurs in the metabolism of almost all living things. It also serves as an environmentally benign cleaning agent and acts as an antioxidant.

    Citric acid exists in a variety of fruits and vegetables, but it is most concentrated in lemons and limes, where it can comprise as much as 8% of the dry weight of the fruit.

    Citric acid is recognized as safe for use in food by all major national and international food regulatory agencies. It is naturally present in almost all forms of life, and excess citric acid is readily metabolized and eliminated from the body."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citric_acid <--- read the horrors of citric acid
    Last edited by Vapour Trails; 10-22-2006 at 11:13 AM.
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  16. #15
    Is cutting down to 9% Jordanbcool's Avatar
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    I only drink soda when I'm cutting and thats just diet soda. The carbination fills me up and I like that it has not calories.

    Other then that its total garbage. No nutritional value at all and a substance that doesnt belong in your body. Its just another fine product of junk that we've made to satisfy our sweet tooth. I'd rather have my calories better used in something more productive. Atleast more tasteful.
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    Demons of Steel and Flesh HP666's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails
    Do you mean Ascorbic acid, as in vitamin C? In any case, you're wrong.

    Let the uneducated rambling of fear mongers commence.

    Apartame is been tested, tested and retested and nobody can find any solid evidence that it is harmful. Many people have a hypothesis, but not a shred of evidence. Not to mention the largest experiement ever has been going on for 26 years since it's approval and still no one has found any link between anything and aspartame. Before someone states, "But it is converted to methanol in you gut!!!!" , a single glass of orange juice has more methanol. Is anyone out there condeming orange juice?

    Is the acidic nature of pop/soda good for you? No it isn't. But you could do far, far worse.

    Sorry, I mispoke at first, I meant phosphoric acid. I edited my post 2 minutes later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails
    Before someone states, "But it is converted to methanol in you gut!!!!" , a single glass of orange juice has more methanol. Is anyone out there condeming orange juice?

    far, far worse.
    tomato juice has more lol.

    I hate you vapour trails, ya beat me to citric acid. Not only is it in a bunch of the fruits you eat, things like citric acid, malic acid, etc are used for flavoring in soooooo many products it isn't even funny. Just saying *** acid sounds much scarier tho, i'll give him that.

    HP666, can you please explain the problems phosphoric acid could pose, adn also assure us that the levels required for said problems are present in the product in question
    Last edited by jdeity; 10-22-2006 at 05:16 PM.
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  19. #18
    Back in business WBBIRL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordanbcool
    I only drink soda when I'm cutting and thats just diet soda. The carbination fills me up and I like that it has not calories.

    Other then that its total garbage. No nutritional value at all and a substance that doesnt belong in your body. Its just another fine product of junk that we've made to satisfy our sweet tooth. I'd rather have my calories better used in something more productive. Atleast more tasteful.

    I thought diet soda had no calories?

  20. #19
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    Great feedback. I too love my diet soda. I try to stick to the lighter colored drinks like mt. dew and sprite to keep my teeth from looking disgusting, but diet mt. dew can't be much better. SO..by reading all the replies diet soda is by no means good for you which we all know, but it's not going to kill a man either. Moderation is key. Drinking none at all is better. Correct?

  21. #20
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    it's not the coloring of the soda that causes the deterioration, but rather the acidity, which is still there in sprite/etc
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  22. #21
    Senior Member beatlesfreak's Avatar
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    Diet Coke rules. No way I'll be giving that up anytime soon. It's 98% water anyway and the remaining ingredients are not harmful in the least degree unless you are a lab rat and eat 28 times your own bodywieght of the stuff every day of your life.

    Life is too short to spend time worrying about diet sodas. I'd rather focus my attention and dedicate my energies toward saying no to that extra helping of apple pie a la mode on Sunday afternoon or passing on that platter of Nacho's on Friday night rather than worry about the big fat ZERO calories I might get from a Diet Coke.

    But each to his own, eh?

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    Quote Originally Posted by beatlesfreak
    Diet Coke rules. No way I'll be giving that up anytime soon. It's 98% water anyway and the remaining ingredients are not harmful in the least degree unless you are a lab rat and eat 28 times your own bodywieght of the stuff every day of your life.
    That's something i wondered actually - could you actually be negating the aspartame worry by giving your body more fluid to expel more stuff from you? I'm not saying it changes acidity, as the fluid is acidic, but if you put in a little bit of aspartame, you also put in lots of water, how do we know that the water doesn't outweigh the aspartame? And even if the water didn't make much difference, and aspartame could cause problems, i still think that most everyone is fine with it. The body has amazing recuperative abilities (just look at these boards, where we count on and manipulate such things), and even if something is bad the body can deal with it. That is the reason that i have not been convinced to buy organic (yet anyways) - even if you can show me there is a small amount of pesticide residue, if it is a very small amount i don't doubt my body has much trouble processing it (just like it does with all the other toxins it takes in from everything, even the environment)
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  24. #23
    Eat Chicken Chris686's Avatar
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    Well, so far I have still seen no VALID reasons to not consume Diet soda other than the fact that it discolors your teeth.

    HP666 says aspartame is bad... but the article posted here was very convincing and had references. Apparently there is no evidence supporting that the substance is very bad for you.
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  25. #24
    Senior Member beatlesfreak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdeity
    That is the reason that i have not been convinced to buy organic (yet anyways) - even if you can show me there is a small amount of pesticide residue, if it is a very small amount i don't doubt my body has much trouble processing it (just like it does with all the other toxins it takes in from everything, even the environment)
    Good point. The first rule of toxicology is: there is no such thing as a toxic substance, only a toxic dosage. Anything can be dangerous in large enough doses. Anything can be harmless in small enough doses. Water can kill you if you drink too much too quickly.

    The whole organic food craze seems like such a misguided urban yuppie fad. It makes no sense at all to me that it is largely so-called "environmentally conscious" people who are its biggest advocates. Organic growing takes far more land and far more man-hours to produce an equal amount of food--thereby increasing the risk for all sorts of undesireable events such as soil erosion and deforestation. If a person is worried about pesticides or other chemicals they should prolly be washing their foods before eating them instead of paying extra money for what is essentially the same dang thing only with an organic label stuck on it.

    Besides, you have to wash organic foods too, to get the cow crap off.

  26. #25
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    The bulk of organic shoppers, in my opinion, are doing it out of elitist and/or fear reasons. Certainly there are people who actually look into what they're doing and make a well thought out decision. I'd bet the majority of the customers buying organics do not fall into that category. Kind of like hybrids lol, but we'll ignore that for now (I understand the saving gas money argument, but ... oh scrwe it nm)
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