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Thread: Squat Problem

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Vancouver, BC
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    Squat Problem

    Hey everyone, i was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on a couple of problems i am having on squats. Whenever i go go down, i tend to fall backwards and lose my balance completely. This happens when i am just practicing the form without the bar and when i am squatting with weights. My toes tend to point up and then i lean back and i lose balance the further i go down. Also, ive noticed that i tend to lean forward when i squat and i heard this is bad. Am i supposed to keep my back vertical as i go down? I was also wonderinf if anyone has had the same problems im having and if so, what you practiced to improve form.

    Thanks, John

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    7,644
    From Athletic Body in Balance, Gray Cook, Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL, 2003. (pg. 46)

    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. Someone who doesn't perform well on the squat assessment test does not know what deep squatting feels like. It's like a journey without knowing the destination. By relaxing the lower back, and doing the toe touch and deep squat progressions, the hips, knees, and ankles get into the squatting position and then set the spine when the hands are lifted off the raised platform. This allows the squatter to feel where she is going. She already knows what the top of the squat feels like - that's standing. Now she knows what the bottom of the squat feels like. The exercise will become an opportunity for motor learning and working out the coordination between the start and finish position.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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