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Thread: Does anyone on this site max 360 or more on bench?

  1. #26
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tru Texan View Post
    Ok, I have some questions...What would be believeable as a 1rm on squat at the weight of 165? Same question for a person at the weight of 200-210? w/ and w/o knee surgery ( meniscus tears)
    I'd believe 500 lbs, even 600 lbs possible if, like acnom said, other numbers were up to par. If you were really squatting 600 lbs, your deadlift should have been at least 450-500 (more likely 550-600).

    As for benching 360+ at 200ish bodyweight. Very doable. I know several guys in that weight range that bench 400+. They all hold state or national records in bench press in certain federations.
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by betastas View Post
    If you squat halfway, you can almost double your squat max numbers.
    Really, how is that? I break the plane everytime...knees past 90 degrees everytime..( I think I said that right) So how far should I go down? And how does a half squat help a full squat max?
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 213lbs
    Current Bench Max: 350lbs
    CurrentGoal: Decent abs, Decent looking body ,and benching 400lbs one day

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guido View Post
    I'd believe 500 lbs, even 600 lbs possible if, like acnom said, other numbers were up to par. If you were really squatting 600 lbs, your deadlift should have been at least 450-500 (more likely 550-600).

    As for benching 360+ at 200ish bodyweight. Very doable. I know several guys in that weight range that bench 400+. They all hold state or national records in bench press in certain federations.
    DL was bad b/c of shoulder injury in football...AC joint displacement, so the pressure killed me..But I did notice I did better when I had the bar that u could stand in....the one kinda like dumbell squats?
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 213lbs
    Current Bench Max: 350lbs
    CurrentGoal: Decent abs, Decent looking body ,and benching 400lbs one day

  4. #29
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    It doesnt, and thats his point. You can put up more weight by not going to parallel. He was insinuating that you were not going to parallel and that was the reason for the huge #'s.

  5. #30
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    DL was bad b/c of shoulder injury in football...AC joint displacement, so the pressure killed me..But I did notice I did better when I had the bar that u could stand in....the one kinda like dumbell squats?
    Another reason why people might doubt this incredible feat would be your seemingly low lifting vocabulary

  6. #31
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    What part of texas are you from?

  7. #32
    Senior Member betastas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancom41 View Post
    It doesnt, and thats his point. You can put up more weight by not going to parallel. He was insinuating that you were not going to parallel and that was the reason for the huge #'s.
    I was thinking about an open letter that Jim Wendler wrote.

    Dear Athletic Director,

    This letter is to inform you that I am resigning from my position as head strength and conditioning coach. I enjoyed my time while at the university and feel grateful for the knowledge and friendships that I have gained. I feel I owe it to you to offer an explanation as to why I have made this decision.

    I began my job at the university with a tremendous challenge. The coach before me did not have the attention to detail that I have. In fact, there was no attention to detail. The workouts were not planned, and the athletes had awful form on the exercises. They had terrific attitudes and determination but have been completely misguided. It’s a shame, really. I look at these seniors and wonder what could have happened to them if they were given some sort of proper guidance in the weight room. I do not blame them. I blame the coach.

    The athletes believed that what they were getting was a top-notch education, both in the classroom and on the playing field. I cannot attest to the classroom but can assure you that they were getting cheated in the weight room. Progressing an athlete when he is not ready, using advanced modalities on beginning athletes, and never COACHING is being cheated. That is a fact.

    Upon coming here, I was appalled, but I had a positive attitude. When I began working with the football team, they were very responsive to my coaching. Sure, they had to leave the ego at the door and take weight off of the bar. But they were doing it right. I began a beginner program and started coaching and teaching. Today’s athlete wants to know the “why” of what they are doing, and I explained to them how important it was for them to perform the exercises correctly. If you wish to know why please ask them. They are as informed as anyone in the field.

    I thought that many of the athletes would rebel against taking weight off the bar, but soon the desire to do things correctly and then add weight began to take shape. The athletes took pride in a good squat and a good bench press. The kids quickly began policing themselves and would coach each other up. Not parallel? NO LIFT! Butt off the bench? NO LIFT. It became a sense of pride with the kids and their attitude was tremendous. You were happy, injuries were down, and the sense of camaraderie built in the weight room was something that this university had never seen.

    But then it all ended. I call it the Quest for Numbers and the ridiculous standards that seem to be set all over the country. There are reports of colleges sporting 40–50 football players benching 400 lbs plus and squatting 700 lbs plus. On one team! Either they have the biggest freaks of nature or their lifting is suspect. Being in the weight room almost my entire life, I would side with the latter. These numbers are being inflated by strength coaches who are either downright lying or suspect lifting. I have even heard of coaches instructing the spotters (three of them) to keep their hands on the bar at all times and to “assist” the lifter. For a bench press, this equates to one person benching and three people deadlifting. Not only does this skew the numbers, but it no longer can be termed a bench press! The same goes for the squat.

    Then there were the comparisons that you and your coaching staff have made to our team. I have told you numerous times the differences between what “they” are doing and what we are doing. You ask me all the time why our numbers don’t add up to other programs. I have given you the same response and have been patient and explained it to you. But it always comes back to the numbers. You want an army of 700 lbs squatters yet you recruit a class of 18-year-old football players. There is a big difference between the two.

    You are always comparing our numbers to other schools, but what you fail to see is the progress we have made. Many of the players could barely squat 225 lbs when they came here. A 455 lbs squat after three years is commendable. They have made progress and are doing it the correct way. It’s not a 700 lbs squat, but it is progress. If you want a bigger squat, start recruiting guys that can squat 500 lbs with perfect form as freshman. Just a note—they are hard to find.

    I am not about to sacrifice my integrity and the safety of our athletes for a number. If you are willing to look a parent in the eye and tell them that their kid’s health and performance is secondary to your quest for a number, then I can live with that. What I can’t live with is being part of a staff that believes this to be true. So after defending my stance for so long, and it falling on deaf ears, I have chosen to resign.

    Thank you for allowing me to be part of the university and the athletes’ lives. I wish you continued success in the future.

    Sincerely,

    Every damn strength coach who is frustrated by the fact that the profession has become a game of numbers rather than a continued quest for improvement and excellence.

    Copyright© 2006 Elite Fitness Systems.
    His statement about "SO MANY people in TX were putting up numbers" made me think about this article.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancom41 View Post
    What part of texas are you from?
    Killeen TX
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 213lbs
    Current Bench Max: 350lbs
    CurrentGoal: Decent abs, Decent looking body ,and benching 400lbs one day

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by betastas View Post
    I was thinking about an open letter that Jim Wendler wrote.



    His statement about "SO MANY people in TX were putting up numbers" made me think about this article.
    Good one betastas, gotta give u that one! All of you have proven ur point, u'd have to see it to believe it..thats cool. The point I was making in the beginning is that I know people that will blow the numbers on that standards/chart away (the site posted above) According to it, I'm currently advanced in bench and my goal before this site was elite...and I SUCK AT BENCH....But u all have proven ur point, and w/o video from 1998 (which these forums, and posting vids wasn't even common) I don't have one...Again, does anyone know what some competing !rm would be for someone at 200 lbs, or 220 lbs in squat??
    Last edited by Tru Texan; 11-29-2006 at 03:33 PM.
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 213lbs
    Current Bench Max: 350lbs
    CurrentGoal: Decent abs, Decent looking body ,and benching 400lbs one day

  10. #35
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    For a bench press, this equates to one person benching and three people deadlifting. Not only does this skew the numbers, but it no longer can be termed a bench press! The same goes for the squat.
    That made me laugh.

  11. #36
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    Google them. But with a 600lb squat, your bench should OWN! lol. Where is killeen? Is that west texas?

  12. #37
    Senior Member betastas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tru Texan View Post
    Good one betastas, gotta give u that one! All of you have proven ur point, u'd have to see it to believe it..thats cool. The point I was making in the beginning is that I know people that will blow the numbers on that standards/chart away (the site posted above) According to it, I'm currently advanced in bench and my goal before this site was elite...and I SUCK AT BENCH....But u all have proven ur point, and w/o video from 1998 (which these forums, and posting vids wasn't even common) I don't have one...Again, does anyone know what some competing !rm would be for someone at 200 lbs, or 220 lbs in squat??
    Not saying you cant do it, but it does sound really unrealistic. Why would you have quit lifting if you were doing that well?

  13. #38
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    In all likelihood you are either (a) lying or (b) using poor form that wouldn't count in competition.

    It's entirely possible that you're some freak of nature that, in high school, was world class in the squat, but I think that's unlikely.

    I mean, a 600 lb squat, (based on your posts I'm assuming) with no lifting gear, with no steroids, at 165 lbs, in high school, and in all likelihood without the greatest training .... this just seems extraordinarily unlikely. If it's true, then with equipment, steroids, a nutrition and powerlifting coach, and with 10 years, you'd have a great chance of breaking the world record (870 lbs at that weight with equipment).

  14. #39
    Senior Member Anthony's Avatar
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    Closing down before things get out of hand. If you want to argue about lifts without proof, please do so via PM or email ... not much point in having it on the forums.

    Thanks guys!
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