The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I can't squat. No matter what I do I'm in pain.

    It's my upper body that's killing me. I can't figure out how to properly hold the bar. I've watched how other guys do it and I've tried pretty much every possible height level, but it's no good. See, my options are hold the bar on top my shoulders; however, I've been told as the weight gets heavier this can cause neck injury, not too mention my spine and shoulders are so boney it's hard comfortable to hold the bar there. Otherwise I can do like most people do and hold it lower on the upper-back region...the problem here is I can't for the life of me keep it in that spot, and as I squat the bar sinks lower and lower until it nearly touched the insides of my elbows. That hurts like the dickens, let me tell ya >_>

    So when I'm squatting I'm more concerned with the pain than the squat no matter what I do. I only squat 135 which feels really light, but I wouldn't dare add more weight considering I can't even finish my sets as is (I generally have to rack up before I hit 6 reps for fear of seriously injuring something).

    This is just depressing because I don't know how to fix this, and I REALLY want to be able to do squats. Help?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member betastas's Avatar
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    Pinch your upper back together. Drive your shoulder blades together as hard as you can, and then do it harder. You need a very solid base to set unrack the bar with, so set your shoulder blades before you attempt it.

    If you don't keep your back tight, you will have difficulty. You may feel some pain at the start, but experiment and find what works. You do not put the bar on your neck. You put the bar on your traps, or else you put it across your rear delts. Either way, you need a very tight upper back, so get practicing and stop complaining. Anyone can do it.

  4. #3
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    Well that makes sense, I guess. I should've thought of that myself >__>

  5. #4
    Senior Member Levantar's Avatar
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    Have you ever tried Zercher squats? It will solve your problem of bar placment and your biceps will get a nice little workout at the same time.

    Here are some youtube links showing the zercher squat (incase you are unfamiliar with it as I was 2 months ago)

    1. (An explanation) http://ironbarbell.com/Articles/Zercher.html

    2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R33j9zn1po4 (the 3rd, 4th, and 5th sets he does are zerchers)

    3. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9t-a...elated&search=

    4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14e12...elated&search=

    Hope that helps.

  6. #5
    Wannabebig Member
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    My suggestion would be to start light and work on your form. Keep your hands pretty tight - narrow grip on the bar, forearms at 90 degrees to your arms/biceps. This will allow you to flex your back/trap muscles and that's where you rest the bar.

    Also, get one of those foam bar pads - helps tremendously.

  7. #6
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    Yeah, use a pad if you have to ^

    If your goal is to get bigger, there really is no substitute for squats. And it will get more comfortable for you as you do them more often.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Here's a thread about bar placement: http://wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=71389

    It will help to pack some muscle on your upper back too... You really have to focus on keeping it tight, like a rear-double-bicep pose...

    Make sure that the sleeves of the bar (the part that you put the plates on) is rotating smoothly and freely - if it isn't, when the plates rotate the bar will roll on your back.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  9. #8
    THUNDER THIGHS! Fuzzy's Avatar
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    Make sure you make that muscle shelf.

    I was getting bruises on my traps till I fixed it.
    Being a strong teenager means nothing.

    My wrists hurt, but some people don't have wrists to be sore. My knees have tendinitis, but some people don't have legs to get tendinitis in. I seem to be going backwards with training, yet some people can't even walk let alone lift 400 pounds on a daily basis.

    Dust out the vagina, and keep on lifting.

  10. #9
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    When I do squats my knees start hurting the following day. My question is, Is doing squats bad for your kness, especially when you get older?

  11. #10
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    Using a cambered bar for squatting has helped me enormously. I can keep the bar in the right position despite poor shoulder flexibility. This may help you.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by theman View Post
    When I do squats my knees start hurting the following day. My question is, Is doing squats bad for your kness, especially when you get older?
    Two form problems caused me knee pain. The 1st was bending at the knees to start the movement instead of rolling backwards with the hips as if about to sit down in a chair.

    The 2nd is a tendancy for inward knee movement coming out of the hole. Concentrating on pushing the knees outwards as I push up has helped with this.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by theman View Post
    When I do squats my knees start hurting the following day. My question is, Is doing squats bad for your kness, especially when you get older?
    DanzOz gave you a great advice. I'm not sure what your form is like or whether you are doing partials or full squats. I would go back to the basics and work on form. That's what I did. Make sure you warm up properly. As Danz said, as you come down, stick you butt out as if you were goint to sit and push your knees out at the same time. Coming up, maintain the form and make an effort to push your knees out as you come up as well.

    When I started learning this technique, I started without the bar first, as it was the easiest. Then, added the bar to maintain the form and from there, work your way up in weight.

    At the time, I've read an article on squatting, proper form, bar placement, etc. Can't remember where I got it from though.

  14. #13
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    Thanks for all the advice. I haven;t tried anything enw yet (and probably won;t until Friday; my next leg day), but everything so far makes sense to me and I think it should work, even if not immidiately, I have to put in the time like everyone else.

    I'm curious about Zerchers now, though. Mostly because I've never heard of them before this thread. Why are they less popular than regular squats? I'm sure it works the muscles differently, but just slightly, or is it like a whole new lift?

  15. #14
    Kirk
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    Quote Originally Posted by betastas View Post
    Pinch your upper back together. Drive your shoulder blades together as hard as you can, and then do it harder. You need a very solid base to set unrack the bar with, so set your shoulder blades before you attempt it.

    If you don't keep your back tight, you will have difficulty. You may feel some pain at the start, but experiment and find what works. You do not put the bar on your neck. You put the bar on your traps, or else you put it across your rear delts. Either way, you need a very tight upper back, so get practicing and stop complaining. Anyone can do it.

    I agree with betastas with pinching your shoulder blades togather; it will build a platformof muscle to balance the bar on but if you still continue to have problems you might think about using aTop Squat. Dave Draper desugned it specifically to stop the pressure that is put on the neck area by the bar. torque athletic has more information on the subject.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by falcon123 View Post
    push your knees out at the same time. Coming up, maintain the form and make an effort to push your knees out as you come up as well.
    Don't you mean "push your knees in"? If I push my knees out, that is in front of my toes, which can lead to PAIN

  17. #16
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    Pratice doing a squat throughout the day. Some people will make fun of me for doing this,but that's how I learned. I am just adding deadlifts to my workout and have been praticing the form a lot. Watch the videos and do the form while you watch. Watch the videos like 50 times!
    Have someone at the gym critiqe your form. Most pro-squaters don't mind and kinda like to. I have someone critiqe my form on deads. When I first started he's like "don't lean foward so much". So I didn't and I felt it in the appropriate group.
    One more thing. Squats and Deadlifts take a CRAP outta your wind. Do them first. Especially if you are moving up 5 pounds total a week! It takes a crap outts you
    Sorry yet another thing. DON'T BE TO PRIDEFUL TO GO DOWN IN WIEGHT!!! If your form is bad and you don't do a full squat lower the wieght.


    MOST IMPORTANTLY, REMEMBER WORKING OUT IS FOR YOU AND TO HAVE FUN WITH IT! It's about staying healthy!

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