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Thread: bullcrap? yes or no?

  1. #1
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    bullcrap? yes or no?

    Ok so I coudlnt learn the deadlift so I got five sessions with a trainer. He didn't show me how to do one this first time so im made him promise next time. Did I mention he's trying to get me to spend 1,500 bucks on training which is a ****load of money that I can't afford. I paid 100 dollars for these by the way. He doesnt know I don't have 1,500 though

    heres what he said

    -you need to switch your workout routine every three weeks and doing deadlifts,squats, and bench and moving up each week will platue you wont make gaines

    - the 1,500 covers supposed insurance cause hes liable if i get hurt



    call me crazy guys but if you push yourself on deadlifts,squats, bench with a bar and wieght YOU WILL MOVE UP AND MAKE GAINS!!

    Is he full of **** and trying to sell me?

  2. #2
    Former Fatass Unreal's Avatar
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    Gains depend more if you just push yourself on those lifts. You could push yourself everytime and not make gains.
    Nick V

  3. #3
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    ok im confused....
    pushing yourself on all those with good form will make gains correct?

  4. #4
    Former Fatass Unreal's Avatar
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    Not unless diet and rest and other factors are also correct.
    Nick V

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    bumo

  6. #6
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    here talk to me on aim

    anyway so if you ate well,rested, and pushed yourself you will make gains correct?

  7. #7
    Former Fatass Unreal's Avatar
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    For example, if you push yourself and do those 5x a week, pushing yourself, always maxing out, while eating junk and only 1500 calories a day, your not going to get anything besides burntout and injured. If you do those in a good scheduled program while eating enough to grow, you'll make great gains.
    Nick V

  8. #8
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    thanks man can you give me a link on what calories to eat?

  9. #9
    Senior Member BFGUITAR's Avatar
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    I think the question is what to eat, not what calories because 1 calorie is the same from a chocolate bar and from fruit.

    I dont where wher eit is but there is a thread called "What a body builder eats" and it should have everything.

    Deadlifts and squats are two excersises you should never stop doing.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jinkies's Avatar
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    Unless hes pulling 500+ himself I wouldn't listen to him.

  11. #11
    Senior Member jtteg_x's Avatar
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    dont watse your money. when i firsted starting deadlifting, id check up on this site: http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/...BDeadlift.html

    i kept searching on the net for better details, technique, etc. lucky enough, there were 2 fairly big guys at the gym that were willing to help me out for a quick 10min lesson (for free of course). i took their advice and now im pulling 495lb as a PR from 115lb back in 2005. the only back related injury i ever got was from GM's due to poor form.

  12. #12
    Dynamo
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    I have no clairvoyant advice on trainers, but I can tell you this.

    Old and Fat people have trainers at my gym.

    Any trainer who focuses on keeping you ignorant and needing them (you have to constantly change your routine) sounds more to me like they are training to get big gains in their bank account more than they are going to train you.

    Training seems like a tough game to be in I don't think you are going to find many trainers that want to train you in the dead lift because yes you have legal recourse if you mess yourself up while they are training you. Thus the trainers at my gym stick to isolation machines, medicine balls and unweighted walking lunges (basically calinsthetics.)

    This is my own experience but if I saw a trainer that was helping people go heavy and make big gains I might consider it. I guess I hang in the wrong places
    The mind is a dynamo, a source of vital energy. That energy can be negative and work against you, or you can harness it ... - Arnold Scwarzenegger
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  13. #13
    Dynamo
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    Also like many jobs there are those that are honest great people but to me trainers are probably 5 rungs up the ladder from lawyers and used car dealers
    The mind is a dynamo, a source of vital energy. That energy can be negative and work against you, or you can harness it ... - Arnold Scwarzenegger
    My Comic
    195 lbs.
    Bench - 235(5)6
    Squat - 335(5)7
    Deadlift - 405(5)5

    Goal: To be massive, yet remain dashingly handsome.

  14. #14
    Do that voodoo that he do
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    You will certainly plateau eventually just by doing those lifts. Otherwise everyone that had been lifting for a few years would be squatting, deadlifting, and benching a grand.

    That being said, there aren't many lifts that will give you a better bang for your buck, especially as a new trainee (which you obviously are based on your questions). Learning to do these lifts well will help you a lot on the way, especially as you continue to study and learn more.

    He's definitely trying to sell you. That's what he does for a living. He doesn't get paid if you don't buy, plain and simple. He should also be trying to help you, but it sounds like he's a fairly inexperienced or unknowledgable trainer. There's no need to change one's workout every three weeks, for example, unless you plan for it and want to.

    A good trainer should freely give information. It establishes them as an expert. There's no need to hide info from potential clients. Obviously a good trainer won't let you sit there and pick them dry (that's a waste of their time), but they certainly won't be vague or wishy-washy. I've always found it better to be free with information. Usually the more information I give the more likely people are to buy from me. If I answer someone's question directly and they decide that they don't need me as a trainer, they're left with a good feeling about me. Down the road, when someone mentions to them that they'd like a trainer, who's name do you think comes up? Trainers that hoard information usually don't have a lot of it to give.
    Last edited by Isaac Wilkins; 03-13-2007 at 03:23 PM.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member DNL's Avatar
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    man i wouldn't spend $15 left alone $1500. Well i would spend $15 if the guy was a deadlift or powerlifting specialist who's holding a seminar or something. I mean there are alot of good and free resources online.

    3 years ago there was exrx.net now you got youtube

  16. #16
    AM MMA Fighter crazedwombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by future_engineer View Post
    Ok so I coudlnt learn the deadlift so I got five sessions with a trainer. He didn't show me how to do one this first time so im made him promise next time. Did I mention he's trying to get me to spend 1,500 bucks on training which is a ****load of money that I can't afford. I paid 100 dollars for these by the way. He doesnt know I don't have 1,500 though

    heres what he said

    -you need to switch your workout routine every three weeks and doing deadlifts,squats, and bench and moving up each week will platue you wont make gaines

    - the 1,500 covers supposed insurance cause hes liable if i get hurt



    call me crazy guys but if you push yourself on deadlifts,squats, bench with a bar and wieght YOU WILL MOVE UP AND MAKE GAINS!!

    Is he full of **** and trying to sell me?

    The trainer is full of it. eating and sleeping plus the 3 big lifts you'll make gains for a long time, especially if you're just starting. maybe later you'll need to add a change but doing one technique on anything and EVENTUALLY you'll plateau but since you're just starting on the DL, it'd take awhile.

    switching your routine every 3 weeks is a generalization and bs, I switch it up when I have 2 weeks of a plateau. Sometimes you could go 4 months without plateauing, sometimes 3 weeks, its all individual and effort and where you are in your training.

    Find a new trainer. Look around your gym for one that looks like he lifts the big 3, not hard to find. lanky or stringy dudes dont do them. as for legalities, any real trainer makes you sign a paper that if you hurt yourself, he isnt liable unless there's gross negligence. Curving your back when he teaches you the correct form is not gross negligence. So for legal issues, thats just an excuse.

    As a trainer I will train clients until theyre at a point they can safely go on their own, if in the future they plateau, then they can come back and I can help them out. The SUPPOSED use for a trainer is to educate you on your training and steer you in the direction of the goals you want to acheive and make it so you can go off on your own, not need them forever.
    Last edited by crazedwombat; 03-13-2007 at 03:42 PM.
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  17. #17
    Dynamo
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    Borris seems to be a trainer and he hit the nail on the head. Hes someone I would consider because of the open and honest stuff. You asked a direct question starting out and this guy side stepped it. Not a good sign, it doesn't sound like his goals and yours are in line.
    The mind is a dynamo, a source of vital energy. That energy can be negative and work against you, or you can harness it ... - Arnold Scwarzenegger
    My Comic
    195 lbs.
    Bench - 235(5)6
    Squat - 335(5)7
    Deadlift - 405(5)5

    Goal: To be massive, yet remain dashingly handsome.

  18. #18
    Getting Swole hoser813's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carter View Post
    but to me trainers are probably 5 rungs up the ladder from used car dealers
    its ****ty to think about it but you are right... they make money by making sales. They try to sell their services to people. When you see threads on here like "so this dumbass trainer comes up to me and says [...]", its just trainers trying to get you to pay for their services. And like in any kind of sales, there are legitimate people and there are shady people just wanting your money.
    "Everybody wants to be a bodybuilder, but nobody wants to lift no heavy ass weight!" - Ronnie Coleman

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  19. #19
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    You need good form to properly lift so kudos to you for taking the right steps and getting some help.

    Gaining muscle and strength is a body system, it includes many different factors working together.

    1. You need a good routine. No one routine is better than the other. You have to find what works best for you. Just make sure the routine is hitting all the muscle groups with the proper splits and set count.
    2. You need a good diet. No junk, lots of protien, veges, good carbs, fibor, and all that good stuff.
    3. Good form as mentioned above. You may be able to do 300lbs on the bench...but its meaningless if you only go down half way. You may be able to do 135lbs on the curls but its meaningless if you throw your back into it. Good form is a must.
    4. Find the routine that works for you and stick with it until you are no longer making gains. If you find that one workout doesn't work, try another. Its a trial and error situation that may take time.
    5. Gotta push yourself. Set small goals like: Next week I'm going to bumb up my weight 5lbs and try a full set. When you think you can't get that last rep up...push extra hard. You get out what you put in.

  20. #20
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    I've had two sessions with trainers so far, and both of them were free (something my gym membership came with). Both guys really didn't help me. They gave me the wrong advice on forms and just basically gave me a standard workout that I could've gotten out of Men's Health.

    In any case, I seriously wouldn't shell out that kinda cash for a trainer, period. Granted, there are these Hollywood celeb trainers that help make celebs like Will Smith and Paul Jane 35 pounds heavier in just six months, but those guys probably charge a thousand bucks per session.

    Just go online and check out form videos and try to figure it out yourself. You'll probably get injured for doing something wrong here and there, but this happens regardless of whether you have a trainer or not, 'cause everyone has a different ROM. You'll have everything down in a year.

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