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Thread: How to 'correctly' use knee wraps when squatting/deadlifting?

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    How to 'correctly' use knee wraps when squatting/deadlifting?

    Hi everyone

    am new to bodybuilding and really enjoy doing the squats and deadlifts in the WBB1 routine. But because of my history of running, my knee caps are a little loose and will like to protect them when doing these heavy lifts.

    I just got my elasticated knee wraps through the post today, so would like to know how to correctly wrap them around my knees.

    Btw, my knees dont hurt or anything (at present) but i can feel pressure sometimes when squatting, so i'd rather keep them protected.

    Thanks

    Ish
    The important thing is not to stop questioning!

  2. #2
    *Bingo Fuel clawhammer_33's Avatar
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    Focus on form, without that knee wraps are useless.
    Face it: biceps are the muscle that classifies you as a muscle man.

    Striding across the fields, carrying a vorpal blade, cometh Clawhammer! And he gives a bloodthirsty bellow:

    "As sure as predators devour prey, I shall paint the town a sanguine shade of doom!!!"
    Hilarity

  3. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    yep, i believe my form is good. i'm only starting on light weight.

    good form or not, squats will put pressure on knees, which i dont want.
    The important thing is not to stop questioning!

  4. #4
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    i start by going around 2" from my knee to 2" above my knee, then tucking the end it, I adjust the tightness to the support i want
    there is really nothing to it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ishaqmir View Post
    good form or not, squats will put pressure on knees, which i dont want.
    If you don't want to put pressure on the knees, then you need to learn how to squat like powerlifters. If you sit back into your squat and the shin remains vertical throughout the movement, you shouldn't be placing much stress on the knees at all.

    Knee wraps are fine, but like clawhammer said, without good form they aren't going to do much. ...and before you start saying how great your form is, IMHO we could ALL improve our form.

    From Dr. Squat:
    Here are the steps to go through when putting your wraps on:

    Sit on a chair or bench. Begin with the wrap completely stretched and rolled up (this makes the process much easier than fighting to stretch the wrap as you go).
    With your leg straight, start applying the wrap below the knees, working upward. Wrapping from "in" to "out," (counterclockwise for the left leg, clockwise for the right -- this helps avoid improper patellar tracking), anchor the wrap by applying 2 layers below the knees, then move upward, overlapping each previous layer by one-half the width of the wrap.

    Apply the wrap tightly as you move past the knee, stopping somewhere on the lower third of the thigh (powerlifting rules allow 10 centimeters above the patella).

    Most of the wrap is wound around the leg just above the knee joint in orderto "pin" the quadriceps tendon to the femur below -- better leverage). Tuck the end of the wrap under the previous layer to secure it. Repeat for the other leg.

    An alternative more suitable for fitness and bodybuilding, perhaps, is to wrap tightly around the upper shin (where the patellar ligament attaches), then more loosely wound over the kneecap itself (this is important to avoid grinding the patella into the femoral condyle, creating a case of chondromalacia for yourself), then tightly wound over the lower quarter of the thigh.

    The rationale for wrapping the knees prior to heavy squatting is that it reduced the pulling forces on the lower quadriceps and the quadriceps tendon at it's attachment to the patella. This translates to significantly reduced chances of avulsing (detaching) your quadriceps tendon or tearing your quads during heavy squatting. The chances of your patellar tendon avulsing from your tibia are a bit less, but nonetheless omnipresent.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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