The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member 123 champ's Avatar
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    Body Weight Excercises during the day

    Hey, i was wondering whether or not it is bad if i do body weight exercises throughout the day. For example, ill do 15 wide grip pull ups followed by 20 handstand pushups once every 3 hours during the day. Will these exercises stop my muscles from growing and recovering effectively?
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  3. #2
    Team Chesticles! Unholy's Avatar
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    Yes. training a muscle group every day is not good.
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  4. #3
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    I do it everyday.

  5. #4
    Team Chesticles! Unholy's Avatar
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    grats.
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  6. #5
    ANVIL POWER Detard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungHypnotiq View Post
    I do it everyday.
    you want a cookie?

    You grow OUT of the gym so there is really no point in hitting the gym, working your muscles hard then going home and doing bodyweight stuff. If your giving every session 100% then you shouldnt need to/be able to do bodyweight stuff at home...
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  7. #6
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    ok. I guess it depends what you are working for.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I don't think there's anything wrong w. doing some bodyweight exercises throughout the day as auxiliary/gpp work. I remember reading a number of articles by Louie talking about extra training sessions w. sled and band exercises.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  9. #8
    Risk10k Clifford Gillmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    I don't think there's anything wrong w. doing some bodyweight exercises throughout the day as auxiliary/gpp work. I remember reading a number of articles by Louie talking about extra training sessions w. sled and band exercises.
    Lou does them for recovery and GPP. I completely agree with him, I've started doing 100 rep push downs on days off as well as banded good mornings and pull throughs. I feel great during the week and my DOMS are almost not even there. I need a sled..

  10. #9
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    EVer heard of GTG(greasing the groove)

  11. #10
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Yes.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  12. #11
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    well. than you should already know that doing excercises everyday(as long as not to failure) works well

  13. #12
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Ummm, I was actually more or less on your side of the argument, but whatever.

    The tenets of GTG are solid, no doubt about it. Flawless, frequent, fluctuation, can't remember the rest off the top of my head without whipping out a Pavel book... But that doesn't necessarily mean squatting daily is a good idea for most or even many.

    Anywho, none of this really has anything to do w. the OP which is asking about doing some push-ups & pull-ups on his days off from the big 3 (which I am assuming as he/she posted this in the PL/OL forum).
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  14. #13
    Wannabebig Member magicman531's Avatar
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    As long as it's not overly strenuous on your I don't see it being a problem.

  15. #14
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    IF you're a powerlifter/lifting for strength gains, you should focus on the main workouts. If your workouts are effective, you don't need extra work. If you are able to do extra work beyond light conditioning, than you're probably not hitting your main workouts hard enough, IMO. Don't lose focus on your goal, if it's strength. People took the whole GPP thing and ran WAAAAYYYYYYY too far with it. You only need to be conditioned for what your goal requires. Rest is your best friend.

  16. #15
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RhodeHouse View Post
    IF you're a powerlifter/lifting for strength gains, you should focus on the main workouts. If your workouts are effective, you don't need extra work. If you are able to do extra work beyond light conditioning, than you're probably not hitting your main workouts hard enough, IMO. Don't lose focus on your goal, if it's strength. People took the whole GPP thing and ran WAAAAYYYYYYY too far with it. You only need to be conditioned for what your goal requires. Rest is your best friend.
    I don't disagree w. anything you said, but if you have a weakness that needs shoring up, you will probably need some extra attention to it and, for a lot of people, extra training sessions would be a good idea.

    Rest IS your best friend, but most people, with decent planning and conditioning, will not be wrecked from 5-8 hours of training/week.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  17. #16
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    I hear exactly what you're saying. My take on weak points is this - Everything is weak. That's how I've approached my training for a long time. My belief is, if you train everything like it's weak, you'll be able to address you weaknesses. If you focus on bringing up a weakness, you will tend to neglect another area, usually not on purpose. I've seen it happen too many times to myself in the past. Sorry for the run-on sentence.

  18. #17
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RhodeHouse View Post
    I hear exactly what you're saying. My take on weak points is this - Everything is weak. That's how I've approached my training for a long time. My belief is, if you train everything like it's weak, you'll be able to address you weaknesses. If you focus on bringing up a weakness, you will tend to neglect another area, usually not on purpose. I've seen it happen too many times to myself in the past. Sorry for the run-on sentence.
    Hmmm. I guess I'm not understanding how you will then take a leap and select or omit exercises. I get your point, but if you are someone w. limited training time (or just trying to be time-efficient), you will not be able focus on everything at once. My point is that if you have a weakness, it is (IMHO) a necessary evil that other things will take a backseat, at least temporarily, while you bring it up to snuff.

    That's not to say there aren't better ways to do that than, for example, completely giving up benching while bringing up the shoulder girdle to recover from a strain, but if you don't give that area its due there will continue to be problems and probably lead to other new ones.

    I'd be curious to hear how you might adjust your training program to rehab or bring up a weak area.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  19. #18
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    If I have a shoulder weakness, which I do. This is how I train, with that weakness in mind.

    Bench Assistance Work
    1. Military Press - work to heavy 3 or 5
    2. Heavy Rows
    3. DB Benches
    4. Rear Delts

    ME Bench
    1. Bench Work for that week (boards, shirt)
    2. DB Cleans/Side Raises
    3. Rows or Pulldowns

    I train everything. Within the workout, my shoulders are my main focus on the Assistance Day and a secondary movement on ME Day. I still train everything like it's weak.

    If I were rehabbing an injury or a beat up area, I would just find an exercise that I could do without pain, and work it by feel. If I warmed up and it felt good, I'd train like normal. If it still bothered me, I'd do work for it, but not very heavy. I always train everything in each workout, regardless of weak points or injury.

    As far as being time efficient, it's all about exercise selection. IF you could ONLY do 3 exercises for your Bench, which workout would you choose?

    Workout 1
    Heavy Bench
    Chest Supported Rows
    Standing Military Press

    Workout 2
    Heavy Bench
    Lat Pulldowns
    Side Raises

    If you want to be efficient, pick the big movements and stay away from the fluff. Choosing big exercises for weak areas, while still training everyhting, will bring up weak points in no time. It'll also build muscle. I see your points, but, I'm also looking at the novice lifter who really has no idea what their weak points really are. If they are new to lifting, everything is weak and should be brought up. If exercises are chosen wisely, strength will come. IMO, if you focus on weakpoints, the areas that you neglect, even temporarily, will become your next weakpoint. Then, you chase your tail in circles working on weakpoints instead of getting stronger.

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