Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Practical Programming

  1. #1
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Posts
    812

    Practical Programming

    Do you have your copy yet?

    You could spend years wandering this forum and not learn as much as what's in the book. Explains adaptation and programming when you hit ruts, basic physiology and much more. Explains the real difference between novice, intermediate and advanced trainees (which has nothing to do with strength BTW).

    "Practical Programming for Strength Training"

    Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore.

    Available on amazon.
    That's a picture of Scarlett Johansson.

  2. #2
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    My Head
    Posts
    6,112
    I'm going to get a copy soon. This will make another great addition to my library.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  3. #3
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    My Head
    Posts
    6,112
    Here's a Review from Lyle McDonald:

    Most books on periodization are theoretical tomes that present lovely models, charts and graphs but leave the reader at a loss to put it into a practical training format.

    Enter Practical Programming. Written by Lon Kilgore and Mark Rippetoe (with contributions from Glenn Pendlay), the authors of the excellent and highly recommended Starting Strength, this book presents an easy to read and practical approach to programming for strength training.

    Written in an easy to follow style, using easily understood charts and graphs where necessary, Practical Programming maps out training from novice to the most advanced levels of training. Sample workouts, progressions, in addition to troubleshooting tips are all provided.

    The book starts by covering physiological fundamentals of training, recovery, adaptation. This isn't a typical jargon filled book, the concepts are clear and presented for maximum understanding. This all provides the basis for the individuals chapters on programming.

    The section on novice trainers picks up where Starting Strength left off. A basic routine around a handful of primary movements (squat, bench press, deadlift, overhead press) is set up based on repeat sets of 5's. Explanations for how to progress weight, what to do when the trainee stalls and everything else a novice needs to now is present here. The novice stage may last 3-9 months for the typical trainee.

    In the intermediate section, a number of training models are provided. The intermediate needs heavier loading to make progress and rather than focusing on workout to workout improvements (like the novice), they start thinking in terms of weekly loading. Pendlay's Texas method (with one volume day, one intensity day, and one light day) is described in detail. Speed sets (ala Westside barbell), split routines and the original Bill Starr periodization model are also described here. Again, troubleshooting tips and progression options are well described here. The option of adding workouts as the trainee adapts is also discussed with 4,5 and 6 day training schemes (based around full body workouts) described. The inclusion of assistance movements for training is basically touched upon and I do feel that this is one place the book could have been expanded (noting that this would take a book of its own to completely cover). As well, some full workout routines illustrating how everything fits together would have been helpful here; instead only individual exercises are mapped out. The intermediate stage may last for the next 2 years of training and the book argues that the majority of strength trainers will never need anything more than intermediate level training anyhow. This is especially true of athletes who may only weight train heavily 8-12 weeks out of their competition year.

    Finally, several advanced models are presented based around the idea that advanced trainees need to think even longer term in terms of making progress. This may mean a 6-12 week cycle (or more) to make what gains are still possible as the trainee is now approaching his or her genetic cieling. Several models are again presented including the pyramid model (which uses volume as a primary stressor for 4-5 weeks followed by an intensity peak), the 2 steps forwards/1 step back model (favored by many Olympic lifters) which is percentage based and progresses over many 4 week blocks to a peak of strength, the building blocks model (where you sequence different training targets one after another) and finally a model based on hormonal dynamics developed by Pendlay and Hartmann which uses a short build up to a 2 week block of extremely heavy loading to peak strength several weeks later. Full workouts are laid out for each (a sample strongman cycle is provided for the building blocks model) and, again, troubleshooting tips are given for each. Notably, in the section on the building blocks model, the book includes a discussion of a topic I don't recall ever seeing mentioned in any other book on periodization (and I've read them all): the idea that training should be sequenced in terms of how well or how poorly a given capacity is maintained. Since hypetrophy is maintained easily, it can be trained further away from a peak than aerobic conditioning or technique. This has important implications for how the blocks are put together.

    The book rounds itself out with a brief discussion of special populations: youth, women, and masters lifters along with those rehabbing an injury. The same principles described in the book apply, but there are specific considerations. Finally, the book presents strength goals for different levels (novice, intermediate, advanced, elite) for men and women for several key lifts.

    I should mention that the book doesn't discuss the ever popular 'conjugate' method (used by Westside barbell), undulating periodization of several other popular models. Nor does it discuss how to integrate strength training with other aspects of sports training (conditioning, technique) outside of a brief section in the building blocks model.

    But what is described is described thoroughly and well and should keep any trainee with sufficient training options to keep them progressing as they get stronger.

    This book is a must have for any trainees shelf, the authors bring over 60 years of applied training to the table and provide logical, down to earth practical advice for anybody who wants to get stronger.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  4. #4
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    7,850
    Should be no surprise that I recommend it highly.

    I think everyone here should be required to read it before asking a training question, honestly.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
    Budiak: macked
    Budiak: heh maced
    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

    assgrabbers are never subtile, they will grabb ass whereever they go,public or not, I know the type, because I am one. - Rock

  5. #5
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    My Head
    Posts
    6,112
    And you know it's an excellent book when there's no used copies on Amazon...ever. There's also no used copies for Starting Strength as well. People would much rather keep these books.
    Last edited by sCaRz*Of*PaiN; 04-26-2007 at 09:19 PM.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  6. #6
    WBB Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,065
    Dumb question - will this book help specifically with bodybuilding, or is it more geared toward powerlifters, olympic lifters, sports athletes, etc.?

  7. #7
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    My Head
    Posts
    6,112
    It is geared toward anyone. Men, women, powerlifters, novices, advanced lifters, etc...
    Last edited by sCaRz*Of*PaiN; 04-26-2007 at 09:30 PM.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  8. #8
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    7,850
    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialK View Post
    Dumb question - will this book help specifically with bodybuilding, or is it more geared toward powerlifters, olympic lifters, sports athletes, etc.?
    It's geared to people that exercise with weights.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
    Budiak: macked
    Budiak: heh maced
    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

    assgrabbers are never subtile, they will grabb ass whereever they go,public or not, I know the type, because I am one. - Rock

  9. #9
    Senior Member RichMcGuire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,232
    Quote Originally Posted by sCaRz*Of*PaiN View Post
    It is geared toward anyone. Men, women, powerlifters, novices, advanced lifters, etc...
    It sounds like Im going to need to pick up these books!
    First Bulk pics VS Starting pics, take a look!! http://www.wannabebigforums.com/show...=1#post1616109

    Progress pics of a cut using bodyweight only movements http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...45#post2405745

    Generally, if you read a piece of advice on the internet, assume it's wrong until proven otherwise. This applies especially to "conventional wisdom". -Belial

  10. #10
    Senior Member KoolDrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    549
    No, but I just ordered Starting Strength. I plan on reading that and then probably buying Practical Programming as well.

  11. #11
    WBB Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,065
    I'm seriously considering buying this book. Should I get Starting Strength first, or would I be fine reading this one first?

  12. #12
    DeaTH BeFoRe WeaKNeSs sCaRz*Of*PaiN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    My Head
    Posts
    6,112
    They're both good, but perhaps start with Starting Strength. It doesn't really matter, though.
    "The only easy day was yesterday."

  13. #13
    Senior Member noahfor123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    507
    I just read this book and I have a couple questions.

    Can a trainee be both an intermediate lifter at some exercises/body parts and an intermediate at others? If I've never trained legs (not the case) but done a lot of upper body work, would I still make progress workout to workout training legs even if my ability to do so has ceased when it comes to upper body training? The answer seems pretty obvious, but I just want to make sure.

    I didn't bother reading the section on advanced trainees because I didn't think it would be applicable yet, but up until that chapter he doesn't mention taking a week off from training ever, only weeks of scaled back volume and intensity. Am I correct in thinking that weeks off aren't ever necessary?

    In the novice program, once the cleans are added, how are they to be trained - 3x5 or differently? I wasn't really sure about this.

    He says that explosive movements should be trained with something around 50% of 1RM. Does this also apply to cleans? The reason I ask is because it seems like an explosive squat with 50% of 1RM is different than a clean at 50% of 1RM because the 1RM squat will not be explosive, but the 1RM clean would still be an explosive lift.

    Why in the popular madcow intermediate 5x5 do the heavy deadlifts on Wednesday not make it a heavy day?

    In the Texas method, if you choose to do front squats on the light day, do you use a challenging weight, and the fact that it is less weight than a back squat make it suitable for a light day, or do you use a weight that isn't challenging - same with the press?

    Say I've been eating at maintenance and gotten to the point where workout to workout progress is impossible because of my resistance to the intensity of the workouts is too great, but any more intensity would be too much for my recovery system to handle. Could I increase my caloric intake to deal with the added intensity? This seems obvious but I'm just checking.

    Right now I'm doing the novice routine just to see if it is possible for me to make progress on it, but if it isn't I'm going to try out the Texas Method. Is this a correct application of the principles outlined in the book?

    Monday:

    Squats: 5x5
    Push Press: 6x3
    Pull-Ups: 6x4

    Hyper Extension: 2x8
    Saxon Side Bends: 2x6

    Wednesday:

    Front Squats: 3x3
    Press: 2x5
    Chin-Ups: 3x3

    Dips: 2x8 (should these be challenging, is there a better place for them)

    Friday:

    Dealift: 1RM
    Push Press: 3RM
    Pull-Ups: 3x3

    Hanging Leg Raises: 2x6
    Grip Work

    My goal is just total body strength. I just started jiu jitsu so I want to apply it to that, but I'm not really training with that in mind.
    Last edited by noahfor123; 05-28-2007 at 01:52 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Vapour Trails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Posts
    812
    Well I'd say it's not the proper structure because you are supposed to squat again on friday, 1x5 RM (A PR attempt). You haven't trained deads all week and then you are attempting a max on friday?
    That's a picture of Scarlett Johansson.

  15. #15
    Senior Member noahfor123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    507
    Thanks. See I wasn't sure if the Squats were set in stone or if they were just a specific example of a more general scheme. I thought that maybe as long as Friday was a full body workout that focused on high intensity with low volume that the exercise selection wouldn't matter (within reason).

  16. #16
    Learning as I progress
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,669
    Quote Originally Posted by Vapour Trails View Post
    Do you have your copy yet?

    Explains the real difference between novice, intermediate and advanced trainees (which has nothing to do with strength BTW).
    That particularly caught my attention, since I always ask that alot.

    Thnik im gonna pick that and Starting strength up, when I get a few dollars.
    Complication breeds desperation.

Similar Threads

  1. What programming language to learn?
    By BG5150 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 07-19-2006, 07:19 AM
  2. Interested in Programming?
    By defcon in forum General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-02-2005, 09:36 AM
  3. Practical Gains
    By jack_of_all in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-09-2005, 03:12 AM
  4. WML/WAP programming, anyone?
    By big in forum General Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-31-2002, 12:48 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •