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Thread: Rotator Cuff

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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Rotator Cuff

    Hi,

    I'm still new to the whole weightlifting thing.
    After my first workout I got tendonitis in both my arms. Since then I have taken it much slower and kept a neat diary of how I've been progressing.

    I started on supplements (creatine and protein) about 1 month ago. I have seen some good growth. I've had no injuries since my tendonitis and no fatigue the day after. Ok some days I feel just a little tired in certain areas - but not often. I assume the creatine is doing part of it's job.

    But recently I've had a really bad pain in the front of my shoulder, I have been told it is my rotator cuff. It hurts to lift my left arm and to rotate it. When I was doing a shoulder/upperback exercise I heard a noise in my left arm, like a snapping sound. I didn't know whether it was a bone clicking or what. I couldn't do any more reps but it didn't hurt really, it felt "odd" but not particularly painful. I woke up the next morning and my arm was in alot of pain. I put it down to the fact that I'd had 3 injections that day (for Tetanus, Polio and Diptheoria) and I'd had them 1 year early because I'm going on holiday and I need them - the nurse said because I'm having them early I will get a pain in the arm., it will last 24 hours. So today I wake up and it's just as bad.

    Do I keep doing light exercise or do I stop exercise completely in this area?

    It seems the more I move it the less it hurts, if I just stop moving it then when I do move it it really hurts.

    In the past, doing the same exercise with the same weight, I felt a slight pain in my right shoulder area but it didn't last. The next day I felt fine, infact after I'd finished it didn't "hurt" for longer that 10 minutes. It was a very similar pain. I put it down to a slight tear in the muscle. My shoulders have been growing the best IMO - atleast I'm moving up the weights much quicker with this part of my body that any other.

    Advice anyone?

  2. #2
    Wannabebig Member
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    Please note that it didn't occur when doing a shoulder press. When I do a shoulder press the pain is there but slight. I did the injury doing an Upright Row with my hands close together. I have only just started doing this exercise with hands close together, I always used to do it with my hands about shoulder width apart.

    Could this exercise be bad for me?

    Also, I hoisted a weight of 35kg up into the air then over my head so I could do squats - I had no-one to help me at the time. This also hurt my left shoulder area, I did this a couple of days before my injury actually occurred - but my left shoulder area didn't hurt the day after I did this act.

    ???

  3. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    Ok I've been trying a different range of movements. To lift my arm straight up infront of me doesn't hurt. To lift my arm up so it looks like I'm trying to fly hurts like hell, I can't lift my elbow past my shoulder, it hurts to even get it there - it hurts especially when my arm is bent at 90 degrees so my fingers point to the floor and the top of my arm is parallel to the floor while my forearm is perpendicular to the floor.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Stop doing upright rows. Ice. See a doctor. Heal up. Work on your mobility again and get back to lifting.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Wannabebig Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Stop doing upright rows. Ice. See a doctor. Heal up. Work on your mobility again and get back to lifting.
    It's amazing. I've taken anti-inflammatorys and iced it. Took 3 days off exercising my shoulder area in any way possible. And wallah! My shoulder is nearly fine, still hurts a bit. I cannot believe I have recovered this quickly. The doctor told me atleast a week.



    Thanks Sensei.

  6. #6
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    How do you know it's fine. People injur and get minor tears in their rotator cuff all the time and dont even know it, at least not until the injury gets worse or they actually rupture the muscle.

    As Sensei said, stop doing upright rows. If there really is no pain and you have already seen a doc start doing specific rotator cuff movements with extremely light weight to start. A google search should provide you with plenty of exercises.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's definately going to take more than a few days... I don't know if I was clear enough, but give up upright rows completely.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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