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Thread: Pullups form - straight arm?

  1. #1
    Newbie timlovesrugby's Avatar
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    Pullups form - straight arm?

    My physio told me that fully straightening my arm doing excercises such as pullups can lead to tennis elbow, as i had some signs of it.
    however on most videos ive seen of people performing them they seem to straighten.

    Should i leave jsut a bit of tension or use my old form?
    Tim - 17yo - 5' 8.4" / 162lb

  2. #2
    Watchya talkn bout willis
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    I go till about I could only go 1" more ROM because if my arms are straight it bothers my right elbow like you were saying.
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  3. #3
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    I always go to a full hang but don't lock out my elbows or anything.
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  4. #4
    Mojo Risin peacefrog's Avatar
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    Ye, I always keep a slight bend at the bottom of the rep.

  5. #5
    Senior Member KoolDrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peacefrog View Post
    Ye, I always keep a slight bend at the bottom of the rep.
    Same here. If I lockout, it feels weird in my left elbow.

  6. #6
    Newbie timlovesrugby's Avatar
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    ok thanks, im not the only one then ^.^

    as long as its not affecting the way the pullup affects me then i shall not straighten fully
    Last edited by timlovesrugby; 06-02-2007 at 05:07 AM.
    Tim - 17yo - 5' 8.4" / 162lb

  7. #7
    Getting un-streamlined Progress's Avatar
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    I lockout. I go nice and slow. I can't do weighted pull-ups any other way. I have had no elbow issues yet. I see no reason why a dead hang could be bad for your elbows.
    Last edited by Progress; 06-02-2007 at 06:29 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guido View Post
    I always go to a full hang but don't lock out my elbows or anything.
    Exactly. There's a difference between having a straight arm and hyperextending the joint.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  9. #9
    indomitable will.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progress View Post
    I lockout. I go nice and slow. I can't do weighted pull-ups any other way. I have had no elbow issues yet. I see no reason why a dead hang could be bad for your elbows.
    Same here. Complete dead hang between each rep. With added weight it almost seems like it would be more stress on my elbows to NOT go into a full hang.
    Last edited by Outshine; 06-02-2007 at 06:46 AM.

  10. #10
    Mojo Risin peacefrog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outshine View Post
    Same here. Complete dead hang between each rep. With added weight it almost seems like it would be more stress on my elbows to NOT go into a full hang.
    I think many people would disagree with that. When you lockout, you're transferring all the stress to the ligaments.

  11. #11
    Getting un-streamlined Progress's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peacefrog View Post
    I think many people would disagree with that. When you lockout, you're transferring all the stress to the ligaments.
    How about on deadlifts? You're locking your arms out there with even more weight.

  12. #12
    Mojo Risin peacefrog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progress View Post
    How about on deadlifts? You're locking your arms out there with even more weight.
    Ok, so a lockout with more weight. That doesn't necessarily mean that lockouts put less strain on the elbows. Anyway, I would guess that lockouts are more of a problem on pushing exericses, like leg press, where people hyperextend their knee to take all the weight of their muscles. I haven't read into it much, but I have been told by some people that this is bad for the knees.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I think you missed the point about a difference between straightening versus hyperextending the joint...

    Your muscles and joints are designed to be able to move through a full range of motion. If you want them to be strong through the full range of motion, you need to train them through the full range of motion (at least some of the time).
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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