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Thread: problem with squat

  1. #1
    Senior Member gmen5681's Avatar
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    problem with squat

    i dont know if its because i have broken and sprained my ankles so many times, but i when i squat i cant stay level footed. i get about 8 inches before parrell and i have to start to go on my toes. but the other day i was working and i was on a slight incline from back to front. my heel was about 1.5 inches higher than my toe and i was able to stay level footed straighted to ATF. so i was wondering if i put a small peice of something behind my heel at the gym i would be able to go lower and not screw anything up. but will that affect anything? i would think it would be fine, because i was able to press off with my heels instead of my toes on the incline,
    thanks
    joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmen5681 View Post
    i dont know if its because i have broken and sprained my ankles so many times, but i when i squat i cant stay level footed. i get about 8 inches before parrell and i have to start to go on my toes. but the other day i was working and i was on a slight incline from back to front. my heel was about 1.5 inches higher than my toe and i was able to stay level footed straighted to ATF. so i was wondering if i put a small peice of something behind my heel at the gym i would be able to go lower and not screw anything up. but will that affect anything? i would think it would be fine, because i was able to press off with my heels instead of my toes on the incline,
    thanks
    joe

    NO. Your heel should never be elevated by more than the height of a normal training shoe. Your problem is simply flexibility or a bad set-up stance.

    Read what Eric Cressey has to say about this. (the last question and answer)


    http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter55.html

    Granted he is talking about training females...but it is still applicable to both genders
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 06-12-2007 at 05:54 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member deeder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Songsangnim View Post
    NO. Your heel should never be elevated by more than the height of a normal training shoe. Your problem is simply flexibility or a bad set-up stance.

    Read what Eric Cressey has to say about this. (the last question and answer)


    http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter55.html

    Granted he is talking about training females...but it is still applicable to both genders
    I very strongly disagree.

    Have you ever seen an olympic weightlifting shoe?
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    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deeder View Post
    Have you ever seen an olympic weightlifting shoe?
    I'd call that a training shoe. I don't think Eric Cressey is against them, but I don't know.

    There's absolutely nothing wrong w. OL shoes (I wear them) but you should be able to squat properly without much of a heel. It's usually a hip and hamstring flexibility issue = Because your hams/hips are inflexible, your knees shoot forward to take the stress off of them and onto your quads and knees. When your knees track forward that far, unless you have mutant ankle strength and flexibility, your heels are going to come of the floor.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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    ^ That's another one of this tidbits of information that I'll file away. I just assumed it was calf/ankle flexibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deeder View Post
    I very strongly disagree.

    Have you ever seen an olympic weightlifting shoe?

    Like I said..... normal training shoe. OBVIOUSLY an Olympic weightlifting shoe would be a normal training shoe for those doing Olympic lifts.

    But I hardly see how that is relevant to the OP's situation...care to offer any solutions?
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 06-12-2007 at 11:58 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gmen5681's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    I'd call that a training shoe. I don't think Eric Cressey is against them, but I don't know.

    There's absolutely nothing wrong w. OL shoes (I wear them) but you should be able to squat properly without much of a heel. It's usually a hip and hamstring flexibility issue = Because your hams/hips are inflexible, your knees shoot forward to take the stress off of them and onto your quads and knees. When your knees track forward that far, unless you have mutant ankle strength and flexibility, your heels are going to come of the floor.
    im sure there is an issue with being flexible there too, but if i point my toes up (trying to touch my shin) i cant even break 90 degrees. my ankles are really bad. ive sprained each one over 6 times and broken both of them 2 times. ill just start stretching every night to see if i cant limber everything up.

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    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmen5681 View Post
    im sure there is an issue with being flexible there too, but if i point my toes up (trying to touch my shin) i cant even break 90 degrees. my ankles are really bad. ive sprained each one over 6 times and broken both of them 2 times. ill just start stretching every night to see if i cant limber everything up.
    I think you missed the point of my post entirely. My fault though - I didn't explain thoroughly enough.

    If your knees are tracking too far forward and your heels are coming off the ground, you probably need to work on hip and hamstring flexibility. Concentrate on sitting back into the squat and keeping the weight evenly distributed on your foot (most of the weight should be in your heels).

    I wouldn't worry about how low you can go with your toes up. I'm going to make a Squat Rx #2 in early July and it will probably talk about keeping the heel on the ground or how to correct GMing the squat. In the meantime watch this - some of the suggestions will definately apply. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rq8CWv8UPAI
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    Grammar Nazi BG5150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Concentrate on sitting back into the squat
    This was gonna be my advice.

    Also, pull some of the weight off the bar until you can do them correctly. When I first started, I used to use a 5# plate under my heels, but I trained myself to do without them. Maybe it was a flexibility issue; maybe it was a form issue.
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  10. #10
    Who me? Chubrock's Avatar
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    Don't worry about squatting, just use the leg press.

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