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Meat_Head
10-27-2005, 02:15 PM
Has anyone noticed hypertrophy from frequent sprinting/plyometrics? If so, to what degree? I used to sprint 3 times a week when I wasn't doing squats, it made my legs more sore than ANYTHING. I remember they were starting to look pretty good too, although I never did the sprints long enough to really see a difference.

squat it all!
10-27-2005, 02:18 PM
i've always felt like much of my early leg development (before i started lifting) was at least partly due to playing soccer for many years. lots of sprinting, jumping, quick stops, and changing directions. not exactly what you were asking, but at least somewhat related.

d'Anconia
10-27-2005, 02:23 PM
I think it could work ASSUMING that you were not sprinting for too long and that you were giving yourself enough rest time.

If those bases are covered I think it would make sense that you could see some hypertrophy and strength gains. You'd also get better at sprinting which is a very good plus.

Isaac Wilkins
10-27-2005, 02:26 PM
Has anyone noticed hypertrophy from frequent sprinting/plyometrics? If so, to what degree? I used to sprint 3 times a week when I wasn't doing squats, it made my legs more sore than ANYTHING. I remember they were starting to look pretty good too, although I never did the sprints long enough to really see a difference.

The degree of hypertrophy would depend on a lot of other factors (what else you were doing, your current development, etc). Sprinting targets the fibers with the most growth potential, pounds them very hard, and then is over. It works very well to create an anabolic response.

Meat_Head
10-27-2005, 03:24 PM
The degree of hypertrophy would depend on a lot of other factors (what else you were doing, your current development, etc). Sprinting targets the fibers with the most growth potential, pounds them very hard, and then is over. It works very well to create an anabolic response.

Cool, what do ya'll think would be the best method of sprinting for that goal?

Silverback
10-27-2005, 03:34 PM
Has anyone noticed hypertrophy from frequent sprinting/plyometrics? If so, to what degree? I used to sprint 3 times a week when I wasn't doing squats, it made my legs more sore than ANYTHING. I remember they were starting to look pretty good too, although I never did the sprints long enough to really see a difference.

Depends what your goals are, do you want to be good at sprinting or do you want the most muscular legs you can achieve on your body?

If your answer is the latter, then sprinting is not the answer, problem is that the stimulus is limited and you will quickly hit a wall in terms of size gains. Size is all about progressive resistance, combined with the diet, rest etc...

but if you want a pair of sprinters legs then u should be fine sprinting as you are.

TJH
10-27-2005, 03:42 PM
i've always felt like much of my early leg development (before i started lifting) was at least partly due to playing soccer for many years. lots of sprinting, jumping, quick stops, and changing directions. not exactly what you were asking, but at least somewhat related.

I agree because I'm in the same boat so I feel there is something to say about having good size legs and doing sprints.

-Tim

d'Anconia
10-27-2005, 06:09 PM
Actually I think Big-Andy may be right. You're not going to be able to create more resistance unless you get into using sleds (highly recommended IMO) or some other form of resistance.

MixmasterNash
10-27-2005, 07:32 PM
Actually I think Big-Andy may be right. You're not going to be able to create more resistance unless you get into using sleds (highly recommended IMO) or some other form of resistance.

You're saying sprinters don't have big legs?

http://www.ocregister.com/newsimages/sports/2004/08/0807greene.jpg

Sprinting is a wonderful adjunct to conventional weightlifting, and emphasizes different fibers, so the obvious conclusion is that one should do both for maximum gains.

fixationdarknes
10-27-2005, 07:40 PM
Sprinters are awesome.

Isaac Wilkins
10-27-2005, 07:42 PM
Cool, what do ya'll think would be the best method of sprinting for that goal?

Well, I obviously wouldn't sprint entirely for the sake of hypertrophy, as Big-Andy said.

However, like MMN added, I feel that sprinting is an excellent way to help the legs along in addition to keeping one lean and explosive.

To maximize hypertrophy from sprinting I'd suggest keeping the distance down, 40-100 meters/yards. Keep your rest times longish, but not obscene. For conditioning sake I tend to recommend resting about twice as long as the sprint between sprints. In your case, maybe 3-4 times. So if you ran a 5.0 second 40 (pretty quick, actually, in the general world), then rest maybe 15-20 seconds. As you became more fatigued then I'd rest a little bit longer.

An easy way to do it is to sprint a distance then walk briskly back to the start line and go again.

Also look into doing some jumping and bounding.

d'Anconia
10-27-2005, 07:46 PM
You're saying sprinters don't have big legs?


You know they DO lift weights, right? Of course sprinters who only do sprints as workouts would have big legs but they'd have bigger ones if they added some resistance I would think.

jed
10-27-2005, 07:58 PM
You're saying sprinters don't have big legs?

http://www.ocregister.com/newsimages/sports/2004/08/0807greene.jpg

Sprinting is a wonderful adjunct to conventional weightlifting, and emphasizes different fibers, so the obvious conclusion is that one should do both for maximum gains.

oh my god look at his hamstrings... *pass out*

MixmasterNash
10-27-2005, 08:09 PM
You know they DO lift weights, right? Of course sprinters who only do sprints as workouts would have big legs but they'd have bigger ones if they added some resistance I would think.

Of course, hence my point of combining sprinting work with lifting. I'd posit that sprinters probably have the best developed legs at the lowest body fat this side of heavy weight bodybuilders (save perhaps, short track cyclists and speedskaters, but they're just sprinters too).

Meat_Head
10-27-2005, 09:22 PM
Well I'm talking about sprinting as one tool in a kit of many to get big, functional legs. Do you all think as few as 5 40+ yard sprints a workout would be effective, or should I do more? Also, if you are TRUELY sprinting then you should be pushing your muscles to move as quickly as they possibly can. As you get faster, its harder on your body, hence progressive overload. I agree, however, that this only goes so far as unless your bodyweight changes the progression is of a more neural type the faster you get rather than steadily increasing resistance(correct me if I'm wrong) - unless you use a sled, sprint up hills, sprint wearing strength shoes, sprint against bands, gain weight, sprint wearing a weighted vest/backpack, sprint w/ a sports chute, etc.

But I don't know anything about the most effective way to train sprints... also what would be the best way to incorporate plyometrics into the equation? My plan is to move from my normal hypertrophy/strength training to more of a strength/power/functional program while burning fat for summer.

djreef
10-27-2005, 09:51 PM
5 is a good starting point - I work up to 12 in the off season just to stay in condition. The best way to do your sprints is to find a sport that involves running short bursts, like maybe a flag football league, or softball, or soccer (like squat). That way running doesn't seem like running - which has to be the gawd awfullest thing on the planet. You actually train while you're having fun - that way it doesn't seem like training. IMO combination training is the bomb. I can blow an extra 2" onto my thighs doing sprints vs weight training alone.

DJ

Meat_Head
10-27-2005, 10:38 PM
5 is a good starting point - I work up to 12 in the off season just to stay in condition. The best way to do your sprints is to find a sport that involves running short bursts, like maybe a flag football league, or softball, or soccer (like squat). That way running doesn't seem like running - which has to be the gawd awfullest thing on the planet. You actually train while you're having fun - that way it doesn't seem like training. IMO combination training is the bomb. I can blow an extra 2" onto my thighs doing sprints vs weight training alone.

DJ

Sweet, I'm already running routes and throwing the football 2+ times a week w/ my brother, also the occasional basketball game. I usually do about 10-20 sprints in a workout like that of different lengths. Catching the football involves plenty of leaping and lateral movement too, so should I leave it at that as far as sprinting/plyometrics goes?

djreef
10-28-2005, 08:42 AM
Sounds good to me.

DJ

MixmasterNash
10-28-2005, 09:08 AM
Sweet, I'm already running routes and throwing the football 2+ times a week w/ my brother, also the occasional basketball game. I usually do about 10-20 sprints in a workout like that of different lengths. Catching the football involves plenty of leaping and lateral movement too, so should I leave it at that as far as sprinting/plyometrics goes?

I happen to think that playing or practicing sports like this may be the best of all worlds. Working sprinting, coordination, lots of twisting/rotation, balance, etc.

People don't play enough sports.

fixationdarknes
10-28-2005, 09:48 AM
Hm...how about ultimate frisbee? I used to love that game. Sprinting down the field must be a good workout. I'm gonna start playing more sports now. Thanks for the inspiration.

Silverback
10-28-2005, 02:08 PM
You're saying sprinters don't have big legs?

Sprinting is a wonderful adjunct to conventional weightlifting, and emphasizes different fibers, so the obvious conclusion is that one should do both for maximum gains.

Maximum gains? when was the last time you saw Ronnie Coleman sprinting? Volume and intensity are finite, therefore gains will halt pretty soon, weights however are infinite thus size can keep coming, so long as the food is there to support it.

I see so many trainees with subpar legs, problem is they over-train, whether it be sprinting, basketball, football etc... the muscles can never fully recover and compensate for the stress they are recieving, so growth is not going to happen any time soon.

For me personally a novice trainee wouldnt sprint, if goals are adding as much muscle as possible in a given time frame. An advanced level athlete then different strategy's can be looked over, but it all comes down to the goals in mind.

MixmasterNash
10-28-2005, 02:31 PM
Maximum gains? when was the last time you saw Ronnie Coleman sprinting? Volume and intensity are finite, therefore gains will halt pretty soon, weights however are infinite thus size can keep coming, so long as the food is there to support it.

I see so many trainees with subpar legs, problem is they over-train, whether it be sprinting, basketball, football etc... the muscles can never fully recover and compensate for the stress they are recieving, so growth is not going to happen any time soon.

For me personally a novice trainee wouldnt sprint, if goals are adding as much muscle as possible in a given time frame. An advanced level athlete then different strategy's can be looked over, but it all comes down to the goals in mind.

Because Ronnie is a good indication of a natural trainee?

Sprinting athletes (track/bicycle/skating) have some of the most muscular legs of any athletes. Furthermore, they carry this muscle mass with very low bodyfat over long periods of time, unlike bodybuilders. Who else has really muscular legs at low bodyfat? (Non-heavyweight) Olympic weightlifters, for one. They obviously use explosive movements, just like sprinters do.

A true novice will benefit from any sort of conditioning and resistance training. That's not the question. Can sprints (or similarly, explosive lifting) improve musculature (and fitness) in almost any trainee? Yes.

Meat_Head
10-28-2005, 02:33 PM
Cool, thanks for the input guys! I'll just keep doing what I'm doing.

Silverback
10-28-2005, 02:46 PM
Because Ronnie is a good indication of a natural trainee?

Sprinting athletes (track/bicycle/skating) have some of the most muscular legs of any athletes. Furthermore, they carry this muscle mass with very low bodyfat over long periods of time, unlike bodybuilders. Who else has really muscular legs at low bodyfat? (Non-heavyweight) Olympic weightlifters, for one. They obviously use explosive movements, just like sprinters do.

A true novice will benefit from any sort of conditioning and resistance training. That's not the question. Can sprints (or similarly, explosive lifting) improve musculature (and fitness) in almost any trainee? Yes.

Yes i would agree on that. But OPTIMALLY?... no